Product attachment and satisfaction: Understanding consumers' post-purchase behavior

ArticleinJournal of Consumer Marketing 27(3):271-282 · May 2010with 723 Reads 
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Abstract
Purpose – Past research on consumers' post‐purchase behavior has focused on understanding satisfaction. However, the consumer‐product relationship is much broader. This paper aims to deal with another aspect of post‐purchase behavior: the emotional bond consumers experience with their durables during ownership. The paper contributes to the literature on this topic by testing a conceptual model of product attachment and its relationships with satisfaction, and the determinants: utility, appearance, and memories. Design/methodology/approach – Two experiments are presented in which the product categories photo cameras and mobile phones were used as stimuli to test the conceptual model. Findings – Results show that the product's utility and its appearance positively affect both product attachment and satisfaction. For both product attachment and satisfaction, the pleasure elicited mediates the effects of utility and appearance. Only for product attachment, the presence of memories serves as an additional determinant that also moderates the effects of utility and appearance. Importantly, satisfaction has no direct effect on product attachment. Originality/value – The paper contributes to the lack of knowledge concerning consumers' post‐purchase behavior by exploring the relationships between product attachment and satisfaction.

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  • ... Even though people are likely to have positive emotions towards a product to which they feel attached [77], product attachment is not an emotion or an effect [9,54,80]. Likewise, product attachment is not possessiveness [64], product involvement [9,64], product loyalty [64], brand attitude [91], or brand attachment [64]. ...
    ... Even though people are likely to have positive emotions towards a product to which they feel attached [77], product attachment is not an emotion or an effect [9,54,80]. Likewise, product attachment is not possessiveness [64], product involvement [9,64], product loyalty [64], brand attitude [91], or brand attachment [64]. ...
    ... Even though people are likely to have positive emotions towards a product to which they feel attached [77], product attachment is not an emotion or an effect [9,54,80]. Likewise, product attachment is not possessiveness [64], product involvement [9,64], product loyalty [64], brand attitude [91], or brand attachment [64]. ...
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    Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human characteristics to a non-human object. Past research shows that anthropomorphism changes how we perceive objects (e.g., believing them to be more attractive). Does this mean we would be willing to pay more for them? We examined whether displaying a product in an anthropomorphized form influenced how much a consumer was willing to pay. We examined two design aspects, visual (i.e., a face) and auditory (e.g., a voice), in the context of an online auction, and proposed three theoretical routes by which an anthropomorphic product display might affect willingness to pay (emotional, product attachment, and product quality). Results show that adding visual anthropomorphizing features to the way a product was displayed increased the amount bid by 7 percent, but adding auditory anthropomorphizing features had no effect. The visual anthropomorphizing features increased product attachment but had no effect on emotions or perceptions of product quality. Therefore, we conclude that anthropomorphizing the way a product is displayed increases willingness to pay primarily through the theoretical route of creating attachment to the product. There is an additional, as yet undiscovered, theoretical route through which anthropomorphism influences willingness to pay. The results also suggest that the conventional wisdom that the combination of visual and auditory design features is best for triggering anthropomorphism is not always true.
  • ... The reference to attachment has been either indirect or not completely acknowledged. Current studies on attachment in marketing have studied consumers' attachment to products (Ball & Tasaki, 1992;Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010) and to human brands (Loroz & Braig, 2015;Thomson, 2006). Table 1 provides the existing constructs that illustrate definitions, context, and operationalisation of attachment. ...
    ... Attachment between the consumer and the celebrity is labelled as 'human-brand attachment'. Product attachment research has in general described consumers' attachment to products according to the type of object and stage of ownership (Ball & Tasaki, 1992), existence of an emotional connection between the consumer and the product (Schifferstein & Zwartkruis-Pelgrim, 2008), and various determinants of a product from its appearance to utility (Mugge et al., 2010). Human-brand attachment research, on the other hand, has described interpersonal relationship and attachment styles to characterise consumers' attachment to celebrities (David & Bearden, 2017;Ilicic et al., 2016;Thomson, 2006). ...
    ... However, at least five studies cited below have indicated in their future research scope that perhaps greater attention should be paid to attachment between the endorsement triad (consumer-celebrity-product) and, more specifically, between the endorser and the product. (Ball & Tasaki, 1992) Attachment between a consumer and a brand varies with the type of object and stage of ownership Consumer-Product (Schifferstein & Zwartkruis-Pelgrim, 2008) Attachment indicates the existence of an emotional tie between a person and an object Consumer-Product (Mugge et al., 2010) Products' appearance and utility positively affect attachment and satisfaction Consumer-Product (David & Bearden, 2017) Consumers' interpersonal attachment styles impact purchase intention of products depicted in ads Consumer-Product (Whan Park et al., 2010) Brand attachment is strongly related to the emotional indicator of attachment and separation distress Consumer-Product (Malär et al., 2011) Brands with actual self-congruence generated higher levels of emotional brand attachment Consumer-Product (Thomson et al., 2012) Attachment styles predict consumers' reactions after brand relationships end Consumer-Product (Bidmon, 2017) Attachment style impacts brand attachment and can be leveraged to create emotional bonds with brands Consumer-Product (Thomson et al., 2005) Devised a scale to measure emotional attachment (EA) between the consumer and the brand Consumer-Product (Fedorikhin et al., 2008) Parent brand attachment affects consumers' reactions to brand extension transgressions Consumer-Product (Jimenez & Voss, 2010) EA and self-concept maintenance interact to predict purchase intention Consumer-Product (Grisaffe and Nguyen, 2011) Developed five antecedents to understand EAs between consumers and brands Consumer-Celebrity (Thomson, 2006) Extending attachment theory to include autonomy, relatedness, and competence (i.e. A-R-C) Consumer-Celebrity (Loroz & Braig, 2015) Using A-R-C as attachment antecedents and brand personality appeal to understand attachment to celebrities Consumer-Celebrity (Ilicic et al., 2016) Examining parasocial relationships between consumers and celebrities within the attachment framework Consumer-Celebrity (Escalas & Bettman, 2017) Examining parasocial relationships using need to belong and self-identity as consumers seeking meaning from brands in endorsements Ohanian (1991) and Till and Busler (1998), in their directions for future research, recommend special attention to celebrities who have direct connection with their endorsed product and who are perceived to be experts by the target audiences, or in other words, celebrities who have an ongoing attachment with the product. ...
    Article
    The construct of attachment has received increased attention in the marketing literature in recent years, although its applications in product endorsement remain largely unexplored. Endorsement researchers have applied the construct in piecemeal fashion, examining the attachment either between consumer and product or between consumer and celebrity. None of these studies have looked at both these dimensions of attachment in one study or included the attachment between the celebrity and product. The present paper reconciles the previous literature to propose the tripartite attachment model that considers all three entities of an endorsement—consumer, celebrity and product, and encompasses the flow of meaning and attachment in this triad. This proposed model extends the McCracken meaning transfer model to incorporate the three attachment nodes that illustrate the flow of attachment in the endorsement triad. Finally, we make several marketing propositions about how attachment is associated with the consumer, celebrity and product to ensure a meaningful endorsement transaction.
  • ... Ketika seseorang menyukai merek tertentu akan membuat konsumen selalu mengenang sesuatu yang disukainya. Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans (2010), mengamati sebuah kenangan yang berhubungan kuat antara merek dan pengalaman keterikatan Kleine, III, & Allen (1995); (Schifferstein & Zwartkruis-Pelgrim, 2008). Penelitian sebelumnya, Mugge et al (2010) berfokus pada kepuasan konsumen yang memiliki keterikatan dengan produk. ...
    ... Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans (2010), mengamati sebuah kenangan yang berhubungan kuat antara merek dan pengalaman keterikatan Kleine, III, & Allen (1995); (Schifferstein & Zwartkruis-Pelgrim, 2008). Penelitian sebelumnya, Mugge et al (2010) berfokus pada kepuasan konsumen yang memiliki keterikatan dengan produk. Dalam penelitiannya, variabel kenangan (memory) merupakan variabel moderasi antara utilitas produk dan appearance pada keterikatan produk. ...
    ... Dalam penelitiannya, variabel kenangan (memory) merupakan variabel moderasi antara utilitas produk dan appearance pada keterikatan produk. Hasil penelitian Mugge et al (2010) menyatakan bahwa kondisi kenangan diprediksi lebih terikat dibandingkan dengan kondisi dimana seseorang memiliki kenangan yang lemah. Namun, dalam penelitian ini memasukkan variabel kenangan sebagai moderasi antara pengaruh kualitas merek yang dipersepsikan dan variabel kepribadian merek pada kecintaan merek dengan merubah keterikatan produk menjadi kecintaan merek. ...
    Article
    This research aims to examine the effect of perceived brand quality and brand personality on brand fondness with memories as moderator. This study examines the effect of independent variables on dependent variable with memories as moderating variable. The subject in this research were students, civil servants, professionals (nuns, accountants), entrepreneurs, private employees whom are users of Asus brand laptop in Indonesia. The sample were chosen by using nonprobability sampling technique namely purposive sampling. The instrument of this study was online questionnaire and the gathered data is analyzed by using multiple regression analysis. The finding of this study explains that perceived brand quality and brand personality have a positive effect on brand fondness. Brand fondness has a positive effect on brand loyalty and active engagement. The finding on moderation variables explains that memories are not proven to moderate the effect between perceived brand quality and brand fondness, it means that the magnitude of memory as a moderating variable has nothing to do with the relationship between independent variables and dependent variable. In addition, the finding of variable memories proved to moderate the effect between brand personality and brand fondness, it means that it will strongly influence the relationship between brand personality and brand fondness when the variable memory is high, otherwise it will become weak when the variable memory is low. Keywords: Perceived brand quality, brand personality, brand love, brand loyalty, active engagement, memories.Anteseden dan Konsekuensi Kecintaan Merek dengan Dimoderasi oleh KenanganAbstrakPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji pengaruh kualitas merek yang dipersepsikan dan kepribadian merek pada kecintaan merek dengan kenangan sebagai pemoderasi. Subjek dalam penelitian ini adalah mahasiswa, PNS, profesional (suster, akuntan), wiraswasta, karyawan swasta yang merupakan pengguna laptop merek Asus di Indoensia. Sampel yang dipilih menggunakan teknik nonprobability sampling dengan jenis purposive sampling. Instrumen penelitian ini adalah kuesioner yang dibuat secara online dan dianalisis dengan analisis regresi berganda. Penelitian ini menemukan bahwa kualitas merek yang dipersepsikan dan kepribadian merek memiliki pengaruh positif pada kecintaan merek. Kecintaan merek memiliki pengaruh positif pada loyalitas merek dan keterlibatan aktif. Temuan pada variabel moderasi, kenangan tidak terbukti memoderasi pengaruh antara kualitas merek yang dipersepsikan dan kecintaan merek, artinya bahwa tinggi atau rendahnya kenangan sebagai variabel moderasi tidak ada kaitannya pada hubungan antara variabel independen dan variabel dependen. Selain itu, temuan variabel kenangan terbukti memoderasi pengaruh antara kepribadian merek dan kecintaan merek, artinya bahwa akan menjadi kuat pengaruh kepribadian merek pada kecintaan merek ketika variabel kenangan tinggi, dan sebaliknya akan menjadi lemah ketika variabel kenangan rendah. Kata kunci: Kualitas merek yang dipersepsikan, kepribadian merek, kecintaan merek, loyalitas merek, keterlibatan aktif, kenangan positif.
  • ... Finally, if consumers show certain behaviors indicating brand attachment, then variables such as repurchase behavior, word of mouth, and giving recommendations shown in Big Data can be helpful in order to predicting consumer behaviors. In the study of the product deformation behavior of consumers, it was shown that product attachment is related to the consumers' product deformation behaviors (Joo et al., 2013; Mugge, Schifferstein & Schoormans, 2010) [25]. In addition, consumers are more likely to purchase quality and necessary products. ...
    ... The direct behaviors seen by consumers who are attached to the brand can be product use expansion and/or product upgrade behaviors. In other words, if a consumer feels an attachment to a product, then he or she will want to have a more personalized product, so that he or she can behave themselves to solve a functional problem for a product with a brand attachment (Mugge, Schoormans, & Schifferstein, 2005[26]; Mugge et al., 2010) [25]. Consumers who are attached to their own brands are willing to use the upgraded iPhone brand because they want to use their brand extensively to expand their use and continue to upgrade. ...
    ... The direct behaviors seen by consumers who are attached to the brand can be product use expansion and/or product upgrade behaviors. In other words, if a consumer feels an attachment to a product, then he or she will want to have a more personalized product, so that he or she can behave themselves to solve a functional problem for a product with a brand attachment (Mugge, Schoormans, & Schifferstein, 2005[26]; Mugge et al., 2010) [25]. Consumers who are attached to their own brands are willing to use the upgraded iPhone brand because they want to use their brand extensively to expand their use and continue to upgrade. ...
  • ... There are two main types of consumer value, utilitarian, and hedonic. Utilitarian value refers to the instrumental or practical value, such as product quality or the ability to effectively perform a task [119]. Hedonic value includes an effective component and it accounts for the experiential value based on an effective definition of experience. ...
    ... Hedonic value includes an effective component and it accounts for the experiential value based on an effective definition of experience. In an empirical study, the role experiential features in relation to product success of a selection of well-known products were tested [25,[119][120][121]. The results showed that the experiential features contribute to the value recognized by customers. ...
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    The purpose of the undertaken study is to examine the effectiveness of online digital media advertising as a strategic tool for building brand sustainability. For this purpose, we investigate the impact of different channels of online media, such as email marketing, mobile phone marketing, search engine optimization and companies' websites, and social media marketing for the effectiveness of online digital media advertising. Moreover, the researchers have introduced eight mediating variables and six moderating variables to examine the impact between exogenous variables and online digital media advertising (endogenous). The researchers have taken 910 responses through a modified questionnaire and employed quantitative research methods, such as the structural equation modeling, exploratory factor and confirmatory factor analyses, and Hayes process approach for examining the mediation and moderation amongst the variables. The results of direct impact have demonstrated that all of the channels of digital media advertising have a positive and significant influence on the effectiveness of online digital media that creates brand sustainability for fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) and services sectors of Pakistan. The outcomes of hypotheses pertaining to the mediating and moderating effects of different variables have shown the significant influence between exogenous variables and endogenous variable. The results of the undertaken study are beneficial for the existing literature that provides the basic foil for future research studies. Moreover, the results have significant industrial implications for the marketers and digital media managers that they can devise effective media and marketing strategies to maintain optimum market share and competitive advantages.
  • ... Therefore, consumers regard the brand as personally significant and connect the brand with themselves through its provision of hedonic value (Mikulincer and Shaver, 2005). Product quality and perceived happiness will positively influence the formation of brand attachment (Mugge et al., 2010). Hedonism positively affects consumer brand attachment. ...
    ... Possessions with sentimental value may become extensions of the self, but an object that is an extension of the self does not necessarily have sentimental value. Sentimental value is related to brand attachment, sentimental value can reflect consumers' preference for product experience (Kleine and Baker, 2004;Mugge et al., 2010). Sentimental value may lead to product attachment, but the two are different constructs. ...
  • ... Also, sensory benefits such as taste and smell in a restaurant can increase emotional attachment to the restaurant. In the context of product attachment, Mugge et al. (2010) found that if a product offers superior utilitarian and hedonic benefits, consumers perceive a product as being more valuable and significant to them than other products, thus further contributing to the development of an emotional attachment. Similarly, if consumers perceive extrinsic and intrinsic benefits from a mass customized product, they will experience strong product attachment. ...
    ... The perceived benefits associated with a customized product can lead to greater emotional attachment to that product, a more positive attitude toward the customization program, and ultimately high loyalty intentions. Consistent with findings of previous research in this area (Kang and Kim, 2012;Lee, 2009;Mugge et al., 2010;Park et al., 2010;Schreier, 2006), consumers who perceive greater extrinsic and intrinsic benefits because the customized products match their preferences feel emotionally attached to the product and have a positive attitude toward the mass customization program. In particular, the present study found an indirect effect of emotional product attachment on loyalty intentions through attitudes toward the customization program, providing evidence for the mediating role of attitudes toward the customization program as a way to enhance customer loyalty. ...
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    The objective of this study was to explore impacts and benefits of mass customized products on emotional product attachment, favorable attitudes toward a mass customization program, and the ongoing effect on loyalty intentions. This study further investigated how benefits, attachment, attitudes, and loyalty intentions differed as a function of involvement and fashion innovativeness. 290 female online shoppers in South Korea participated in an online survey. Results of this study revealed that perceived benefits positively influenced emotional product attachment and attitudes toward a mass customization program. In addition, attachment positively influenced attitudes, which in turn affected loyalty intentions. This study also found that benefits, attachment, attitudes, and loyalty intentions were all higher in highly involved consumers (high fashion innovators) than those in less involved consumers (low fashion innovators). This study concludes with theoretical and practical implications for mass customization programs.
  • ... Attachment is an independent concept, but is correlated with trust, satisfaction and commitment (Thomson, 2006;Mugge et al., 2010). An attachment to an object is defined as the extent to which an object is owned, expected to be owned or previously owned by an individual and is used by that individual to maintain his or her self-concept (Ball & Tasaki, 1992). ...
    ... Increased brand loyalty, a willingness to pay a premium price for the brand, and engage in word of mouth advertising for the brand are also possible outcomes of an intense emotional attachment which brand love is (Albert & Merunka, 2013). Consumers with intense emotional attachments to a brand may go to greater lengths to preserve their products by handling them carefully and repairing them when they break, rather than throwing them out (Mugge et al., 2010). Consumers will also spend more cognitive resources thinking about a brand when intensely attached and participate in brand communities (Whan Park et al., 2006). ...
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    Full-text available
    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the literature about the four factors of Keller's brand resonance theory: behavioural loyalty, attitudinal attachment, a sense of community and active engagement, and theoretically apply them to video games, a growth industry. Method: Searches were conducted in multi-discipline peer reviewed journals to review the literature on brand resonance. Peer reviewed journal articles, news articles, comments in forums and blogs and consumer created content were examined to theoretically apply the theory to the video game industry. Findings: Whilst this paper is not empirical in nature, it seeks to show that the four factors of brand resonance are worthwhile exploring and can be theoretically applied to diverse brands such as video games. Originality: This paper presents the first detailed examination of the literature on the four factors of Keller's brand resonance theory and their theoretical application to the video game industry.
  • ... And UGT sheds light on new opportunities for purchasing products on SNS (Baek, Cho, & Kim, 2014;Zhang, Shabbir, & Abro, 2015). In particular, attachment to the products of mobile phones is closely related to consumers' purchase of the mobile devices (Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010). Likewise, authentic experience of a wine place is significantly associated with consumers' wine purchase (Moulard, Babin, & Griffin, 2015). ...
    ... As predicted by IDT, consumers in online travel community have higher intention to purchase than those not in an online travel community because the former offers attributes of innovation more likely to adopt such as relative advantages, compatibility, and ease of use (Agag & El-Masry, 2016). Attachment to a product is extended to brand attachment because consumers are more eager to buy products bearing the same brand and attached consumers are more likely to recommend the same brand products to others (Mugge et al., 2010). SNS has created new opportunities for collecting product purchase information and UGT has been extended to take advantage of this more detailed data on whether SNS users purchase products or not via SNS (Zhang et al., 2015). ...
  • ... Los heurísticos de apego han sido desarrollados basándonos en el trabajo de (Mugge, Schoormans, & Schifferstein, 2008). El apego como fuente de placer ha sido investigado por (Klcinc & Baker, 2004;Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010;Schifferstein & Zwartkruis-Pelgrim, 2008). Sentimos apego cuando un producto continúa generándonos emociones positivas por largo tiempo después de haber sido adquirido. ...
    ... Sentimos apego cuando un producto continúa generándonos emociones positivas por largo tiempo después de haber sido adquirido. El apego es interesante como estrategia ya que si el producto llega a su fin de vida o el usuario lo pierde, es bien probable que recompre la marca o el mismo producto original (Mugge et al., 2010;Schifferstein & Zwartkruis-Pelgrim, 2008). La figura 7 muestra bocetos originales de aplicación de los heurísticos de apego. ...
  • ... With time, the owner may develop affection and even feel attached to the car (Dant, 2004;Sheller, 2004). Main contributors to attachment were found to be related to exceptional functionality of a product or memories built through product's lifecycle (Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010). Product attachment and affection can be powerful tools used in favour in strengthening the customer-brand relationship (Kumar, Townsend and Vhrhies, 2014;Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010), and influence re-purchase (Baltas and Saridakis, 2013). ...
    ... Main contributors to attachment were found to be related to exceptional functionality of a product or memories built through product's lifecycle (Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010). Product attachment and affection can be powerful tools used in favour in strengthening the customer-brand relationship (Kumar, Townsend and Vhrhies, 2014;Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010), and influence re-purchase (Baltas and Saridakis, 2013). ...
    Conference Paper
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    The automotive industry is facing multiple challenges. Moving towards more environmentally friendly vehicles, new models of vehicle ownership, and associated changes in consumers’ expectations and attitudes are amongst the most significant ones. Understanding how these trends are affecting customers’ expectations is fundamental for attracting and retaining consumers. Although researchers have explored automotive purchase factors for many years, there appears to be little agreement regarding the relative importance of these factors, and often incomplete and contradicting findings are observed. This paper reports preliminary findings from two studies designed to better understand vehicle attributes influencing customers’ purchase decisions and satisfaction. The first study consisted of a review of sources to develop a comprehensive overview of relevant and clearly defined vehicle attributes describing the automotive product. The resulting list was applied in a second study to evaluate in an automotive context the idea that the importance of product attributes varies throughout the customer journey. Results indicated that the relative importance of vehicle attributes dramatically differed depending on the stage within the customer journey. The findings are discussed in the context of managing the product evaluation and development process.
  • ... The other result is that consumers not have strong levels of brand loyalty towards their brands and the three dimensions of brand romance have significant effect on brand loyalty. Some other authors have perceived emotional attachment to brand differently (Mugge et al., 2010;Belaid and Behi, 2011;Hwang and Kandampully, 2012). Although emotional attachment to brand has been a topic of interest recently (Thomson et al., 2005), there is limited studies about brand romance as emotional attachment (Patwardhan and Balasubramanian, 2011;Sarkar, 2011;Sarkar et al., 2012;Amin and Malin, 2012;Kruger et al., 2013;Petzer et al., 2014). ...
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    Consumers’ loyalty to a brand depends on their establishing an emotional relationship with it. This relationship may be called as brand romance. Many factors influence the emergence of brand romance (ROM), including brand novelty (BN), brand satisfaction (BS), and subjective brand knowledge (SBK). The present study evaluates brand romance dimensions such as pleasure, arousal and dominance in terms of these antecedents and outcomes as attitudinal and behavioral brand loyalty. The study was carried out with 295 consumers in Istanbul/Turkey via face-to-face questionnaires. In this study, BS, SBK, and BN have a positive influence on arousal and pleasure dimensions of brand romance whereas the effect of SBK is not statistically significant on dominance dimension of brand romance. Also arousal and dominance dimensions of brand romance are positively effective on behavioral and attitudinal loyalty whereas pleasure dimension is not statistically significant on behavioral loyalty
  • ... Numerous attachment targets have been identified in the marketing literature including human brands, such as celebrities (Thomson 2006), leader figures (Davidovitz et al. 2007), pets, objects (Ball and Tasaki 1992), and places of residence (Hill and Stamey 1990). Although attachment is an independent concept, it has been positively correlated with trust, satisfaction, and commitment (Thomson 2006;Mugge, Schifferstein, and Schoormans 2010). The emotional significance of an attachment will increase as the length of its ownership increases (Ball and Tasaki 1992) but will weaken if a brand loses its capacity to gratify, enrich, and enforce the relationship with the consumer (Park, MacInnis, and Priester 2006). ...
    Article
    This study applies the concepts of brand resonance and brand transgression to the brand management of a political leader and, for the first time, proposes a framework linking these two concepts. Qualitative analysis was used to examine the case of Kevin Rudd, a former, once popular, Australian Prime Minister (2007–2010, 2013), and found that Rudd’s brand resonance was harmed as a result of a brand transgression. Specifically, a thematic analysis and semistructured interviews indicated that Rudd supporters’ behavioral loyalty, sense of community, and active engagement declined. This study provides support for the proposed framework and a base for future research in this area.
  • ... Recently, however, academics across several disciplines have explored various aspects of product longevity (e.g. Cooper, 2010;Gregson and Crewe, 2003;Mugge et al., 2010;Murakami et al., 2010;Oguchi et al., 2010) and the British Government has begun to take an interest in product longevity as a means of increasing resource efficiency and reducing waste (Defra, 2011a;ERM, 2011). ...
  • ... Understanding of issues relating to product lifetimes has increased in recent times. Publications by Chapman (2005) on emotionally durable design and Mugge et al. (2010) on user attachment have explored consumers' relationships with their possession. Vezzoli and Manzini (2008) have compiled a checklist of design principles for product life optimisation. ...
  • ... al., 2003;Read, Robertson & McQuilken, 2011). In HCI (human computer interface) study, researchers say that consumers have the attachment also for the digital product, and just the degree and the kinds of determinants are different from analogue one (Mugge, Schiffersteine & Schoormans, 2010;Read, McQuilken & Robertson, 2010;Qi & Fu, 2011). ...
    Article
    Full-text available
    Stylus pen (hereinafter, stylus) is an auxiliary tool for the direct input through display simulating human pencil activities over papers. In a vein of new product development strategy of IT industry, it is known that new product features don't just offer benefits to consumer but also inconveniences due to additional complexities. In order to evaluate the benefit and loss of the stylus, we researchers suggest a new causality model represented with the structural equation and test the model which the stylus effect to the device value with survey data from the Korean smartphone consumers. For the empirical test, we categorize their various consumer experience as three groups as icon, competence, and novelty. As the bounded rational factors and as a mediating variable, we introduce the consumer attachment, and we set the extent of stylus pen use as a discrete moderating variable. The active stylus users have stronger attachment and repurchase intent than the inactive users. They also have the higher score in experience, notably in icon and novelty than the others. For the active users, their attachment mediates in part positively the relation from icon and novelty to repurchase intent and mitigates the negative effect from novelty experience to repurchase intention. The researchers argue the new product strategy of equipment stylus pen into smartphone works properly in the Korean market. The embedded pen helps to induce current user to buy the same series again. The methods and research model suggested in the paper can be applied as a tool for new product evaluation.
  • ... Among these, semi-structured interview technique turned out to be the most appropriate based on the study requirements in this PhD (see Table 8 and Appendix J). Product attachment or product-user relationship has been empirically studied extensively by Mugge et al. (2004Mugge et al. ( , 2006aMugge et al. ( , 2010). The decision was therefore made to use these existing studies (based on questionnaires) for investigating the relationship between upcycling, product attachment and product longevity (question 4). ...
    Thesis
    Full-text available
    Upcycling is the creation or modification of a product from used materials, components and products which is of equal or higher quality or value than the original. Scaling-up upcycling, in theory, contributes ultimately to reducing carbon emissions by extending lifetimes of used materials, components and products, and thereby decreasing embodied energy. This PhD focuses on the emerging household behaviour of upcycling as niche environmentally significant behaviour. It aims to understand the current upcycling behaviour and factors that influence behaviour in order to develop design and policy interventions to influence behaviour in order to upscale upcycling. Interviews, a short questionnaire study, a survey and use of a ‘semi-Delphi’ method (a questionnaire study followed by a workshop with experts) were employed. The interviews provided insights into current upcycling behaviour (e.g. approaches to and context for upcycling), behavioural factors influencing upcycling, and potential differences arising from demographic characteristics. The short questionnaire study showed that upcycling has potential to create high attachment leading to product longevity. The survey revealed UK-specific key behavioural factors of upcycling (intention, attitude and subjective norm) and the potential target groups for scaling- up (people in art and design aged 30 years or older) based on group differences. Synthesising the data from the interviews and surveys, 15 promising design and policy interventions for upscaling upcycling were formulated. These interventions were subsequently explored and evaluated through the semi-Delphi study. The outcome pinpointed the suitable actor(s) for each intervention and sets of important and feasible interventions for short-term and long-term success in scaling-up. This research contributes further to knowledge in design for sustainable behaviour by suggesting interventions beyond product and communication design to influence behaviour, and demonstrating novel use of mixed methods consumer research based on a behaviour model and an existing framework for behaviour understanding and intervention. The research also contributes to knowledge in upcycling theory and practice by providing behavioural insights, factors influencing upcycling and promising interventions for upscaling upcycling in the UK. Finally, a contribution was made to consumer behaviour theory by suggesting and testing a new combination model to understand behaviour.
  • ... Other studies support this link to loss aversion (Baer & Brown, 2012;Kahneman & Knetsch, 1991) and highlight additional consequences of attachment such as higher evaluation (Franke, Schreier & Kaiser, 2010;Reb & Connolly, 2007) and feelings of stewardship (Hernandez, 2012). In a wider perspective, we see psychological ownership theory useful in providing a coherent model for attachment (Baxter, Aurisicchio & Childs, 2015a), the elements of which are stressed in a number of design-oriented attachment studies (Mugge, Schifferstein & Schoormans, 2010, 2006Mugge, Schoormans & Schifferstein, 2009;Desmet & Hekkert, 2007;Norton, Mochon & Ariely, 2011). Beyond perhaps other approaches, this approach discusses the paths and processes of attachment and detachment (referred to in this paper at times as possession and dispossession) such that design can deal with both. ...
    Chapter
    Full-text available
    The notion of possession is one of the most fundamental concepts that guide everyday behaviour. Paradoxically, it is often poorly understood. This is particularly true in a circular context where consumer interactions with possessions are being altered and in some cases redefined. Thus, an understanding of possession serves as a useful, if not necessary, prerequisite to designing circular products, services and systems. This chapter explores the idea of possession: what it is, how an object becomes one and why it is important for the circular economy. Possession is understood through a human-centred lens that considers the consumer’s state of mind towards and relationship with an object. A state of possessiveness can be attained for material or immaterial objects and for objects that may or may not legally belong to the person. The discussion is presented within a design framework that discusses the motives and routes that lead to the state of possession. This framework is substantiated by looking at affordance principles and paths associated with possession. Each section includes a theoretical discussion as well as practical examples and insights that can be incorporated into the product design process itself. This chapter aids in understanding interactions relevant to the circular economy such as the maintenance and care that comes with object attachment and adoption of access-based consumption models. Understanding and designing for these desired interactions should be the first priority of designers followed by an establishment of laws, regulations and policies to support them.
  • ... Accordingly, people like to remember or re-enforce positive memories and forget negative ones. Mugge contends that if people experience positive memories in using a product, they emotionally attach to it regardless of its utility and appearance [69]. ...
    Article
    Full-text available
    In organizational and commercial settings, people often have clear roles and workflows against which functional and non-functional requirements can be extracted. However, in more social settings, such as platforms for enhancing social interaction, successful applications are driven more by user emotional engagement than functionality, the drivers of user engagement are difficult to identify. A key challenge is to understand people's emotional goals so that they can be incorporated into the design. This paper proposes a novel framework called the Emotional Attachment Framework that is based on existing models and theories of emotional attachment. Its aim is to facilitate the process of capturing emotional goals in software engineering. To demonstrate the framework in use, emotional goals are elicited for a software application that aims to provide help for homeless people. The outcomes are evaluated by domain experts and compared with an alternative approach. The results indicate that the Emotional Attachment Framework has the potential to help system analysts uncover additional emotional goals as well as provide valuable insights into these emotional goals.
  • ... The user can be described as possessing a set of characteristics that affect his or her relationship with the world, according to Juan Carlos Ortiz Nicolàs and Marcos Aurisicchio. These characteristics are: Senses (Fenko, Schifferstein & Hekkert, 2010;Dong et al., 2016); motor skills (Overbeeke, Djajadiningrat, Hummels & Wensveen, 2002); values (Nurkka, 2008); expectations (Wright, Wallace & McCarthy, 2008); needs (Hassenzahl, Diefenbach & Göritz, 2010); personality traits (Govers & Mugge, 2004); an individualized sense of fun (Carroll & Thomas, 1988); and attachment (Mugge, Schifferstein & Schoormans, 2010). User characteristics are more generally described by Gentner (2014) as "personal characteristics" that structure the understanding of the user: Culture; values and personality; mindset; and memory. ...
    Thesis
    L’expérience que les utilisateurs vivent est récemment devenu un facteur majeur de différenciation entre les entreprises de produits et de services (comme Toyota Motor Europe), menant à des recherches plus approfondies dans les domaines de l’expérience utilisateur et de l’interaction. Ces recherches prônent une plus grande considération de la perception subjective plutôt que les propriétés objectives des produits.Partant de cette approche de la ‘recherche en design’ à travers la perception subjective, cette étude tente de comprendre et de formaliser l’influence réciproque entre interaction et expérience utilisateur, définissant quels paramètres affectent les réactions subjectives. À partir de ces paramètres, cette recherche a isolée les propriétés physiques et digitales d’un produit dans le but de mettre en avant ces effets sur les réactions affectives et cognitives d’un utilisateur.Grâce à cette approche, cette recherche aboutit à des apports à la fois scientifique et industriel: cette recherche a rendu possible la formalisation de l’interdépendance entre l’expérience utilisateur et les interactions; la mise en place d’une taxonomie des produits interactifs à travers l’approche métaphorique des interaction physique et digitale; et la matérialisation d’une méthodologie et d’outils pour à la fois évaluer et créer des interactions à partir de l’approche expérientielle.
  • ... A.2 and A.3) featured the endorser and the brand (Par-Max), which was changed to 'The Leo Collection' and 'The Zuckerberg Collection' to reflect the fused and true progenic situations, respectively. Measurement scales have been adapted from past research, such as the source credibility scale (Ohanian, 1990), the attachment scale (Mugge et al., 2010), and purchase intention (McDaniel and Gates, 2001). Most of the scales are established scales generally employed in endorsement research, so the reliability of key constructs was examined using conventional methods. ...
  • ... The sense of affection, love and passion become more intense when the connection is stronger. Research has shown that people become attached to products that are special to them and thoughts, feelings and behaviors toward the object help to sustain the bond.' [9] NOTES: ...
  • ... nn, Schoormans, 2010;Naish, 2008). However when objects have a "singularised" and "storied life" (Epp & Price, 2010), Fig. 1 Author (2013). The Unforgotten hall cabinet [Front view, Photograph, Eva Fernandez courtesy of FORM] and are recommodified or rendered inalienable, their lifespan can be significantly extended (Belk 2006;Karanika & Hogg 2012;Mugge et. al., 2010). ...
    Article
    Full-text available
    The Unforgotten is a functional furniture piece that challenges current conventional industry design practices which seek to achieve object longevity and heirloom quality through realising the status of a 'design classic'. By taking a design anthropology approach to understand the person-object custodial relations, the creative work aims to embed a long-term attachment for the possessor by encouraging emotional attachment and custodian behaviour. As such, research was conducted in the areas of consumer psychology and behaviour, object attachment, inalienable objects and custodianship.
  • ... Consequently, there is a large body of knowledge that focuses on the user. For example, there are studies that have focused on how to: 1) stimulate the senses to enhance user experience (Fenko, Schifferstein and Hekkert, 2010;Schifferstein, 2004;Schifferstein and Desmet, 2007); 2) identify relevant expectations and needs in pleasant experiences (Hassenzahl, Diefenbach and Goritz, 2010); and 3) understand the mechanisms that influence how users develop bonds with products (Mugge, Schifferstein and Schoormans, 2010). Equally relevant is to develop an understanding of the role and impact of emotions on user experience. ...
    Thesis
    Full-text available
    This thesis reports an investigation to develop new understanding of pleasant experiences resulting from human-product interaction, which is then used to inform the development of a process and tools to support designers. The key argument of this research is that pleasant experiences can be designed. The thesis starts by providing a foundation of user experience. A new framework of user experience is proposed based on the analysis and synthesis of previous literature (Chapter 1). The interest then shifts from user experience to characterising pleasant experiences. Four empirical studies are presented focusing on aspects such as experiences with great products and the role of positive emotions in those experiences. The first study, investigating how users experience great products, identifies and characterises pragmatic and significant experiences (Chapter 2). Great products were studied as people understood and experienced them. In the second study, a set of twenty-five positive emotions are ranked by users and designers to understand what emotions they prefer to experience and elicit through their designs (Chapter 3). Highly-preferred emotions by users were: satisfaction, inspiration, confidence, joy, amusement and relaxed. Highly-preferred emotions by designers were: curiosity, joy, surprise, confidence, inspiration, fascination, satisfaction, and pride. In the third study, the twenty-five positive emotions are researched to understand their differences in pleasantness and arousal (Chapter 4). Three levels of arousal and pleasantness of emotions were identified and these are: exciting, neutral and calm emotions, and pleasant, quite pleasant, and very pleasant emotions. In the fourth study, anticipation, confidence, inspiration, and sympathy are investigated in depth to create rich profiles of the emotions (Chapter 5). The profiles focus on the triggers, appraisal structures, thought-action tendencies, and thematic appraisals of the emotions. Building on the understanding of pleasant experiences emerged from the research above, the thesis then presents evaluative research. In the fifth study, a design process and tools to support designers in the elicitation of pleasant experiences are proposed and tested. The process shows how emotional profiles can be used by designers as a means to create pleasant experiences through emotions (Chapter 6).
  • ... One of the most influential bodies of research regarding emotional longevity is Product Attachment, simply defined as the 'strength of the emotional bond a consumer experiences with a durable product' [3,10,[22][23][24][25][26][27]. Many researchers have conducted studies examining which factors positively affect the emotional connection between users and durable products with strategies that result in attachment shown in Table 2. ...
    Article
    Full-text available
    How can we develop products that consumers want to use for longer? The lifetime of electrical products is an ongoing concern in discussions about the circular economy. It is an issue that begins at an industry level, but that directly influences the way in which consumers use and discard products. Through a series of workshops and knowledge exchange sessions with Philips Lighting, this paper identifies which design factors influence a consumer’s tendency to retain their products for longer. These were distilled into a guiding framework for new product developers—The Emotional Durability Design Nine—consisting of nine themes: relationships, narratives, identity, imagination, conversations, consciousness, integrity, materiality, and evolvability. These nine themes are complemented by 38 strategies that help in the development of more emotionally engaging product experiences. We propose that the framework can be applied at multiple points during the new product development process to increase the likelihood that ‘emotion building’ features are integrated into an end product.
  • ... It implies that when people become attached to a particular product, they are more likely to handle the product with care, repair it when it is broken, and hesitate to throw it away [2] [3]. Research have investigated what kind of factors are important for the product attachment and found that there are many determinants modulating the degree of product attachment, such as memories, pleasantness, usability and reliability of the products [4] [5]. However, these previous studies only focused on the objects (e.g., watch or bag), not for the products with a virtual agent. ...
    Conference Paper
    Having an attachment is important to promote the utilization of electronic devices. To induce an emotional bond between people and voice interface, several companies have often named the voice interface. The present study examined whether a form of address (i.e., a way of calling a name of a voice agent or consumer) would modulate creating an attachment. Results showed that consumers reported a stronger attachment with voice agents that fit with the master-servant relationship based on the way of calling the name. Interestingly, this tendency was confirmed only for the behavioral index, but not for the subjective reports, suggesting that the form of address would implicitly affect the selection of behavior. Also, our findings indicate that increasing the emotional bond between consumers and voice agents could be modulated by the perception of the power balance during a human-agent interaction.
  • ... Regret is a negative emotional reaction to personal past acts. It is experienced when realizing that one would have been in a better situation if only one would have decided differently (Beike et all, 2009;Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010). According to Landman, regret is defined as "... a more or less painful judgment and state of feeling sorry for misfortunes, limitations, losses, shortcomings, transgressions, or mistakes (Bui et al., 2011). ...
    Article
    Full-text available
    Customers are the most effective factors in organizations success, especially in today's competitive world. Therefore, the organizations should consider them more than other factors. So, factors that affect them and also the mediators' effect on consumers purchase behavior should be investigated. So this research has investigated the effect of regret moderators on consumers' post-purchase behavior. This research is applied and descriptive type. Research population includes all customers of Babolsar Bozorgmehr shopping center in Iran during the summer 2016 and 384 of them have been selected through Cochran formula. A questionnaire has been used to gather data. Its reliability has been tested by a pre-test and its validity has been tested by face validation. To analyze the data factor analysis, regression test, SPSS, and LISREL software have been used. The results have indicated that; Perceived responsibility, Reversibility, Number of alternatives, Self-esteem, Social comparison, Optimism vs pessimism, Perfectionism, and Rumination have an impact on the post-purchase regret.
  • ... In contrast, few efforts have been made to explore how brand attachment is created, maintained, and enhanced. The few studies focusing on this area have reported on user-derived benefits involving price, quality, durability, and packaging as potential drivers of brand attachment (Grisaffe and Nguyen, 2011;Mugge et al., 2010;Japutra et al., 2014;Levy and Hino, 2016;Malär et al., 2011;Louis and Lombart, 2010). However, the influence of product design dimensions (e.g., aesthetic, functional, and symbolic) on brand attachment has surprisingly been disregarded in the literature. ...
  • ... This is particularly true given the features of smartphones today. As pleasure is one determinant of satisfaction, marketers should stimulate emotional bonding and elicit pleasure of the customer to their brands (Mugge, et al., 2010). ...
    Thesis
    Full-text available
    This dissertation is about consumer choice criteria of smartphones in Singapore. Through a small survey of the Singapore population, data such as brand preference, brand loyalty, country of origin/manufacture as well as the various attractions such as accessories or price package of mobile phones are collected and analysed. Aspects like positioning, showrooming and word of mouth advertising are also discussed.
  • ... The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results. 12 (from 1 to 10): ...
    Article
    Full-text available
    This study proposes a novel quality function deployment (QFD) design methodology based on customers’ emotions conveyed by facial expressions. The current advances in pattern recognition related to face recognition techniques have fostered the cross-fertilization and pollination between this context and other fields, such as product design and human-computer interaction. In particular, the current technologies for monitoring human emotions have supported the birth of advanced emotional design techniques, whose main focus is to convey users’ emotional feedback into the design of novel products. As quality functional deployment aims at transforming the voice of customers into engineering features of a product, it appears to be an appropriate and promising nest in which to embed users’ emotional feedback with new emotional design methodologies, such as facial expression recognition. This way, the present methodology consists in interviewing the user and acquiring his/her face with a depth camera (allowing three-dimensional (3D) data), clustering the face information into different emotions with a support vector machine classificator, and assigning customers’ needs weights relying on the detected facial expressions. The proposed method has been applied to a case study in the context of agriculture and validated by a consortium. The approach appears sound and capable of collecting the unconscious feedback of the interviewee.
  • ... This was congruent with past studies that supported the notion that tourism places can be differentiated in terms of their hedonic, utilitarian, social and consumption meanings (Burgner et al., 2014;Cheng & Lu, 2013;Grappi & Montanari, 2011). Strong attachments are associated with strong feelings of connection, affection, love and passion (Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010;Suntikul & Jachna, 2016). This is one of the indicators that visitors can become attached to such places which meet their desired experiences (Scannell & Gifford, 2010). ...
    Conference Paper
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between place attachment and revisit intention. Revisit intention is considered to be important topic both in academia and tourism industry. To understand the formation of revisit intention from the destination perspective this study explored the role of place attachment and its related conceptual issues. This paper begins with a discussion on theoretical background and highlights some important unresolved issues before bridging to magnify the importance of psychological process in explaining the relationship between place attachment and revisit intention. It integrates various past research background in understanding place attachment and revisit intention to spectacle the absence of comprehensive and coherent approach to capture tourist emotion arising from experience and manifested in place attachment. This paper highlights the conceptual inadequacy of the current research to intensify the process between people and place in order to justify the attachment properties and further proposed a set of direction for future research should be heading in order to position place attachment to better predict revisit intention. This paper also discussed theoretical contribution, limitation and practical implication for tourism operators and policy makers.
  • ... Researchers have underscored the importance of attachment in understanding clothing disposal behaviour (Ha-Brookshire & Hodges, 2009;Roster, 2001), because disposal encompasses emotional and physical severance of the product (McCracken, 1986;Roster, 2001). For a clothing article that consumers developed attachment to, they tend to keep or recycle it even if it is rarely worn or not functional (Bye & McKinney, 2007;Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010;Roster, 2001). For instance, Bye and McKinney (2007) found that women retain clothes when those items serve as a tangible reminder of their past selves and memories. ...
    Article
    Boredom reflects the dynamic nature of consumer tastes and preferences. Understanding the role of boredom in clothing disposal is of particular importance given that consumers often dispose of clothes they feel bored with, leading to harmful environmental consequences. Despite its substantial influence on post‐acquisition behaviors, boredom has received insufficient attention in the disposal literature. In this paper, we explore the factors that lead to boredom and the effect of boredom on retention, recycling, and discarding of clothing. We use a sequential mixed methods approach, consisting of a first qualitative phase that employs in‐depth interviews to generate hypotheses, followed by a second quantitative phase that tests the hypotheses using survey data. In two phases, we identify the oldness of clothing, decreased social fit, and purchase of new clothing as drivers of boredom, which implies that the physical and aesthetic attributes of the clothing, social meaning ascribed to the clothing, and situational factors collectively influence feelings of boredom toward owned clothing. As boredom intensifies, consumers are less inclined to keep the item and more inclined to recycle or discard it. Furthermore, we find that attachment and resource input (i.e., money, time, and effort) moderate the effect of boredom on decisions regarding disposal methods. The results add to our understanding of emotion‐laden disposal by revealing the role of boredom in clothing disposal. Finally, our findings call for the collective efforts of consumers, retailers, campaigners, and policymakers to break away from an increasingly extravagant and wasteful culture of clothing consumption.
  • ... For instance, an individual can experience a process of charging an activity with emotional energy (Belk 1988). In fact, Mugge et al. (2010) demonstrated that product attachment is also determined by utility. ...
    Article
    Full-text available
    Despite the importance of the baby boomer generation, there is relatively scarce research focused on that consumer group. Based on the framework of product experience, this study explores the experiences of older baby boomers associated with consumer-clothing attachment. The interpretive approach utilized in-depth interviews with 18 older baby boomers born between 1946 and 1955 to enquire about their experiences with attached clothing. Participants were asked to bring to the interview photographs of the clothing they had become more attached to. Findings indicate that the experiences of older baby boomers with attached clothing are mainly created, developed, and maintained via all three dimensions of product experience; aesthetic properties of the product, positive emotions triggered by the product, and the symbolic and instrumental meanings associated with the product. However, the aesthetic properties and positive emotions related to those products were bound to its assigned meanings. Meaning varied and was classified as associations with: identity or the belief that the object is a self-extension; memories or the connection with the past; social standing or sense of status; and strong associations with utility. For all participants, the stronger the experience of meaning with a specific product, the stronger the level of attachment towards that product. This qualitative investigation extends the understanding of the framework of product experience and the concept of consumer-clothing attachment. Contributions offer opportunities to marketers and designers who seek to better understand the experiences behind baby boomers’ clothing attachment.
  • ... Vehicle inspection tests had a significant influence on crashworthiness of a bus. This concurs with Dant, [48] &Sheller [49] that a purchase, customers enter a long-term relationship with their chosen product, the product manufacturer, and the dealer providing the after-purchase customer service. ...
  • ... In contrast, few efforts have been made to explore how brand attachment is created, maintained, and enhanced. The few studies focusing on this area have reported on user-derived benefits involving price, quality, durability, and packaging as potential drivers of brand attachment (Grisaffe and Nguyen, 2011;Mugge et al., 2010;Japutra et al., 2014;Levy and Hino, 2016;Malär et al., 2011;Louis and Lombart, 2010). However, the influence of product design dimensions (e.g., aesthetic, functional, and symbolic) on brand attachment has surprisingly been disregarded in the literature. ...
  • ... This was congruent with past studies that supported the notion that tourism places can be differentiated in terms of their hedonic, utilitarian, social and consumption meanings (Burgner et al., 2014;Cheng & Lu, 2013;Grappi & Montanari, 2011). Strong attachments are associated with strong feelings of connection, affection, love and passion (Mugge, Schifferstein, & Schoormans, 2010;Suntikul & Jachna, 2016). This is one of the indicators that visitors can become attached to such places which meet their desired experiences (Scannell & Gifford, 2010). ...
    Conference Paper
    Full-text available
    The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of place attachment and its related conceptual issues. This study attempt to integrate place attachment theory and cognitive appraisal spectacle the absence of coherent approach attested in tourist experience. This study further highlights future direction to better predict revisit intention.
  • Chapter
    Die Produktlebenszeiten vieler Produktkategorien, von der Haushaltsgeräteindustrie bis hin zur Elektronik und Bekleidung, haben sich im Laufe der Zeit verringert. Neue zirkuläre Geschäftsmodelle müssen Strategien zur Verlangsamung, Schließung und Verengung von Ressourcenkreisläufen beinhalten und gleichzeitig ein besseres Leistungsversprechen als das lineare Modell bieten: attraktiver, bequemer, höherer Servicegrad.
  • The objective of this paper is to formalize and enrich the relation between user experience and interaction. Both a State of the Art and an Empirical Study are presented along this paper. It results in a theoretical model of design information that formalizes and highlights key principles of the interdependency between user experience and interaction in early design. The research is situated within a long-term work on Kansei design and later on Experience Design in the Kansei Design Division of Toyota Motor Europe. The method we used to conduct the empirical study consists in evaluating the cognitive and affective impacts of two user experiences and four interactive prototypes on 30 participants. In so doing, we highlighted key principles of interdependency presented as notions of consistency; temporality; intertwining; complementarity and immersibility. Such research aims to develop and strengthen an in-depth understanding of interaction from a user experience point of view, in order to make available different tools and methodologies for interaction’s creation and evaluation. This research can be of value for both researchers in cognitive psychology, user experience, interaction design, kansei design or design of emotions, and for designers, engineers or ergonomist from the industrial world.
  • Article
    This research explored teenagers’ use of handcraft apparel in the United States and South Korea. Teenagers were selected for a cross national comparison of youth and their emotional attachment to handcraft apparel in terms of: use of handcraft items compared with purchased products; the relationship between the craft user and creator; and the influence of emotional attachment to handcrafts on the friendship and self-esteem of youths. Responses of US and Korean high school and middle school students acknowledged the value of handcrafts. Handcraft items offer a measure of sustainability not offered by clothing destined for the fast-fashion cycle. Items handcrafted by friends and family have considerable value as objects of everyone design as well as emotional value. In this study, we also conclude that the value of handcraft apparel and crafts in everyday creativity may have a positive influence on peer relationships and self-esteem among youth in the two countries. Comparing the two youth groups in this study, we found that US teenagers have a greater tendency to use handcrafted items compared with their Korean counterparts that may be attributed to the wider popularity of handcrafting in US society. US participants reported a significantly longer period of actual use of handcraft items. Although handcraft items are increasingly overlooked in favor of mass-produced fashion products, handcraft apparel can be expected to endure as an alternative product with recognized sustainability, given the perceived importance of handmade craft and apparel made by loved ones.
  • Article
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the apparel disposal process and explore, specifically, male disposal through consignment vs donation disposal modes. This study hopes to uncover not only the process but the influences that motivate these behaviors. Design/methodology/approach Observations at two sites included conversational interviews with employees as well as consumers disposing apparel through these sites. Collection took place over two months with 26 interviews taking place. Findings Themes of seasonal change and financial incentive suggest the use of consignment as a separate process for consumers from donation. Consignment suggested value, while donation was viewed as a habit. Research limitations/implications Previous research as well as the findings of this study suggest that apparel donation is similar across genders. They also suggest that consignment is viewed by male consumers as a separate action from donation. Originality/value Little to no research has been conducted to understand male apparel disposal, studies on disposal has focused primarily on college-aged females (i.e. Morgan and Birtwistle, 2009). This study adds to a limited body of work to understand the differences and very possible similarities across genders in this behavior.
  • This research aims to formalize the fundamental relationship between user experience, interaction, and metaphors. By doing so, we provide a tool and a methodology to enable the classification of interactive products and consequently propose some guidelines for designing interactive products. In complement, we make explicit the notion of metaphors in interaction design through three dimensions: the environment, the product (target), and the perceived reference (source). We finally define a theoretical model of user experience and interaction (experiential interaction) containing human affective and cognitive processes. This research establishes a taxonomy of interactive products based on a survey in which 176 participants evaluated 50 interactive products. This research can be of interest for researchers in interactive products from disciplines of user experience design, human factors, computer science, artificial intelligence, and design science.
  • Article
    Using ethnographic, experimental, and survey data from a handicraft cluster in southern India, this paper reports on a study of when and why people who identify with their work might sacrifice financial rewards in their economic decisions. Based on findings from ethnographic fieldwork, I hypothesize that the monetary value that individuals who identify with their work seek for their output depends on their audience: when they encounter discerning audiences, who are knowledgeable about and appreciative of their work, they underemphasize financial gains; transactions with non-discerning audiences, however, result in a focus on monetary rewards. I propose that the mechanism underlying this behavior is product attachment: people who identify with their work develop affection for the output of their labor and prefer to transact with audiences who will take care of their products beyond the point of sale, even if doing so results in lower monetary rewards. I substantiate this theory with a field experiment by demonstrating that handicraft artisans in India who identify with their work sell their products at different prices to discerning and non-discerning groups of buyers. This paper contributes to our understanding of economic decision making in the context of meaningful work by highlighting the moderating role of audiences and uncovering the mechanism of product attachment.
  • Article
    Full-text available
    The number of hotels in China presently exceeds 42 million, leading to high levels of commercial competition. Attracting patrons in the context of fierce competition and establishing a good relationship as well as an emotional connection with them have become top priorities for hotel managers. Brand attachment forms the basis for forging a strong customer-brand relationship, holding strategic significance for hotel enterprises and brands in terms of acquiring sustainable competitive advantage. Currently, neither the mechanisms underlying brand attachment nor the factors influencing it are clearly understood. Value is a key concept for understanding and predicting consumer behavior. Sentimental value is a subjective and high-level need; it is the utility of experiencing an emotional state in the process of consumption. Different types of hotel customers have different consumption expectations. Economy- hotel customers mainly pursue functional value. Luxury- hotel customer pay more attention to the symbolic and hedonic resources of the hotel. In view of these differences, this study first tests the relationship between perceived functional value, hedonic value, symbolic value, and brand attachment, and then tests the mediating role of sentimental value and the moderating role of hotel type. Data were obtained from a survey of 545 hotel customers and the hypothesis was tested using the structural equation model. The results show that the three antecedent variables (functional value, symbolic value, and hedonic value) were positively related to hotel customers’ brand attachment. Second, sentimental value was positively related to hotel customers’brand attachment. Third, sentimental value partly mediated the relationships between functional value, symbolic value, hedonic value, and hotel customers’brand attachment. Fourth, hotel type moderated the mediating relationship between the symbolic value and brand attachment. Based on these results, this study makes two unique contributions to the extant literature. First, the study expands our understanding of what determines brand attachment by showing that sentimental value mediates the relationships between functional value, symbolic value, hedonic value, and brand attachment. Second, it shows that there are different ways to foster brand attachment among customers of economy hotels and luxury hotels. To satisfy the perceived functional value of economy- hotel customers, the formation of brand attachment can be promoted. However, for luxury-hotel customers, their perceived symbolic value should be satisfied in order to form brand attachment. In addition to these theoretical contributions, this study has important practical implications for hotel marketers and customers. It provides a new insight on the relationship between customers and brands, from the perspective of value. Brand attachment is a new perspective in a hotel brand’s relationship marketing. In developing a hotel brand strategy, managers should focus on the relationship between the brand and its customers. A good hotel brand not only provides consumers with functional and reliable products or services but can also establish an emotional connection with customers.
  • Chapter
    With social network service, people have become share their emotions with others broader, and the demands of the private channel have decreased. Since the private channel has a limitation that there is no opponent of social communication, people could not share their emotions effectively. In order to supplement this part of the social conversation, we apply the communication interface to the diary of the personal channel. This study suggests color feedback as a communication interface and investigates the effects of color feedback in a diary environment, specifically how color feedback on emotional words affect users’ perceptions on social presence, attachment, enjoyment, and satisfaction. To address this issue, we performed a between-subjects experiment (N = 15) with three levels of diary interfaces for color feedback: (1) emotion-based color feedback, (2) random color feedback, and (3) without color feedback (control condition). Results show that existing color feedback (i.e., emotion-based and random color feedback) was more effective than without color feedback on social presence and enjoyment; however, results of emotion-based color feedback and random color feedback had not any difference. These findings demonstrate the effects of color feedback and suggest several implications of the experiment which helps in future research.
  • Chapter
    Full-text available
    There is no easy way out or single solution from the current rather linear economic system. The sustainability impacts of resource production and use are highly interlinked. Even renewables that deliver zero carbon energy depend on the use of critical materials and takes up precious space and land , while land use change, climate change and changing weather patterns, as well as biodiversity loss are already affecting food production. The Circular Economy, representing an alternative sustainable development pathway, is often seen as a panacea for sustainability issues. However, with high expectations and much at stake, there needs to be a strong and widespread understanding of how to operationalise the concept. Solutions cannot solely rely on technical advances or top-down policy implementation, but also require individual responsibility and changes in consumption patterns coupled with appropriate policies and business responses.
  • Article
    PT. Kereta Api Pariwisata is one of subsidiaries of PT. Kereta Api Indonesia (Persero), which manages business travel services and tour-based railroad. PT. Kereta Api Pariwisata has thre tourism trains such Bali tourism train, Toraja tourism train, and Nusantara tourism train. The third tourism train offers comfort and beauty of the theme of culture of Bali, Toraja, and Nusantara that can provide a service experience to passengers is expected to create a tourism train passenger satisfaction PT. Kereta Api Pariwisata. The theory of service experience that is used by Knutson et al., In Identifying the Dimensions of the Experience Construct. Journal of Hospitality & Leisure Marketing (2006:39) with dimensions used are incentive, accessibility, convenience, utility, environment, benefits, and trust. Theory of satisfaction is a composite theory of Kotler (2009:164) with dimensions of performance and importance to the theory Hatane Semuel (2009:30) which states "Important Necessary-performance analysis, namely by conducting a survey of the passengers to know the expectations of passengers against the interests of each attribute and the level of satisfaction derived from the actual service." So the dimensions of satisfaction used was the performance, importance , and expectations. The premise which supporting this study is from Debra Grace, Aron O'cass (2004), Hoi Mun (2006), and Nigel Hill, Rachel Allen (2007). Based on the above explanation, the research about on service experience analysis in creating a tourism train passenger satisfaction PT. Kereta Api Pariwisata. This research is using descriptive and verificatife with is an explanatory method survey sampling technique with accidental sampling (convenience sampling) technique, and the number of samples of 115 respondents. Analysis technique data in using Path Analysis with the help of software SPSS 15.0 computer interview, and quesioner as data collection techniques. The Findings showed that, the analysis of service experience through the incentive dimension, accessibility, convenience, utility, environment, benefits, and trust have influence over the passenger’s satisfaction. Former of need dimention wich have the highest influence isbenefit and accessibility dimension have a little significant impact on passenger’s satisfaction. As for the highest passenger tourism train satisfaction perceived to the dimensions of benefit. That means that passengers need the advantage of everything they done and easy access make the passengers feel the comfort of the tourism train. Limitations in this research that this study just conducted a survey to domestic passengers of tourism trains. Therefore, further research is expected to examine the foreign tourism train passenger satisfaction.
  • Article
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