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Winning the Peace - Army Leadership Training

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Abstract

Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the protracted conflict in Southwest Asia, today serves at the center stage of the fight against a global insurgency. OIF merely reaffirms other historical examples of key leadership capabilities required of U.S. land forces, and the United States Army in particular, for these types of prolonged conflicts. In addition, OIF reflects the changed nature of the world, providing insight to new and modified capabilities required of leaders. Some of these leadership capabilities the Army brought to the fight, others were learned along the way, and still others require development and distribution throughout the force. These capabilities exist both separately and simultaneously at the tactical to the operational levels. This paper describes the leadership capabilities required within the Army to win the peace in the 21st Century operational and tactical environment. In doing so, this paper will identify the state of those capabilities in the current force, and how to train and equip leaders with critical capabilities now and in the future.

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