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The successful organisation: Keeping the talent that drives your results

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Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand the elements of a success culture that serves both people and the business. Design/methodology/approach – The paper explores the style of cultural, management and personal development that supports successful people. The research is based on in-depth interviews with serial achievers plus long-term experience of working in successful and failing cultures. Findings – The research finds the five fundamentals for success, plus the seven behaviours that drive people to achieve their desired outputs. Embedding these behaviours into a business culture supports exceptional achievement. Also, developing an understanding of what drives success will ensure that companies provide appropriate individual support to their high achievers. Research limitations/implications – Future research could look at the specific impact of building an inspirational manager community in a business workplace on levels of company and personal success. Practical implications – For companies to build a consistently successful business, they need to make the best of their high achievers. This requires a strong and constructive management community, made up of people who enjoy the challenge of developing talent and have adequate levels of emotional intelligence. It also demands leaders who role-model the importance of the success behaviours and reward creative failure as well as obvious success. Originality/value – The new findings relate to the five fundamentals and seven success behaviours as outlined in The Psychology of Success. This information provides a new approach to success and is highly relevant to twenty-first century business.

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... The quality, excellence and high-performance literature generally emphasizes "good" employees (e.g. Van Dyne et al., 1994;Winsted, 2000;Leary-Joyce, 2010;Mechinda and Patterson, 2011), whereas "bad" (non-performing) employees and how to effectively deal with them has received little attention (McKenna, 2002;Houseman and Minor, 2015;Call et al., 2015). This omission is noteworthy as research on high-performance organizations (HPOs) shows that dealing decisively with non-performers is critical to achieving high performance (de Waal, 2012). ...
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