Hydrocarbons in the marine environment

Chapter · January 1975with 9 Reads
DOI: 10.1039/9781847555984-00109
In book: Environmental Chemistry Volume1, Chapter: 5. Hydrocarbons in the marine environment., Publisher: The Chemical Society. London, UK, Editors: G.Eglinton
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  • Article
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  • Chapter
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  • Article
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  • Chapter
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  • Chapter
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