Article

A Diagnostic Model Incorporating P50 Sensory Gating and Neuropsychological Tests for Schizophrenia

Department of Psychiatry, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.23). 02/2013; 8(2):e57197. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057197
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Endophenotypes in schizophrenia research is a contemporary approach to studying this heterogeneous mental illness, and several candidate neurophysiological markers (e.g. P50 sensory gating) and neuropsychological tests (e.g. Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST)) have been proposed. However, the clinical utility of a single marker appears to be limited. In the present study, we aimed to construct a diagnostic model incorporating P50 sensory gating with other neuropsychological tests in order to improve the clinical utility.

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    • "In contrast, the HS group showed a significant P50 attenuation effect, where the S 2 elicited a response similar to the S 1 leading to an almost null suppression effect. These effects have consistently been observed in schizophrenia, where patients show considerable reductions in P50 suppression (Shan et al., 2013 "
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    • "In contrast, the HS group showed a significant P50 attenuation effect, where the S 2 elicited a response similar to the S 1 leading to an almost null suppression effect. These effects have consistently been observed in schizophrenia, where patients show considerable reductions in P50 suppression (Shan et al., 2013 "

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