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Concurrent penetrating injury to the male external genitalia and the anterior urethra is uncommon. This case illustrates an unusual cause of such an injury, and its subsequent management and outcome. A 69-year-old man had his scrotum and anterior urethra pierced by a long thorn when he fell in his farm. He presented with urine leakage from the scrotal wound each time he micturated. Cystoscopic examination confirmed the cause and extent of the injury, and also facilitated the extraction of the thorn. The injury was allowed time to heal by urinary diversion with a urinary catheter. There were no stricture or fistula formations and the patient remained symptom-free at 3 months follow-up. Careful cystoscopic examination was both diagnostic and therapeutic in this case. A conservative approach is a feasible option in the management of selected cases of penetrating anterior urethral injury. Clin Ter 2013; 164(1):35-37. doi: 10.7417/CT.2013.1509.
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