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Aroma impact compounds of Arabica and Robusta coffee. Qualitative and quantitative investigations

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  • German Research Centre for Food Chemistry

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AROMA IMPACT COMPOUNDS
OF
ARABICA
AND
ROBUSTA
COFFEE.
QUALITATIVE
AND
QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS
I.
BLANK
*, A. SEN **, W.
GROSCH
*
*
Deutsche Forschungsanstalt
r
Lebensmittelchemie,
Lichtenbergstraße
4,
8046
Garching,
Germany.
**
Pharma
Italia,
Erhard Straße
27,
8000 München
2,
Germany.
Introduction
The volatile fraction of roasted coffee is extremely complex, consisting of
more than 700 compounds [1] with a wide variety of functional groups.
During the last decade, efforts have been undertaken to evaluate those vo-
latile compounds which contribute significantly to the aroma of roasted
coffee.
On the basis of the odor unit concept [2], Tressl [3] has suggested
that 2-furfurylthiol is the most important odorant. In addition, he repor-
ted that the other compounds listed in Table 1 are of significance for the
coffee flavor. Recently, Holscher et al. [4, 5], using gas chromatogra-
phy/olfactometry (GC/O) of serial dilutions of the volatile fraction (aroma
extract dilution analysis, AEDA [6]), confirmed that some of the odorants
suggested by Tressl [3] are indeed intensely involved in the coffee flavor
(Table 1). In addition, these authors identified further character impact
compounds which are summarized in Table 1.
It is well-known [review in 7] that the two varieties of coffee, Arabica
and Robusta, differ in their aromas. Several authors have compared the vo-
latile fractions of the two varieties, but they have not evaluated the con-
tribution of the identified compounds to the flavor differences of the two
coffees.
Vitzthum et al. [8] have recently reported, that 2-methylisobor-
neol resembles the typical earthy aroma impression of the Robusta coffee.
ASIC,
14
e
Colloque,
San
Francisco,
1991 117
Table 1: Important odorants of the coffee flavor according to Tressl [3]
and Holscher et al. [4, 5]
Compound Tressl [3] Holscher et al. [4, 5]
2-Furfurylthiol
+ +
2-Methyl-3-furanthiol
- +
5-Methyl-2-furfurylthiol
+
3-Methyl-2-buten-l-thiol
- +
Furfurylmethyldisulphide +
3-Mercapto-3-methylbutylformate
- +
3-Mercapto-3-methyl-l-butanol
- +
Methional - +
Kahweofuran +
Ethyldimethylpyrazine + +
Acetylpyrazine + -
Trimethylpyrazine - +
2-Methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine
+ +
2-Methoxy-3-isopropylpyrazine
- +
Linalool - +
Guaiacol + +
4-Vinylguaiacol
+ +
ß-Damascenone
- +
Furaneo1 + +
2,3-Pentandione
+ +
2,3-Butandione
(diacetyl) - +
(E)-2-Nonenal +
2-/3-Methylbutanal
+ +
2-/3-Methylbutanoic
acid - +
Acetic acid - +
The aim of the following study was to identify the potent odorants of Ara-
bica and Robusta coffee (powder and brew) and to show the differences of
these two varieties. The identification experiments were focussed on those
compounds which were evaluated by AEDA as important odorants. As AEDA is
only a screening method [9], some odorants, contributing to important notes
within the odor profile of the two varieties, were quantified and the odor
units were calculated on the basis of odor/taste threshold values in water.
118
ChimiejBiochimie
The methods used for the analysis of the coffee aroma are summarized in
Table 2. The volatiles were isolated by solvent extraction from both, the
roasted ground powder and the brew. The aroma extract was separated from
the non-volatile compounds by high vacuum transfer and the volatile frac-
tion obtained was analysed by GC/O. The odorants were characterized by
their retention index, odor quality and relative odor activity
(FD-factor).
The odorants with high FD-factors were identified and their odor threshold
values were determined. Important odorants were quantified using stable
isotope dilution methods and then compared on the basis of odor activity
values calculated by dividing the concentration levels in coffee (powder
and brew) through the flavor thresholds in water.
Table
2 :
Methods used for the analysis of coffee aroma
Method
Result
Solvent extraction, high vacuum
transfer [10]
Gas chromatography/olfactometry
(GC/O [11])
Aroma extract dilution analysis
(AEDA [6])
Enrichment procedures
(column chromatography, HPLC,
preparative GC)
Identification experiments
(Capillary GC, MS, NMR)
Sensory characterization [11]
Synthesis
Stable isotope dilution assay
(SIDA
[12]);
calculation of
odor units [2]
Aroma extract
Retention index and odor of the volatiles
FD-Chromatogram (FD-factors: ranking of
the volatiles on the basis of their odor
units determined by GC/O)
Pure odorants
Chemical structure
Threshold values (in air, water)
Reference compounds, labeled compounds
Quantitative data of some important
odorants;
their flavor significance
expressed as odor units
119
Results
and
Discussion
Identification
of
important odorants
About 50-60 odorants were found in the GC-effluent of the aroma extracts of
Arabica and Robusta coffee. As examplified for the Arabica coffee (roasted
powder) the FD-chromatogram fFig. 1) indicated 38 odorants with FD-factors
> 16. Most of the 38 odorants were identified on the basis of GC and MS
data (footnote "d" in Table
3) .
Only the amounts of the compounds nos. 5,
21 and 37 were so low in the volatile fraction that no clear MS signals
were obtained. The identification of these compounds as 2-methyl-3-furan-
thiol (no. 5), 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine (no. 21) and bis(2-methyl-3-
furyl)disulphide (no. 37) was based only on comparison of GC and sensory
data with that of the corresponding reference substances. Their sensory im-
portance can be explained by the low threshold values (0.001-0.01 ng/1 air)
[13].
20A8-
512-
u
2
128
i
Q
LJ_
32
16
FD-Chromatogram of Arabica Coffee (roasted powder)
35
U
1 2
8 12
17
25
21 26 30 333/,
31
19
28
700
900
1100
1300
(RIjOV-1701)
36
38
1500
1700
Figure 1. Flavor dilution chromatogram of the volatiles isolated from the
roasted powder of Arabica coffee. Numbering of the flavor com-
pounds as in Table
3
;
FD-factor: flavor dilution factor; RI: re-
tention index.
120
Chimie I Biochimie
Three odorants (nos. 14, 17 and 35) appeared with the highest FD-factor (FD
= 2048) in the FD-chromatogram (Fig.
1) .
As shown in Table 3 they were
identified as 3-mercapto-3-methylbutylformate (no. 14), 3,5-dimethyl-2-
ethylpyrazine (no. 17) and (E)-ß-damascenone (no. 35). Their odor qualities
were described as "catty", "earthy-roasty" and "honey-like", respectively.
Further odorants summarized in Table 3 were sotolon (no.
30) ,
abhexon (no.
33),
4-methoxybenzaldehyde (no. 32) and bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)disulphide
(no.
37). These compounds were identified for the first time in the coffee
aroma.
Sotolon and abhexon smelled "seasoning-like" and, in higher dilu-
tion,
"caramel-like". Other volatiles contributing with "caramel-like,
sweet"
odor qualities to the aroma of coffee were furaneol (no. 24), 3,4-
dimethyl-2-cyclopentenol-l-one (no. 22) and an unknown compound (no. 29).
The identification of such polar enoloxo compounds in low concentrations is
difficult, since they are more or less adsorbed at the capillary during the
GC-procedure [14]. It was observed that the lower the amount injected on
the capillary the higher the proportion which was adsorbed. These effects
were the smallest on the FFAP stationary phase which was, therefore, used
for the AEDA of the enoloxo compounds.
Odorants with the impression "sweet" in combination with an additional odor
quality were diacetyl (no. 1,
buttery),
2,3-pentandione (no. 3,
buttery),
methional (no. 8,
potato-like),
5H-5-methyl-6,7-dihydrocyclopentapyrazine
(no.
27,
nutty),
p-anisaldehyde (no. 32,
minty),
bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)di-
sulphide (no. 37, meaty) and vanillin (no. 38,
vanilla-like).
About one third of the potent odorants were described as "roasty" in combi-
nation with an additional odor quality. 2-Furfurylthiol (no. 6, coffee-
like),
3-mercapto-3-methylbutylformate (no. 14,
catty),
2-methoxy-3-iso-
propylpyrazine (no. 15,
earthy),
3,5-dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazine (no. 17,
earthy),
2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine (no. 21, earthy) and two unknown com-
pounds (nos. 19 and 26, earthy) belonged to this group.
Important odorants with "honey-like" or "spicy" aroma qualities were
(E)-ß-
damascenone (no. 35), phenylacetaldehyde (no. 18) and guaiacol (no. 23), 4-
ethyl-
and 4-vinylguaiacol (nos. 31 and 34), respectively.
The compounds found in this study as important for the flavor of roasted
coffee powder are in good agreement with those reported by Holscher et al.
[4,
5] (Table
1) .
The presence of 2-furfurylthiol, ethyldimethylpyrazine,
2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine, 4-vinylguaiacol, furaneol and 2,3-pentandione
121
Table 3
;
Important odorants of the roasted powder of Arabica coffee
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
(FD > 16)
a
Compound
2,3-Butandione
ÍDiacetyl)
d
3-Methylbutanal
d
2,3-Pentandione
d
3-Methyl-2-buten-l-thiol
2-Methyl-3-furanthiol
e
2-Furfurylthiol
d
2-/3-Methy1butanoic
acid
d
Methional
d
Unknown
2,4,5-Trimethylthiazole
d
2,3,5-Trimethylpyrazine
Unknown
3-Methyl-3-mercapto-l-butanol
d
3-Methyl-3-mercapto-butylformate
d
2-Methoxy-3-isopropylpyrazine
d
2,4-Dimethyl-5-ethylthiazole
d
3,5-Dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazine
d
Phenylacetaldehyde
d
Unknown
Linaloo1
d
2,3-Diethyl-5-methylpyrazine
e
3,4-Dimethyl-2-cyclopentenol-l-one
d
Guaiacol
2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone
(Furaneol)
2-Methoxy-3-i
sobutylpyrazine
d
Unknown
SH-S-Methyi-e^-Dihydrocyclopentapyrazine
0
'
(E)-2-Nonenal
d
Unknown
4,5-Dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone
(Sotolon)
d
4-Ethylguaiacol
d
p-Anisaldehyde
d
4-Methyl-5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone
(Abhexon)
d
4-Vinylguaiacol
d
(E)-ß-Damascenone
a
Unknown
Bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)disulphide
e
Vanillin
d
Retention index"
OV-1701
686
739
791
874
930
1004
1022
1040
1073
1074
1078
1107
1127
1138
1146
1149
1154
1178
1185
1193
1218
1226
1228
1235
1237
1254
1260
1275
1305
1347
1424
1431
1433
1482
1502
1620
1640
1645
SE-54
580
650
695
821
870
913
860
909
997
1000
1055
972
1023
1097
1078
1083
1053
1103
1102
1155
1075
1065
1186
1184
1145
1160
1107
1287
1263
1193
1323
1395
1540
1410
FFAP
990
950
1060
1440
1455
1365
1370
1395
1655
1517
1428
1435
1453
1635
1485
1840
1990
2035
1520
2090
2200
2032
2030
2270
2205
1815
2355
2150
>2500
Aroma quality
c
buttery
malty
buttery
amine-like
meaty
roasty (coffee)
sweaty
potato-like, sweet
fruity
roasty, earthy
roasty, earthy
roasty, sulfury
meaty (broth)
catty, roasty
earthy, roasty
earthy, roasty
earthy, roasty
honey-1ike
roasty, earthy
f1owery
earthy, roasty
caramel-like
phenolic, spicy
caramel-1 ike
earthy
roasty, earthy
roasty, sweet
fatty
caramel
-1
ike
seasoning-like
spicy
sweet,
minty
seasoning-like
spicy
honey-like, fruity
amine-1ike
meaty, sweet
sweet (vanilla)
122
Chimie ¡Biochimie
Footnotes of Table 3
a Numbering as in Fia. 1.
b
RI: Retention index on the capillary [10].
c
Odor quality perceived at the sniffing-port.
d
The compound was identified by comparing it with the reference substance
on the basis of the following criteria:
MS/EI, MS/CI,
RI data (on OV-
1701,
SE-54 and FFAP) as well as of the odor quality and threshold, which
was perceived at the sniffing-port.
e
The MS signals of the substance were too weak for an interpretation; the
compound was only identified by comparing it with the reference substance
on the basis of the resting criteria reported in footnote d.
also agrees with the suggestion of Tressl [3], that these odorants belong
to the key compounds of the coffee flavor. In the capillary gas chromato-
grams of the coffee volatiles, Holscher et al. [5] have localized two
addi-
tional odorants of unknown structure with high FD-factors. In the present
study, they were identified as sotolon and abhexon.
Differences between the powders
of
roasted Arabica and Robusta coffee
The odorants of roasted Arabica and Robusta coffee powders were compared on
the basis of their FD-factors. All of the odorants identified with FD-fac-
tors > 16 contribute to the aroma of both coffee varieties. Linalool was an
exception occurring only in Arabica coffee. According to the data summari-
zed in Table 4 3,5-dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazine appeared with the highest FD-
factor in both coffee varieties. However, differences were found in the
concentration levels of some important coffee odorants.
2,3-Diethyl-5-methylpyrazine and 4-ethylguaiacol were predominant in the
Robusta coffee and 3-mercapto-3-methylbutylformate, sotolon and abhexon in
the Arabica coffee. Further significant differences were found for 2-me-
thyl-3-furanthiol, phenylacetaldehyde, 3,4-dimethyl-2-cyclopentenol-l-one,
2-/3-methylbutanoic acid and linalool, all predominating in the Arabica
coffee,
and for 3-methyl-2-buten-l-thiol, which prevailed in the Robusta
coffee.
The comparison of the coffee varieties indicated in addition that compounds
causing "caramel-like, sweet-roasty" odor qualities were high in Arabica
coffee,
while those having "spicy" and "earthy-roasty" qualities con-
tributed more significantly to those of the Robusta species. These
123
Table 4: Important odorants of roasted Arabica and Robusta coffee (powder
and brew)
No.
Compound
17 3,5-Dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazine
35 (E)-ß-Damascenone
14 3-Mercapto-3-methylbutylformate
21 2,3-Diethyl-5-methylpyrazine
34 4-Vinylguaiacol
25 2-Methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine
19 Unknown
3
0
Sotolon
33 Abhexon
31 4-Ethylguaiacol
2
6
Unknown
6 2-Furfurylthiol
8 Methional
15 2-Methoxy-3-isopropylpyrazine
5 2-Methyl-3-furanthiol
11 2,3,5-Trimethylpyrazine
28 (E)-2-Nonenal
3
6
Unknown
18 Phenylacetaldehyde
22 3,4-Dimethyl-2-cyclopentenol-l-one
7 2-/3-Methylbutanoic acid
20 Linalool
5 3-Methyl-2-buten-l-thiol
27 5H-5-Methyl-6,7-dihydrocyclopenta-
pyrazine
23 Guaiacol
13 3-Mercapto-3-methyl-l-butanol
38 Vanillin
37 Bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)disulphide
24 Furaneol
FD-factor^-,"
c
Arabica Robusta
100
100
100
25
25
25
25
25
e
25
e
13
13
13
6
6
6
f
3
3
3
3
3
e
3
e
3
e
2
2
2
e
2
e
2
2
100
50
25
100
50
25
25
2
e
3
e
50
25
13
3
3
2
f
2
2
2
1
<l
e
<l
e
-
6
3
3
e
<l
e
2
2
Ri
DJ
Arabica
50
3
13
6
25
6
6
100
e
50
e
25
2
3
25
2
<l
f
2
<1
3
2
6
e
3
e
<1
<1
<!
I
e
3
e
25
e
6
Robusta
100
6
3
50
50
3
25
6
e
3
e
50
6
3
13
3
<l
f
3
<1
6
1
2
e
<l
e
-
<1
<!
3
e
2
e
13
e
3
13«
a
Numbering
as in Fig. 1 and
Table
3.
b
The
FD-factor (OV-1701)
of
each compound (Table
3) was
related
to the
compound with highest FD-factor which
was set to 100.
c
Both coffee varieties were roasted
3 min
using
a
jetzone roaster,
par-
ticle size
of the
coffee powder: 300-500
/¿m.
d
The
brew
was
obtained
by
extracting
54 g of the
powder with
1 L of hot
water
(80-100°C).
e
The
FD-factor
was
determined
on
FFAP.
The FD-factor
was
determined
on
SE-54.
124
Chimie I Biochimie
differences in the composition of the important odorants corresponded to
the differences in the overall aromas of the two varieties.
Differences between the brews
of
Arabica and Robusta coffee
A comparison of the odorants isolated from the brews of Arabica and Robusta
coffee (Table 4) revealed a shift in the predominating flavor compounds.
Sotolon, abhexon, furaneol and 3,4-dimethyl-2-cyclopentenol-l-one showed
significant higher FD-factors in the Arabica than in the Robusta coffee.
This difference suggested that these odorants were mainly responsible for
the "sweet, mild" aroma of the Arabica coffee.
During the extraction with hot water the water-soluble enoloxo compounds
were enriched in the brew and,
thus,
enhanced the caramel-like flavor
notes,
in particular of the Arabica coffee. Hodge [15] has reported that a
planar enoloxo structural element in a volatile compound is responsible for
the caramel-like odor impression.
The aroma of the Robusta coffee brew was mainly influenced by compounds ha-
ving "roasty-earthy" and "spicy" odor qualities like 2,3-diethyl-5-me-
thylpyrazine, 3,5-dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazine, 4-ethylguaiacol, 4-vinylguaia-
col and the odorant no. 19. These odorants, in combination with the lower
amounts of compounds having caramel-like aromas, were responsible for the
"harsh,
earthy, less pleasant" flavor notes of Robusta coffee.
Compared to the powders, vanillin, methional, furaneol and sotolon in-
creased in the brews, in particular of the Arabica coffee. On the other
hand (E)-ß-damascenone, (E)-2-nonenal, the temperature labile thiols 3-mer-
capto-3-methylbutylformate, 2-furfurylthiol, 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 3-me-
thyl-2-buten-l-thiol, and also linalool decreased strongly. This effect was
also observed for 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine and 2-methoxy-3-isobu-
tylpyrazine, which also decreased especially in the Arabica coffee.
Quantitative data
The quantitative analysis of the compounds were performed by means of a
stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) in order to compensate for losses
during the isolation procedure [12]. In the SIDA the odorant labeled with a
stable isotope is used as internal standard. Until now a SIDA was developed
for the quantification of furaneol, diacetyl [16], 2,3-pentandione, 4-
125
Table
5:
Concentrations
of
some important odorants
in the
brews
of
Arabica
and Robusta coffees
Compound
a
Diacetyl
(
13
C
2
)
2,3-Pentandione
(d
3
)
Furaneol
(
13
C
2
)
Sotolon
c
Abhexon
(d
3
)
4-Ethylguaiacol
(d
2
)
4-Vinylguaiacol
3-Mercapto-3-methylbutylformate
(d
g
)
(E)-ß-Damascenone
(d
6
)
Arabica
1.7
1.3
6.6
1.0
0.1
0.06
1.0
0.006
n.d.
Robusta
Concentration
13
1.3
0.7
1.5
0.2
<0.03
0.4
n.d.
0.002
0.003
a
The
quantification
was
performed
as
stable isotope dilution assay.
The
labeling
of the
internal standard with
the
stable isotope
is
given
in
bracketts
(
13
C:
carbon-13,
d:
deuterium).
b
Concentration: mg/1 brew prepared from
54 g
roasted coffee powder.
c
Sotolon was determined using d-j-abhexon
as
internal standard.
d
4-Vinylguaiacol
was
determined using d
2
-4-ethylguaiacol
as
internal stan-
dard.
n.d.:
not
determined.
Tabel
6.
Odor activity values (OAV)
of
important flavor compounds
in the
brews
of
Arabica
and
Robusta coffees
Compound
Diacetyl
2,3-Pentandione
Furaneol
Threshold
a
15
b
30
b
100
b
30
c
Arabica
OAV
113
43
66
220
Robusta
OAV
87
24
15
50
a
jug/kg water.
b
Odor threshold (nasal
perception).
c
Flavor threshold (retronasal perception)
126
Chimie ¡Biochimie
ethylguaiacol, abhexon, (E)-ß-damascenone and 3-mercapto-3-methylbutylfor-
mate in the brews of both, Arabica and Robusta coffees.
As shown in Table 5. the amounts of diacetyl and 2,3-pentandione were hig-
her in Arabica than in Robusta coffee brew indicating the importance of the
buttery top-notes for the mild aroma of Arabica coffee. This becomes more
clear when comparing the odor activity values (OAV, Table
6) .
The higher
OAV of diacetyl indicated that this dione contributed more significantly to
the aroma of the brews than 2,3-pentandione.
Quantitative measurements of furaneol which was used as indicator substance
for the caramel-like odorants revealed one reason for the odor difference
between Arabica and Robusta. The concentration of furaneol was 4.5 fold
higher in the brew of Arabica coffee than in the corresponding sample of
the Robusta species (Table
5) .
Calculation of OAV (Table 6) confirmed the
stronger effect of furaneol on the flavor of Arabica coffee compared to the
Robusta variety. The concentrations of sotolon and abhexon were lower than
those of furaneol, but also these enoloxo compounds prevailed in the Ara-
bica coffee (Table 5).
The OAV of diacetyl in Arabica coffee brew was
2-fold
higher than the OAV
of furaneol. In contrast, the FD-factor of furaneol was
8-fold
higher. This
difference indicates the great losses of diacetyl during the isolation pro-
cedure compared to the higher boiling compounds like furaneol.
Thus,
the
importance of high volatile compounds was underestimated by the AEDA.
The results in Table 5 show, furthermore, the significantly higher concen-
tration of 4-ethylguaiacol in the Robusta coffee compared to the Arabica
coffee.
This agreed with the sensory data obtained by the AEDA indicating
the importance of phenol-derivatives for the aroma of Robusta coffee.
The predominance of 3-mercapto-3-methylbutylformate in the Arabica coffee
was also in agreement with the results of the AEDA.
Acknowledgements. The work was supported by the Forschungskreis der Ernäh-
rungsindustrie (Hannover) and the AIF
(Köln) .
We are grateful to Miss
Kustermann, Miss Foschum and Miss Reinhard for skilful technical
assi-
stance.
127
The volatile components of roasted Arabica and Robusta coffees (powder and
brew) were analysed by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC/O) which
revealed the odorants having the highest odor-activity values (ratio of
concentration to odor
threshold).
This procedure resulted in 38 odorants of
which 32 were identified. The powders of the two coffee varieties differed
in the concentration levels of these compounds.
The results indicate that the flavor difference between Arabica and Robusta
coffee (powder and brew) are mainly due to the predominance of enoloxo com-
pounds (sotolon, abhexon, furaneol, 3,4-dimethylcyclopentenol-l-one) in the
former and of 3,5-dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazine, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine,
4-ethylguaiacol and 4-vinylguaiacol in the latter. Preparation of brews en-
hanced the flavor difference, as the concentration levels of water-soluble
odorants (furaneol, sotolon, abhexon) responsible for the "sweet-caramel"
flavour note increased more in the Arabica than in the Robusta coffee. On
the other hand, the alkylpyrazines and guaiacols were responsible for the
"spicy, harsh-earthy" aroma of the Robusta coffee.
Quantification of selected odorants using a stable isotope dilution assay
confirmed the differences between the Arabica and Robusta coffees (brew)
found by GC/O.
Zusammenfassung
Die flüchtige Fraktion von Arabica- und Robusta-Röstkaffee (Pulver und Ge-
tränk) wurde durch Gaschromatographie-Olfaktometrie (GC/O) untersucht. Die
Analyse ergab 38 aromaaktive Verbindungen, von denen 32 identifiziert wur-
den.
Die beiden Kaffeesorten zeigten Unterschiede in der Konzentration die-
ser Aromastoffe.
Das Aroma des Arabica-Kaffees wird hauptsächlich durch Enoloxo-Verbindungen
(Sotolon, Abhexon, Furaneol und 3,4-Dimethyl-2-cyclopentenol-l-on) geprägt,
während im Robusta-Kaffee 3,5-Dimethyl-2-ethylpyrazin, 2,3-Diethyl-5-me-
thylpyrazin, 4-Ethyl- und 4-Vinylguajacol überwiegen. Die Bedeutung der
Enoloxo-Verbindungen nimmt im Arabica-Kaffeegetränk wegen der guten Wasser-
löslichkeit zu, so daß sier das süßlich-karamelartige Aroma verantwort-
lich sind. Die stechend-erdige Aromanote von Robusta-Kaffee wird dagegen
von Alkylpyrazinen und Guajacol-Derivaten geprägt.
128
Chimie/Biochimie
Quantitative Daten bestätigten die durch GC/O erhaltenen Ergebnisse in be-
zug auf die Unterschiede von Arabica- und Robusta-Kaffee
(Getränk).
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129
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Volatile Compounds in Food, Volume II, TNO-CIVO Food Analysis Institute
  • H Maarse
  • Ca Visscher
Maarse H, Visscher CA (1989) Volatile Compounds in Food, Volume II, TNO-CIVO Food Analysis Institute, Zeist, NL Guadagni DG, Buttery RG, Harris J (1966) J Sci Food Agric 17:142-144
  • W Holscher
  • O G Vitzthum
  • H Steinhart
Holscher W, Vitzthum OG, Steinhart H (1990) Lebensmittelchemie 45:12-13
  • R J Clarke
  • R Macrae
Clarke RJ, Macrae R (1985) In: Coffee (Vol. 1: Chemistry) Elsevier Applied Science Publishers, London, New York Vitzthum OG, Weisemann C, Becker R, Köhler HS (1990) Cafe Cacao The 34:27-36
In: Proceedings of the 2nd Wartburg Aroma Symposium. Characterization, production and application .of food flavours Akademie-Verlag
  • W Grosch
  • P Schieberle
Grosch W, Schieberle P (1988) In: Proceedings of the 2nd Wartburg Aroma Symposium. Characterization, production and application.of food flavours, Rothe M (Ed.), Akademie-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 139-151 [lo] Blank I, Fischer K-H, Grosch W (1989) Z Lebensm Unters Forsch 189:426- 433 [ll] Blank I, Grosch W (1991) J Food Sci 56:63-67
  • P Schieberle
  • W Grosch
Schieberle P, Grosch W (1987) J Agric Food Chem 35:252-257
  • O G Vitzthum
  • C Weisemann
  • R Becker
  • H S Köhler
Vitzthum OG, Weisemann C, Becker R, Köhler HS (1990) Cafe Cacao The 34:27-36