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Connecting Ideas: Collaborative Innovation for a Complex World

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The key to South Australia’s future prosperity and sustainability may lie in improving our ability to build disciplinary bridges that span intellectual divides and enable a converged set of knowledge and skills to create innovative solutions to the social, economic and environmental challenges that we face. By connecting ideas across disciplines a self‐reinforcing process of collaborative innovation can emerge, offering more robust solutions to complex problems and challenges. In Connecting Ideas the case for establishing deeply embedded collaborations between scientists, HASS researchers and policy makers is set out. To build durable disciplinary bridges requires an appreciation of the multi‐faceted character of the challenges that we face and the contributions that all disciplines can make to innovation processes and outcomes.
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... he development of a more holistic innovation policy agenda that is human centred rather than technologically deterministic. In other words the prospects of solving the great challenges we face in the 21st century will be greatly improved by the insights and the contributions that HASS can provide as a key player in a modernised innovation agenda.'(Spoehr, Barnett et al. 2010, p.9) The critical issue in regards to the relationship between STEM and HASS is that a deterministic and narrow notion of the role of STEM to universities and the relationship to innovation is no longer tenable. The systemic nature of innovation and the cultural significance of scientific discovery entails an appreciation of the values ...
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