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Development of faboodle to Interact on moodle through facebook

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With the rise of social networking portals such as facebook, twitter and myspace, the masses congregate and exchange ideas, ideologies and knowledge more liberally and more frequently. As an increasing number of learners as well as educators turn to social networking for education, Open Distance Learning (ODL) also needs to evolve to ride the wave in this fast paced flow of information. Many ODL as well as conventional institutions rely on Learning Management Systems (LMS) such as moodle to facilitate teaching and learning in cyberspace. The success of these LMS are largely dependent on the learners and educators proactively pulling information from them which requires them to access these systems consistently on a regular basis. This has been found to be challenging as the frequency of the users accessing these systems consistently is not vey high. However the frequency of users accessing social networking portals such as facebook has rapidly increased over past few years. “faboodle” or facebook for moodle is a facebook application which enables educators and learners to keep track of their courses and interact on moodle forums from within facebook. The application, built using FBML, ASP.NET and VB.NET utilising the moodle architecture, serves as a gateway between moodle based LMS and facebook where users can (i) securely login to their LMS from within facebook, (ii) check for updates in their courses and (iii) participate in the moodle forums. This paper describes the rationale, development process and the workings of faboodle. It also discusses the implications of implementing the system in a real world environment.
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... Reference literature (Manca e Ranieri, 2013;UNESCO, 2008) usually indicates speed and ease of access, rapidity of teacher's response, information sharing, interaction, innovation, mobility, collaboration and participation, favouring community culture, informality and user friendliness as some of the characteristics of Facebook associated with education. For some authors, the platform also compensates for the lack of moments and spaces of face-to-face interaction (Abeywardena, 2011), which are sometimes characteristic of the curricular organization. But the same literature also informs us about the main conditioning factors, such as concentration difficulties due to hypertextuality, and the lack of privacy in social networks. ...
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Students Interaction in the Online Learning Management Systems: A Comparative Study of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Courses
  • A P Teoh
  • Y C Aw
  • K Manoharan
Teoh, A.P., Aw,Y.C. & Manoharan, K. (2010). Students Interaction in the Online Learning Management Systems: A Comparative Study of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Courses. Proceedings of the 24 th Asian Association of Open Universities Annual Conference, Vietnam