Article

Field testing two simulation games: Do winners win consistently?

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Abstract

Purpose – The study emanated from initial attempts to determine whether two computer simulations used in teaching a college business course delivered a meaningful learning experience. This paper aims to investigate whether students' level of performance in the simulation game was due to the application of skill or largely a matter of “luck”. Design/methodology/approach – Applying a method similar to that of Wellington et al., the study evaluated the consistency of performance across two different rounds of each simulation game. It also compared performance levels across both simulations, and examined the relationship between game performance and academic achievement. Findings – The significant consistency between performance levels suggests that with respect to the simulations used in this study, the game score reflected the player's application of skill rather than reliance on “luck”. However, there is no significant relationship between game performance and academic achievement. Originality/value – While this study is based on two specific games, other simulation users can use it as a yardstick to ascertain the educational value of the simulations that they use.

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... Most of the games used for entrepreneurship cover business-related knowledge and skills and their use in education dates from a long time (e.g., [25] [28] [39] [12]). [29] highlights some advantages of business simulations and that skills employed there are not the same as those being assessed in conventional academic evaluation. [35] reports of a project about evaluation of business simulation software for mechanical engineering students, analyzing various open source and Components-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) tools. ...
... [35] reports of a project about evaluation of business simulation software for mechanical engineering students, analyzing various open source and Components-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) tools. A certain number of high-level business games and simulations, with different features and targets, are being used in business schools (e.g., [5] [35] [29] [34] [50]). Here is a list of games that we have considered in our preliminary analysis for the selection: Marketplace Venture Strategy, SimVenture, Virtual Trader, Intopia, Beer Game, Zapitalism, Virtual U, Industry Giant II, Innov8, EagleRacing, The Enterprise Game, The Finance Game, MetaVals. ...
... Most of the games used for entrepreneurship cover business-related knowledge and skills and their use in education dates from a long time (e.g., [25] [28] [39] [12]). [29] highlights some advantages of business simulations and that skills employed there are not the same as those being assessed in conventional academic evaluation. [35] reports of a project about evaluation of business simulation software for mechanical engineering students, analyzing various open source and Components-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) tools. ...
... [35] reports of a project about evaluation of business simulation software for mechanical engineering students, analyzing various open source and Components-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) tools. A certain number of high-level business games and simulations, with different features and targets, are being used in business schools (e.g., [5] [35] [29] [34] [50]). Here is a list of games that we have considered in our preliminary analysis for the selection: Marketplace Venture Strategy, SimVenture, Virtual Trader, Intopia, Beer Game, Zapitalism, Virtual U, Industry Giant II, Innov8, EagleRacing, The Enterprise Game, The Finance Game, MetaVals. ...
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The potential of Serious Games (SGs) in education is widely recognized, and their adoption is significant in particular in children instruction. However, the deployment rate of SGs in higher education (HE) and their proper insertion in meaningful curricula is still quite low. This paper intends to make a first step in the direction of a better characterization of the pedagogical effectiveness of SGs in HE, by providing a qualitative analysis based on our field experience using three games for entrepreneurship, that we have studied in the light of two well established pedagogical paradigms, such as the Revised Bloom’s taxonomy and the Kolb’s Learning stages. In general, we observe that SGs address several goals of the Bloom’s taxonomy, in particular at the lower levels. Moreover, the cyclical nature of the business simulations can be directly mapped to the sequential steps described by Kolb. However, our analysis also shows that SGs have still to significantly evolve in order to become an effective and efficient tool that could be successfully and reliably used in HE. In the light of our experience, we also propose a schema for a proper integration of SGs by supporting different goals in different steps of a formal education process, Our study finally suggests directions for future research in the field.
... [27] reports of a project about evaluation of business simulation software for mechanical engineering students, analyzing various open source and COTS tools. There is a certain number of high-level business games and simulations that are being used with different features and targets, in business schools, also in Europe (e.g., [27] [28] [29] [30] [31]). Here is a list of games that we have considered in our analysis (described in section IV): Marketplace Venture Strategy, SimVenture, Virtual Trader, Intopia, Beer Game, Zapitalism, Virtual U, Industry Giant II, Virtual U, Innov8, EagleRacing, The Enterprise Game, The Finance Game, MetaVals. ...
... INSEAD, and the interesting experiment carried out in [24]). [25] reports his experience at the US Department of Defense, where 3 different Components-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) management simulation videogames were added to 3 courses. The study reports that "Students in classes using the game scored significantly higher means than classes that did not". [26] reports that user performance in simulations is largely the result of players' skills rather than luck; that learning through "trialand-error" led to better simulation performance; and that skills employed in simulation are not the same as those being assessed in conventional academic evaluation. [27] reports of a project about evaluati ...
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Enhancing the offer for entrepreneurship education is an important challenge for the nowadays knowledge societies. The eSG project is addressing this issue by analysing the added value that could be contributed by employing serious games (SGs) as a tool for allowing students in particular technology students - to become familiar, mainly through practice, with basic concepts of entrepreneurship and company management. This paper presents the main requirements for the course and SGs obtained by surveying literature, entrepreneurs, students and teachers. We represented the requirements in a table template keeping into account usability, pedagogy, the entrepreneurship skills expressed by state of the art models and three major axes for entrepreneurship education at universities. These table descriptors were then used to assess validity of SGs and choose an appropriate mix for the courses. We have also defined a set of metrics to evaluate the advancement of students during the course. Based on these tools and knowledge, the next steps of the project will involve extensive user testing in the actual courses that are being performed in Genoa, Delft and Barcelona.
... Its focus is on product development. The software includes four main macro-groups, one of them is operations which contains production [54,55,46,45,56]. With the Enterprise Game participants can learn how to manage an enterprise, including the production function. ...
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Various studies confirm the positive outcomes of business simulation games, which can be effectively used in the education of manufacturing and supply chain processes. The use of them in education increases business knowledge, causes better understanding of business processes, improves decision making, problem-solving, and interpersonal communication skills. General business simulation games with manufacturing functions included are described briefly. Twenty-two specialized manufacturing and supply chain simulations are discussed in detail showing their features and decision-making possibilities. The study is useful for educators, trainers, and companies looking for practical learning methods. The discussion of the games gives them an opportunity to better understand available business simulations and be able to choose the appropriate one for their expected learning outcomes.
... Manzoni and Angehrn improved decision-making capabilities (Pasin & Giroux, 2011), and overall increased academic performance (Gamlath, 2009;Wolfe & Luethge, 2003). Given the significance of simulations in management teaching, it is concerning that there is a comparative scarcity of empirically tested simulations available to management educators outside of the fields of strategy and operations management. ...
Article
Management educators employ a variety of learning and teaching tools in order to engage students, with online business simulations being one of these tools. While many business simulations are available to management educators, they do not always fit the needs of the educator or have evidence to support their efficacy for achieving student outcomes such as engagement. In this article, we illustrate how a human resource management (HRM) simulation was designed, developed, and tested using design science principles to show how student engagement can be achieved with such digital tools. The findings of the testing process show that the type of Learning Management System used is less important than the novelty and perceived authenticity of the tasks. This article offers practical suggestions to create and test similar online-simulated environments using the design science process, as well as guidelines for those who wish to use the HRM simulation that was developed by the authors for this project.
... Although not widely utilized, certain number of high-level business games and simulations were used around universities and educational institutions in Europe. Gamlath (2009), with a game called SimVenture™, evaluated game performance to determine if performance was mainly due to skill or largely a matter of luck. In Greece, MAGEUR business game was played by students within an entrepreneurship training project which comprised seminars and case studies alongside the game (Mantakas, 2010). ...
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... virtual reality and artificial intelligence) and an increasing use of such tools within US universities. However, the European situation is less investigated and appears more fragmented, although interesting examples are available [Anghern et al., 2009;Mantakas, 2010;King and Newman, 2009;Gamlath, 2009;Hunecker, 2009;Riedel and Pawar, 2009]. ...
Article
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... The study states that "students in classes using the game scored significantly higher means than classes that did not". Gamlath [29] reports that user performance in simulations is largely the result of the players' skills rather than luck, that that learning through "trial-and-error" led to better simulation performance, and that skills employed in the simulation are not the same as those being assessed in conventional academic evaluation. King and Newman [30] report of a project that evaluates the business simulation software for mechanical engineering students through analyzing various open source and COTS tools. ...
... The study stresses that "Students in classes using the game scored significantly higher means than classes that did not". [17] states that user performance in simulations is largely the result of players' skills rather than luck; that learning through "trialand-error" led to better simulation performance; and that skills employed in simulation are not the same as those being assessed in conventional academic evaluation. [18] describes a project about evaluation of business simulation software for mechanical engineering students, analyzing various open source and COTS tools. ...
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... The study states that "students in classes using the game scored significantly higher means than classes that did not". Gamlath [29] reports that user performance in simulations is largely the result of the players' skills rather than luck, that that learning through "trial-and-error" led to better simulation performance, and that skills employed in the simulation are not the same as those being assessed in conventional academic evaluation. King and Newman [30] report of a project that evaluates the business simulation software for mechanical engineering students through analyzing various open source and COTS tools. ...
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The deployment rate of serious games (SGs) in higher education (HE) and their proper insertion in meaningful curricula isstill quite low. There is a lack of papers in literature describing deployment of SGs for HE in detail, critically showing educational benefits, and providing guidelines and best practices on their use. With the present work, we intend to make a first step in this direction, by reporting our experience in using state of the art managerial SGs in MSc Engineer- ing/business courses in four different European universities. In order to describe and analyse the educational characteristics and effectiveness of each game, we propose to use two models that we have straightforwardly extracted from two major pedagogical paradigms: the Bloom’s revised cognitive learning goals taxon- omy and the Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. Based on our experience in devel- oping the SG-based courses, we also propose a set of lessons and practices that we believe could be of interest to incentivize and better support deployment of SGs in HE courses.
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