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A Technique for Choosing Cost-Effective Instructional Delivery Systems

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Abstract

This report presents a technique for choosing cost-effective instructional delivery systems for proposed training programs. It is the Training Effectiveness, Cost Effectiveness Prediction (TECEP) technique. It provides an orderly approach for the skilled training system designer to use in making delivery system choices during the conceptual design phase. A three-step procedure is described in which training objectives are classified and organized into groups, appropriate learning strategies are defined for each group, media capable of supporting these strategies are identified, and the costs of alternative forms of training are projected. With this information, optimum delivery system choices can be made. Reference materials are provided to aid the training system designer in carrying out this process. Included are a list of 12 types of learning algorithms and the class of learning objectives each supports, separate tables for choosing instructional delivery systems for each algorithm, and a cost model for comparing the value of resources required by alternative delivery systems. A Fortran IV program listing of the cost model is included.

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... Two studies concerned with the cost of training systems have been particularly useful in this work. The Naval Training Analysis and Evaluation Group (TAEG) developed a cost model (Braby, Henry, Parrish, & Swope, 1978) which included methods for evaluating the elements in each cost category sho,n above. A computer program for calculating total training cost was also provided. ...
... Values are assigned to each and are averaged for an overall Similarity score. In order to derive the training techniques score, a user first categorizes each subtask according to Braby's, et al. (1975) task taxonomy. The task category then refers the user to a special set of learning principles for that category (after Willis and Peterson, 1961;and Micheli, 1972). ...
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... Gagn6 (1972) argued that tasks may be classified with respect to a limited number of skill categories, and that each category had its own learning requirements. Braby, Henry, Parrish, and Swope (1975) took this reasoning one step further and developed unique training strategies for each of the skill types. Boldovici et al. (1977) reasoned that if tasks similar in underlying skills were trained together, economies in training could be realized. ...
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