Article

Glucocerebrosidase in the pathogenesis and treatment of Parkinson disease: Fig. 1.

Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University College London Institute of Neurology, London NW3 2PF, United Kingdom.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.67). 02/2013; 110(9):3214-5. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1300822110
Source: PubMed
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    • "Ambroxol hydrochloride increases glucosylceramidase activity in control, Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease with GBA mutation cell lines, by activating components of the CLEAR network Ambroxol activates lysosomal biogenesis Brain 2014: 137; 1481–1495 | 1493 through TFEB combined with chaperone activity (Supplementary Fig. 2). The ability of ambroxol to increase glucosylceramidase in control cells and to reduce alpha-synuclein levels in a cell model highlights the potential benefits of manipulating the glucosylceramidase pathway to lower synuclein levels in synuclein related diseases (Schapira and Gegg, 2013). "
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    ABSTRACT: Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene, which encodes the lysosomal hydrolase glucosylceramidase. Patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers are at increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Indeed, glucocerebrosidase mutations are the most frequent risk factor for Parkinson's disease in the general population. Therefore there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms by which glucocerebrosidase mutations predispose to neurodegeneration to facilitate development of novel treatments. To study this we generated fibroblast lines from skin biopsies of five patients with Gaucher disease and six heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers with and without Parkinson's disease. Glucosylceramidase protein and enzyme activity levels were assayed. Oxidative stress was assayed by single cell imaging of dihydroethidium. Glucosylceramidase enzyme activity was significantly reduced in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (median 5% of controls, P = 0.0001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of controls, P = 0.001) and without (56% of controls, P = 0.001) Parkinson's disease compared with controls. Glucosylceramidase protein levels, assessed by western blot, were significantly reduced in fibroblasts from Gaucher disease (median glucosylceramidase levels 42% of control, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of control, P < 0.001) and without (median 68% of control, P < 0.001) Parkinson's disease. Single cell imaging of dihydroethidium demonstrated increased production of cytosolic reactive oxygen species in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 62% compared to controls, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 68% compared with controls, P < 0.001) and without (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 70% compared with controls, P < 0.001) Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that treatment with the molecular chaperone ambroxol hydrochloride would improve these biochemical abnormalities. Treatment with ambroxol hydrochloride increased glucosylceramidase activity in fibroblasts from healthy controls, Gaucher disease and heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers with and without Parkinson's disease. This was associated with a significant reduction in dihydroethidium oxidation rate of ∼50% (P < 0.05) in fibroblasts from controls, Gaucher disease and heterozygous mutation carriers with and without Parkinson's disease. In conclusion, glucocerebrosidase mutations are associated with reductions in glucosylceramidase activity and evidence of oxidative stress. Ambroxol treatment significantly increases glucosylceramidase activity and reduces markers of oxidative stress in cells bearing glucocerebrosidase mutations. We propose that ambroxol hydrochloride should be further investigated as a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Brain
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    ABSTRACT: α-Synuclein (SNCA) is a substantive component of Lewy bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The discovery and subsequent derivation of its role in PD has led to a suprising but fruitful convergence of the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics. In particular, the manipulation of the cell lines of a number of forms of familial PD has implicated SNCA in distinct and diverse biochemical pathways related to its pathogenesis. This current and rapidly evolving concept indicates PD is a disease in which interacting pathways of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired regulation of protein turnover interact to cause dopaminergic cell dysfunction and death. SNCA has a central role in these processes and manipulation of its expression, degradation and aggregation appear to be promising neuroprotective therapeutic targets.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Molecular Neurobiology
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