Article

Nutritional Quality of Legumes, and Their Role in Cardiometabolic Risk Prevention: A Review

Laboratory of Clinical and Metabolic Nutrition, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Oran , Oran, Algeria .
Journal of medicinal food (Impact Factor: 1.63). 02/2013; 16(3). DOI: 10.1089/jmf.2011.0238
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Abstract Legumes (including alfalfa, clover, lupins, green beans and peas, peanuts, soybeans, dry beans, broad beans, dry peas, chickpeas, and lentils) represent an important component of the human diet in several areas of the world, especially in the developing countries, where they complement the lack of proteins from cereals, roots, and tubers. In some regions of the world, legume seeds are the only protein supply in the diet. The health benefits of legume consumption have received rising interest from researchers, and their consumption and production extends worldwide. Among European countries, higher legume consumption is observed around the Mediterranean, with per capita daily consumption between 8 and 23 g, while in Northern Europe, the daily consumption is less than 5 g per capita. The physiological effects of different legumes vary significantly. These differences may result from the polysaccharides composition, in particular, the quantity and variety of dietary fibers and starch, protein make-up, and variability in phytochemical content. The majority of legumes contain phytochemicals: bioactive compounds, including enzyme inhibitors, phytohemagglutinins (lectins), phytoestrogens, oligosaccharides, saponins, and phenolic compounds, which play metabolic roles in humans who frequently consume these foods. Dietary intake of phytochemicals may provide health benefits, protecting against numerous diseases or disorders, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and inflammation. The synergistic or antagonistic effects of these phytochemical mixtures from food legumes, their interaction with other components of the diet, and the mechanism of their action have remained a challenge with regard to understanding the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. Their mitigating effects and the mechanism of their action need to be further addressed if we are to understand the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. This review provides an overview of the nutritional quality of legumes and their potential contribution in cardiometabolic risk prevention.

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    • "Legumes are commonly used in cuisines worldwide. Especially for vegetarians, legumes act as an important part of their diet as they can provide a good source of proteins [1]. "
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    ABSTRACT: A lectin exhibiting antiproliferative activity on tumor cell lines but devoid of antifungal activity has been purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Green Dragon no. 8 seeds. The lectin was a 60 kDa dimeric protein with two 30 kDa subunits. It was a glucosamine-specific lectin as implied from the inhibitory effect of glucosamine on hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. The steps for isolation of the lectin involved Affi-gel blue gel (affinity gel), Mono Q (anion exchanger), and Superdex 75 column (size exclusion). The lectin was purified 20.8-fold from the crude extract of the beans. The purified lectin showed antiproliferative activity on breast cancer MCF7 cell line and nasopharyngeal cancer HONE1 and CNE2 cell lines, but a low activity on normal skin fibroblast HSF98 cell line. The lectin was shown to induce apoptosis on HONE1 cells, as indicated by increased phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization. It also blocked HONE1 cell division and kept the cells at the G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
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    • "Even, lentil extracts (1:0) (Fig. 6) demonstrated higher cytoprotective effect with respect to pure Ss-I, indicating that the components of extracts could interact synergistically, increasing protective effects. It is demonstrated that the interactions about the components of the mixtures in food can produce synergistic effects which improve their bioactive properties (Bouchenak and Lamri-Senhadji, 2013; Kang et al., 2010; Wang et al., 2011), probably due to other functional lentil components, such as isoflavones and polyphenols (Oomah et al., 2011; Sarkar and Li, 2003). Cytoprotective effects of Ss-I and extracts could be explained by antioxidant defense mechanism of soyasaponins against cytotoxicity induced by AOH. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2015
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    • "Even, lentil extracts (1:0) (Fig. 6) demonstrated higher cytoprotective effect with respect to pure Ss-I, indicating that the components of extracts could interact synergistically, increasing protective effects. It is demonstrated that the interactions about the components of the mixtures in food can produce synergistic effects which improve their bioactive properties (Bouchenak and Lamri-Senhadji, 2013; Kang et al., 2010; Wang et al., 2011), probably due to other functional lentil components, such as isoflavones and polyphenols (Oomah et al., 2011; Sarkar and Li, 2003). Cytoprotective effects of Ss-I and extracts could be explained by antioxidant defense mechanism of soyasaponins against cytotoxicity induced by AOH. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2015
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