Article

A desensitization protocol for the mAb cetuximab

Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology (Impact Factor: 11.48). 12/2008; 123(1):260-2. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2008.09.046
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Available from: Teresa K Tarrant, Sep 22, 2014
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