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Overview of the application of laser-based techniques in plasma-wall interaction research program at IFPiLM

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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the progress in the application of the laser-based techniques which has been achieved in the research in the field of plasma-wall interaction (PWI) at the Division of Laser-Produced Plasmas (DLPP), Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IFPiLM, Warsaw, Poland) since 2005. The evolution of the experimental set-up which started in a simple configuration for the laser ablative co-deposit removal is presented with stress on the milestones which led to subsequent modifications, namely installation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), fast HR (high resolution) CCDs, pulsed fiber-laser and the common triggering system.

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