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The Influence of Family Attributes on College Students' Academic Self-concept

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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of family attributes on college students' academic self-concept. Family attributes include family communication, parental education, family structure, and parental involvement in activities such as arts and crafts, sports, and music. One hundred and fifty-five college students from a diverse private university completed the Academic Self-Concept Scale and a selfreported family attributes questionnaire. Results revealed that a family structure of two parents at home is associated with higher academic selfconcept than a single parent home. In addition, parents who praise their children and partake in family activities such as arts and crafts, tend to have children with higher academic self-concepts. The present study shows that parents continue to influence their child's development into the college years.
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... Academic motivation refers to the motivation that students feel or exhibit within an academic setting and is a concept that has been widely studied in relation to postsecondary student success; it has been shown to serve as a predictor for high achievement, not just for Latinos/as or transfer students, but for other groups as well (see Stover et al., 2012;Martin, 2016;Tasgin & Coskun, 2018;Wu, 2019;Young, Hawthorne, & Pugh, 2011). Academic self-concept is a term that describes students' perceptions about their degree of competence in a given academic sphere (Hamed, Hussin, & Jam, 2017); however, the conversation around academic self-concept and Latino/a postsecondary-level students is greatly underdeveloped, as there is little research addressing academic self-concept and ethnically diverse student populations, in general (see Choi, 2005;Dedonno & Fagan, 2013;DeFreitas & Rinn, 2013;Martin, 2016). ...
... The AMS, a psychometrically valid and reliable instrument rooted in selfdetermination theory (see Deci & Ryan, 1985), consists of three major subscales (intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and amotivation) and is a frequently used measure of student motivation (Stover et al., 2012). The ASCS provides a subjective measure of academic selfconcept (Flowers et al., 2013), and reliability and validity data for this instrument are wellsupported (see Cokley et al., 2003;Cokley & Patel, 2007;Dedonno & Fagan, 2013;Marsh, 1993;Reynolds, 1988). ...
... Seminal works by Marsh (1993), Reynolds (1988), and Reynolds et al. (1980) helped to lay the foundational groundwork for the study of academic self-concept. The instrument of choice to measure academic self-concept for numerous studies has been the Academic Self-Concept Scale, and multiple studies have been conducted in order to verify the validity and reliability data for the ASCS (Cokley et al., 2003;Cokley & Patel, 2007;Dedonno & Fagan, 2013;Marsh, 1993;Reynolds, 1988). In addition, Marsh et al. (2018) devised an integrated model of academic self-concept development by tracking measures of academic self-concept within school-age student-participants for six years. ...
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Latinos constitute the largest minority group of postsecondary school enrollees in the U.S., yet this group continues to lag considerably compared to other ethnic groups when it comes to the attainment of baccalaureate degrees. The specific problem is that while the vast majority of Latino/a community college students express intentions to transfer to four-year schools, only a fraction of them actually do and go on to successfully complete their bachelor’s degrees in a timely manner – within six years of initial enrollment. This quantitative study applied an ordinal logistic regression analysis in order to investigate the degree to which perceived social support, academic motivation, or academic self-concept is related to and predicts the amount of time that Hispanic students take to successfully transfer from public two-year to four-year institutions. Self-determination theory was the theoretical framework applied to the research. The sampling frame for this study consisted of Latino/a two-year program graduates and nongraduates who have successfully transferred to a public four-year college. Candidates for this study were anonymously recruited via the social media platform Facebook and obtained using a convenience sampling method, and the final sample consisted of 91 participants. Data was collected using a demographic questionnaire and three cross-sectional self-report surveys – the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Academic Motivation Scale, and the Academic Self-concept Scale. The findings of the overall logistic regression were not statistically significant; thus, the null hypothesis for the research question was not rejected. Recommendations from the findings include implementation of policies and programs that bolster Latino/a transfer students’ academic motivation, social support, and rate of successful vertical transfer and decrease their total time to degree. This dissertation research adds to a growing body of scholarly literature aimed at helping stakeholders to implement policies and programs that support Latino/a vertical transfer students in their efforts to complete bachelor’s degrees in a timely manner.
... Parents' healthy interactions with their child provide an opportunity for parents to be involved in their children education. Students whose parents maintain the two way communication and provide the space for them to express their opinions or views feel self-motivated and encouraged towards their education (DeDonno & Fagan, 2013). ...
... Furthermore, Marsh (1989) explained that academic self-concept reaches its lowest point in middle adolescence, but also, he found out that academic self-concept increase through early adulthood. Researches and multiple sources of empirical evidences show that begging with a positive self-concept is an important prerequisite for doing well in academics (Byrne & Shavelson, 1986;Marsh et al., 2005).In this account several studies have shown a positive relationship between academic self-concept and academic achievement (Reynolds, 1988;Marsh& Shavelson, 1985;DeDonno & Fagan, 2013). ...
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The adolescence is a very crucial period of any student's life. At this stage students face many psychological and sociological pressures in their life. Parental involvement and nature of parent student relation have an important impact on students' academic self-concept as well as their overall academic performance. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of parental age on secondary school students' academic self-concept. The participants consisted of 615 secondary students of CBSE board, session 2016-17 of Varanasi city, India. Academic self-concept was measured using Kample & Naik (2013) Academic Self Concept Scale (ASCS). The result of the study revealed that parents' age plays an important role in determining the academic self-concept of secondary school students. Students whose parents were younger keep higher academic self-concept than students whose parents were older. Mothers' age plays an important role in students' academic self-concept than fathers' age. Finding of the study would be helpful in understanding the role of parental age and parent adolescent relation in adolescent students' academic self-concept.
... 25 Assessments of selfconcept using the ASCS in undergradate students have reported average scores of 108.91 and 118.04. 26,27 While stress in pharmacy students has been previously described, little data exist regarding the impact of curricular revision on stress in health professions students. 28,29 Our institution has recently implemented a significant curricular revision to the PharmD program. ...
Article
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... Academic selfconcept correlates with academic achievement positively and significantly, but it does not correlate significantly with mental ability (Reynolds 1988). Reynolds' (1988) Academic Self-Concept Scale (ASCS) is Likert-type scale developed to measure the self-reported general selfconcept of college students in an academic setting and is a widely used instrument that has been thoroughly examined in previous research studies ( DeDonno and Fagan 2013;Marsh 1989;Reynolds 1988). Responses are measured on a scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly (Reynolds 1988). ...
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