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The Vancouver Academy of Management Jass Symposium : Jazz As a Metaphor for Organizing In the 21st Century

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... However the unclosed gaps in such literature can visibly be observed (Magni et al., 2009). Firstly, researches on the domain of improvisation rely heavily on the studies about jazz, theatre, sports, or even public speaking as a metaphor (for example, Hatch, 1997;Hatch, 1998;Kamoche and Cunha, 2003;Sawyer, 1992). This perspective has the tendency to drive improvisation into a shadow as just a metaphor. ...
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Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the structural relationships among explorative learning strategy, improvisational creativity, compositional creativity, and innovation in Information and Communication Technology-Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (ICT-SMEs). Design/methodology/approach 213 valid questionnaires from SMEs’ top management positions were evaluated to investigate the proposed model of the research empirically. As a methodological approach, partial least square (PLS) path modeling approach, a variance-based structural equation modeling (VB-SEM) was employed. Findings The statistical results imply that explorative learning has a positive impact on improvisational creativity and innovation while improvisational creativity has a positive influence on compositional creativity and innovation as well. Compositional creativity and innovation are also positively associated. Surprisingly, improvisational creativity mediates the relationship between explorative learning and innovation. Furthermore, PLS-Multi Group Analysis (PLS-MGA) reveals that heterogeneity exists in the collected data and number of employees is a moderating variable. The results of the research indicate that companies with number of employees between 51 and 100 are more creative and innovative in comparison with other groups. On the other hand, the positive relationship between explorative learning and compositional creativity was not supported in this research. Originality/value This study is one of the few researches in the realm of examining the structural relationship among explorative learning strategy, improvisational creativity, compositional creativity, and innovation in ICT-SMEs, regarding the number of employees as a moderating variable.
... 549). The most popular point of comparison in organisational improvisation studies is jazz music (Hatch, 1998;Holbrook, 2003;Pina E Cunha, Clegg, Rego, & Neves, 2014;Weick, 1998;Zarankin & Wang, 2013) but there has been almost no recognition that rhetoric, a discipline so close to management (and, obviously, marketing) in its motivations and perspectives, has such a strong tradition of improvisation. The study of what has been called real-time marketing (McKenna, 1995(McKenna, , 1997Oliver, Rust, & Varki, 1998), for example, is ripe for a reconceptualisation around rhetorical kairos. ...
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The growing relevance of improvisation for successful organizing calls for a better understanding of how individuals develop improvisation skills. While research has investigated the role of training and simulations, little is known about how individuals develop improvisation skills when formal training is not an option, and how individual-level factors shape development trajectories. We explore these issues in a longitudinal qualitative analysis of live-action role-playing. Our findings surface a three-stage process of improvisation development shaped by the presence of task and social structures, which act as both constraints and resources. Moreover, our findings illuminate how collaborative and competitive orientations shape whether improvisers perceive these structures as a resource that they need to nurture and renew (i.e., collaborative), or to seize and exploit (i.e., competitive). We also show that individual orientations are not always enduring but can change over time, engendering four types of improvisation development trajectories. Our work provides a longitudinal account of how individual orientations shape the process of improvisation development. In so doing, we also explain why individuals who are skilled improvisers do not necessarily improvise effectively as a collective, and we reconcile different conceptualizations of improvisation.
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This paper builds on the analysis of factors observed at jazz jam sessions facilitating team creativity and improvisation as a model for managing organizational innovation. The model was established through detailed observations, surveys, historical research, and interviews. Even though the jazz metaphor has been used as a model for organizational improvisation the discussions rarely extend beyond the improvisational process of idea generation (Frishammar et al. in Creativity Innov Manag 2:179, 2016) towards a comprehensive model for team creativity and effective organizational management (Santos et al. in Creativity Innov Manag 24(4):645–658, 2015). The seven factor Jam Session Model for Group Creativity and Innovative Technology is built from a comprehensive analysis of the jam session process and exemplified with case studies of leading innovative companies such offering a theoretical and practical model for managing and facilitating group creativity and innovative technology.
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A few attempts were made to investigate how sense making is triggered through Web 2.0 utilisation and how it enables the accomplishment of key organisational outcomes. The objective of this research is to examine the structural relationship between Web 2.0 utilisation, knowledge quality (KQ) aspects, improvisational creativity, compositional creativity, and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) innovativeness in an emerging market – Malaysia. Built upon sense-making theory, this study proposes that sense making is a progression of four formative constructs. Empirical analyses are based on a sample from SMEs’ top management (N = 358, response rate = 21%) using partial least squares approach. The findings indicate that Web 2.0 utilisation influences business entities’ sense-making activities in the way they realise the intrinsic value of knowledge and take action to apply the organisational knowledge. These sense-making activities are conducive to improvisational and compositional creativity of SMEs as well. Contributions, managerial implications, and limitations are discussed.
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