Testing Infrared Laser Phototherapy (810 nm) to Ameliorate Diabetes: Irradiation on Body Parts of Diabetic Mice

ArticleinLasers in Surgery and Medicine 45(4) · April 2013with8 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.62 · DOI: 10.1002/lsm.22130 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Irradiation of left flank of genetic diabetic mice with 660 nm wavelength laser, 100 mW, 20 seconds/day for 7 days did not significantly alter blood plasma glucose compared to nonirradiated controls. Infrared light would provide for a greater amount of photoenergy penetrating the skin and muscle. Genetic diabetic mice were irradiated with 810 nm wavelength laser to test for antidiabetic effect.
    Sixty-five diabetic mice were used. Body weight and water intake of mice were measured daily for 7 days prior to start of treatment (Day 0). Mice were irradiated with 810 nm wavelength laser, 50 mW, 40 seconds/day, 7 days on left flank (n = 11), mid-upper abdomen (n = 14), or left inguinal region (n = 14); some mice were not irradiated (control, n = 26). Body weight and water intake of mice were measured to Day 7. On Day 7, mice were fasted for 4 hours, anesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone (s.c.) and blood collected by cardiac puncture into EDTA-treated tubes. Blood plasma was assayed for glucose and fructosamine. Blood was collected and assayed from nonirradiated nondiabetic mice (n = 12).
    On Day 7 body weight was significantly lower and water intake significantly higher compared to Day 0 for diabetic mice irradiated on left flank (40.7 ± 0.5 vs. 42.2 ± 0.4 g, 28.2 ± 1.5 vs. 23.4 ± 1.5 g, respectively); there was no significant change for diabetic mice irradiated on mid-upper abdomen or left inguinal region and also for nonirradiated diabetic mice. On Day 7 blood plasma glucose levels for irradiated diabetic mice were not significantly different to nonirradiated diabetic mice. Blood plasma fructosamine level of diabetic mice irradiated on left inguinal region was significantly lower than for nonirradiated diabetic mice (312 ± 6 vs. 377 ± 15 µmol/L); for diabetic mice irradiated on left flank or mid-upper abdomen (362 ± 22, 357 ± 19 µmol/L) it was not significantly different to nonirradiated diabetic mice.
    Irradiation of left inguinal region in diabetic mice with 810 nm laser has potential to ameliorate diabetes as shown by decreased blood plasma fructosamine. Lasers Surg. Med. 9999:XX–XX, 2013.