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Phoenician Coins and Phoenician Exploration

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Numismatic evidence favoring the hypothesis of a Carthaginian presence in North America has recently come to light. The evidence is twofold. The first piece of evidence consists of a particular group of early Carthaginian gold coins (caIled staters) that bear a map (derived from modified Punic letters) showing both the Old World and the New World. Going from east to west, the maps show India, the south coast ofEurope above Sardinia and Sicily, and America. The second piece of evidence consists of aseries of seven or eight copper coins found scattered across North America from Nebraska to Georgia to Connecticut. The coins have an image of the Punic horse, the Phoenician palm tree (uprooted as if to be transplanted) and an enigmatic inscription in the Punic language. It seems unlikely that these coins were brought across the Atlantic in modern times, and if authentie they suggest a Carthaginian presence in ancient America.
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... The putative Carthaginian coins must now be removed from the body admissible evidence favoring a pre-Columbian transatlantic crossing. It gives me some chagrin to admit this, as I ha4 earlier come out mildly in support of the authenticity of these coins (McMenamin 1999b(McMenamin , 2000a(McMenamin , 2000b. Weak evidence (involving measurements of die axis; the Arkansas coin has a die axis [33 degrees] differing from the Alabama type coins [12 to 20 degrees]) in support of the authenticity of these coins (McMenamin 2000b) is superseeded by the strong evidence in the current work. ...
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In this book, Mark McMenamin demonstrates that putative Carthaginian coins found scattered across the United States (the "Farley Coins") do not date back to antiquity but are in fact provocative (i.e., uprooted palm tree device) forgeries, possibly produced and scattered to confound researchers with archaeological 'fake news.'
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