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XELOC : un support générique pour la configuration et l’initialisation de systèmes

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Les données à prendre en compte dans un système multi-agents sont généralement nombreuses et de nature complexe. Beaucoup de temps est consacré à la modélisation du système et à son implémentation, mais les techni- ques dédiées à l’initialisation sont souvent non-explicitées et les schémas de configura- tion mis en place sont rarement réutilisables. Dans cet article nous présentons XELOC, un support pour la configuration et l’initialisation de systèmes multi-agents. XELOC est établi sur les bases du langage XML que nous avons enrichi par une sémantique de langage script. Ainsi, tout en permettant de définir un paramé- trage sous la forme d’une description XML classique, XELOC offre la possibilité de synthétiser une configuration complexe à l’aide d’une procédure dynamique. En outre, XELOC intègre une technique d’initialisation riche utilisant des cartes sémantiques fournies par des thématiciens. Tout ceci fait de XELOC, par nature extensible et accessible, un support générique utilisable dans de nombreux contextes d’implémentation. Configuring suitably an application, which implements a complex system is a difficult task due to the massive amount of data. This phase is often mistreated compared to the modeling one : arbitrary solutions are employed. The configuration schemes established are then rarely reusable in other projects, and the efforts engaged in this production are lost. In this paper we present XELOC, a language dedicated to the configuration and initializa- tion of multiagent systems. XELOC is estab- lished on the basis of a well-known descriptive language: XML. We added to this language another dimension by giving it the semantics of a scripting language. By nature, a XELOC code is easy to modify. As a programming language, it summarizes a complex parameters setting into a dynamic procedure and it includes an initialization method based on se- mantic maps produced by thematicians. All of these makes XELOC code generic and usable in several contexts of implementation.
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... To cope with this initialization problem, [3] constructed a modular language making it possible to express the hierarchical structure of the specifications of the components of a system in order to configure it. David & al. [6] constructed the XELOC language, based on the XML language, to automatically initialize a multi-agent model from semantic maps provided by thematicians. Despite these efforts, the approaches proposed are relatively ad hoc. ...
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