Article

Effect of calcium silicate on in vitro physiochemical properties and in vivo osteogenisis, degradability and bioactivity of porous β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics

Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233, People's Republic of China.
Biomedical Materials (Impact Factor: 3.7). 02/2013; 8(2):025008. DOI: 10.1088/1748-6041/8/2/025008
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Porous β-tricalcium phosphate(TCP)/calcium silicate(CS) composite bioceramics with different weight proportions were prepared to investigate the in vitro effects of CS on the physiochemical properties of TCP and the in vivo effects of CS on the degradability, osteogenesis and bioactivity of TCP. The physiochemical results showed that the addition of CS to porous TCP resulted in a looser and rougher surface and a lower solid density, compressive strength and Young's modulus and a lower pH value as compared to pure CS without any chemical interaction between the TCP and the CS. The in vivo study showed that the material degradation of porous TCP/CS composite bioceramics was slower than that of pure CS, although the osteogenesis, degradability and bioactivity were significantly increased in the long term. Thereafter, the introduction of CS into porous TCP bioceramics is an effective way to prepare bioactive bone grafting scaffolds for clinical use and to control properties such as in vivo degradability and osteoinduction of TCP.

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    • "Extensive studies have shown that CS can play a critical role in hard tissue formation as well as fast apatite formation ability [6] [7] [8], particularly incorporating the appropriate ratio of Si ions released from these CSbased biomaterials [9] [10] [11] [12]. Most importantly, CS has been widely applied for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), human dental pulp cells (hDPCs), and osteoblast-like cells for the enhancement of cell adhesion , proliferation, and tissue mineralization [13] [14] [15]. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    • "Extensive studies have shown that CS can play a critical role in hard tissue formation as well as fast apatite formation ability [6] [7] [8], particularly incorporating the appropriate ratio of Si ions released from these CSbased biomaterials [9] [10] [11] [12]. Most importantly, CS has been widely applied for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), human dental pulp cells (hDPCs), and osteoblast-like cells for the enhancement of cell adhesion , proliferation, and tissue mineralization [13] [14] [15]. "
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    ABSTRACT: In this research, sol–gel-derived nanostructured calcium magnesium silicate (merwinite)-based scaffolds were fabricated by water-based freeze casting method. The effect of cooling rate and sintering temperature on pore sizes and mechanical characteristics of the scaffolds was studied. Microstructure and surface morphology of scaffolds were also observed by scanning electron microscopy before and after various time intervals of soaking in simulated body fluid. The results showed that increasing temperature at the constant rate led to increasing the parameters of volume and linear shrinkage, strength (σ), and Young’s modulus (E) but decreasing porosity. This increase was significant for strength and Young’s modulus. In addition, with the increase of rate at the constant temperature, the parameters of volume and linear shrinkage and also porosity decreased whereas strength and Young’s modulus increased significantly. According to the obtained mechanical results, the best mechanical properties were achieved when the scaffold was prepared at cooling rate and sintering temperature of 277.15°K/min and 1623.15°K, respectively (E = 0.048 GPa and σ = 2 MPa). These values were closer to the lower limit of the values for cancellous bone. The acellular in vitro bioactivity revealed that different apatite morphologies were formed on the surfaces for various periods of soaking time when the scaffolds prepared at the freezing temperature of 277.15°K/min and at the two different sintering temperatures. The favorable mechanical behavior of the porous constructs, coupled with the ability of forming apatite particles on the surface of scaffold, indicates the potential of the present freeze casting route for the production of porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.
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