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An Overview of E-Parliament Services: Designing for Citizen Awareness and Participation

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In an era of citizens' discontentment towards parliamentary democracy and a common perception that public opinion is not properly taken into account by governments, many national parliaments are striving to implement e-services that will attract citizens' interest and engage them actively in parliamentary procedures. This chapter provides an overview of e-parliament concepts and services, relevant initiatives organized by parliaments, governmental agencies, or NGOs, as well as technologies that can be used for such applications. The chapter intends to bring forward issues and opportunities for implementing e-parliament initiatives according to the needs and capabilities of different target groups, with a view to rendering e-parliament services more attractive for citizens, and, at the same time, more effective in their civic education aspects, more efficient in providing feedback to parliament stakeholders, and delivering usable outcomes for parliamentary e-participation.

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... Other challenges include limited access to affordable internet services and technologies, lack of awareness of e-parliament, and access to best practices in the field of ICT. Additional, factors reported in the literature and related to the adoption of digital transformation include resistance to change, low funding, digital literacy, citizen perceptions about usefulness of technology, facilitating conditions, along with inadequate policy interventions to drive the initiative (Gupta, 2018;Solis, 2017;Papaloi and Gouscos, 2012;Kamar and Ongo'ndo, 2007). Based on the aforementioned, these factors can be perceived as barriers to implementing modern technologies and services for achieving a more responsive, open, accessible and effective legislature (Sobaci, 2011). ...
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