Article

Enhancing Learning Via Community

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

If universities were serious about enhancing student learning, they would explore other ways of organizing work, including reorganization of the curriculum into learning communities that enable learning to span the disciplines, creating classrooms that promote collaborative learning experiences, and using forms of assessment that encourage shared discourse between faculty and students and provide information of immediate use in learning. (MSE)

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

... In some teacher preparation programs, the cohort structure has been shown to model community building within the teacher socialization process (Fullan, Galluzzo, Morris, & Watson, 1998; Koeppen, et al., 2000). A sense of community encouraged in cohort structures can foster learning and discourage the intellectual and professional isolation of teachers (Comer, 1996; DuFour & Eaker, 1998; Goodlad, 1994; Koeppen, et al., 2000; Tinto, 1997; Sergiovanni, 1994 ). A sizeable body of research exists on cohort groups in graduate programs, especially in educational administration (Hill, 1992; Wenzlaff & Wieseman, 2004). ...
... In this study the geographical isolation of the program was one additional aspect of the cohort which circumstantially bound the group together as a unit. Preservice teacher preparation programs that are implemented in cohort cycles tend to form natural learning communities due to the large number of classes that all students have together; they are a common feature of exemplary education programs (Eifler & Potthof, 1998; Fullan, 2001; Goodlad, 1994; Karsten, 1992; Norris & Barnett, 1994; Tinto, 1997). On the other hand, some research suggests that the lack of communities and cohorts in teacher preparation may contribute to the persisting pattern of teacher autonomy in schools (Fullan,Galluzzo, Morris & Watson, 1998). ...
... Another element of successful teacher preparation programs, supported by the research on student persistence, is academic and social integration through communities of learners (Tinto, 1997). A basic human need exists to achieve, to belong, and to feel significant (DuFour & Eaker, 1998). ...
Article
Thesis (Ed. D.)--Boise State University, 2000. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 239-253).
... Higher graduation rates for limited-residency doctoral programs require a unique platform to support the needs of students working on their dissertation. Given the recent emphasis on community in the literature and its affect on student satisfaction and learning (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000;Rovai 2002b;Shea, Li, & Pickett, 2006;Tinto, 1997), one approach (Tinto, 1997) suggests the development of communities of practice designed to enhance achievement by enabling students and faculty the opportunity to interact with each other and participate in collaborative experiences so that learning is shared among community members. ...
... Higher graduation rates for limited-residency doctoral programs require a unique platform to support the needs of students working on their dissertation. Given the recent emphasis on community in the literature and its affect on student satisfaction and learning (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000;Rovai 2002b;Shea, Li, & Pickett, 2006;Tinto, 1997), one approach (Tinto, 1997) suggests the development of communities of practice designed to enhance achievement by enabling students and faculty the opportunity to interact with each other and participate in collaborative experiences so that learning is shared among community members. ...
Article
Full-text available
Student attrition from distance and limited-residency doctoral programs is significantly higher than that from traditional programs. The focus of this paper is the development and application of a survey instrument, the Doctoral Student Connectedness Scale, designed to identify students at risk of dropout. The study focused exclusively on students currently working on their dissertations with results indicating that low feelings of student-to-student and student-to-faculty connectedness in the learning environment may be predictive of departure from the program. This study supports the work of Lovitts (2001) and others who have also recognized connectedness as an integral part of the dissertation experience. Recommendations are made for addressing these issues through various initiatives that administrators, faculty, and students can support including the design and development of a doctoral student community of practice (CoP).
... Collaborative learning (Smith & MacGregor, 1992), conditioned on enhanced interactivity, individual accountability and teamwork is underpinned by the theories of constructivism (Piaget, 1952) and the sociocultural theory of learning (Vygotsky, 1980). It is also recognized that adoption of collaborative learning fosters social interaction (Tinto, 1997), develops high order thinking skills (Webb, 1982), embraces diversity (Loes et al., 2018) and leads to higher motivational levels of learning (Astin, 1977). ...
... given the fact that friends from social media will begin to exert influence on each other. Tinto (1997) argued that extracurricular activities and academic activities are not enough to satisfy those students who are suffered by social networking isolation. This shows that social networks are beneficial for the students as it contributes in their learning experiences as well as in their academic life. ...
... İşbirliği her derste, her konuda ve her yaş grubu öğrenciyle yapılabilirken (Johson & Johnson, 1998) işbirlikli öğrenme, dikkatli bir planlama gerektirir (Westwood, 2008) ve uygun şekilde kullanılınca, öğrenme hızları farklı olan öğrencilerin dahi (Wilkinson, 1994) akademik başarılarının artışında etkilidir (Johnson & Johnson, 1999). Hem erkek hem de kız öğrencilerin liderlik yeteneklerini artırır (Bean, 1996), bireysel ortamda ve sınıf ortamlarında daha etkili iletişim becerileri geliştirmelerine ve akademik ilişkiler kurmalarına olanak sağlar (Tinto, 1997). ...
Article
Full-text available
Bu araştırmanın amacı, işbirlikli öğrenme modelinin uygulanmasında kullanılan Jigsaw ve Birlikte Soralım Birlikte Öğrenelim (BSBÖ) yöntemlerinin 6. sınıf öğrencilerinin Sosyal Bilgiler dersi akademik başarıları üzerindeki etkisini tespit etmektir. Araştırmada öntest-sontest kontrol gruplu deneysel desen kullanılmıştır. Araştırmanın çalışma grubunu 2015-2016 eğitim-öğretim yılında Trabzon ilinde bir ortaokulun 3 farklı şubesinde öğrenim gören toplam 54 altıncı sınıf öğrencisi oluşturmaktadır. Araştırma iki deney, bir kontrol grubu ile yürütülmüştür. İlgili ünitenin öğretimi araştırma gruplarında 4 hafta süreyle ilgili yöntemler uygulanarak gerçekleştirilmiştir. Araştırmada veri toplama aracı olarak Akademik Başarı Testi (ABT) kullanılmıştır. Deney ve Kontrol grubu öğrencilerinin ABT öntest ve sontest puanları ANOVA ve ANCOVA ile analiz edilmiştir. Deney grubunda yer alan Jigsaw ile BSBÖ grubu öğrencilerinin öntest- sontest puanları arasında anlamlı bir farkın olmadığı, deney grupları ile kontrol grubu arasında ise anlamlı bir farkın olduğu sonucuna ulaşılmıştır.
... Vrasidas and Mclsaac (1999) expressed that teaching objectives could be achieved by interaction strategies. According to the methods used in interaction strategies, students need to take an active role in the process (Tinto, 1997). During the active role stage, a learning method based on cooperation was used, among other methods, to increase the learning experience and effectiveness of students (Curtis & Lawson, 2001). ...
Article
Full-text available
In the online learning environment, it is seen that problems arise in the absence of interaction. In order to prevent these problems, this study, which was carried out by taking into consideration the principles that are formed using the community of inquiry framework, took place during the 2014-2015 Spring Semester using 30 students from a vocational college located in the Turkish Mediterranean Region who enrolled in the "Graphic Animation" course. The study was used a pretest-posttest control group design. The control group constituted of students working with online problem based individual methods while the experimental group constituted of students working with online problem based collaborative learning methods. The groups were compared in terms of academic success, motivation and satisfaction. It was determined that the motivation was higher in the experimental group, while there was no difference in the achievement and satisfaction in the experimental group and the control group.
... Online platforms should be designed in manner that provides opportunities for interaction between teachersstudents and students-students because interaction is the key variable that influences the quality of online learning (Phipps, 2015). Collaborative learning method can be used to facilitate interaction among peers, working in groups increase students satisfaction , increases students participation and cultivates social relationship (Tinto, 1997). This study suggested teachers and institutions to strengthen the features liked by their students including involvement and interaction, flexibility, comfort and accessibility of materials and to modify elements that hinder their learning in online environment that include poor network connection, distraction, lack of support and concentration, etc. Further, teachers are suggested to do need-analysis of their students, especially disabled students and to provide instruction accordingly. ...
Article
Full-text available
Considering the sudden shift to online teaching due to COVID-19 pandemic, a qualitative survey was conducted on 408 students to uncover their perspectives on online teaching-learning. The data, collected by questionnaire, were analyzed, using percentage and frequency. Results indicated that students were enjoying online learning. Flexibility was found to be the most liked and poor network and connectivity, the most disliked elements of online learning. Adding to it, lack of interaction, distractions and one-sided learning were mentioned as its disadvantages. Online safety and security issues were not addressed and disabled students experienced teachers' negligence and lack of support.
... Cooperative learning is a modern and active learning model that small heterogeneous groups composed of students with different qualifications in terms of success, ability, gender, intelligence etc. create a team spirit for common purposes and study, where each student is responsible for his or her own learning and group friends' learning, develop students' self-esteem, thinking abilities at a high level, problem solving and inter-personal relationships, ensures a high level of success and improves their cognitive sides such as critical thinking, supports good communication, team work, students' taking responsibility, developing their leadership skills and social skills such as reconciliation, where students establish academic relationships, groups gain awards depending on their performances and a student-centered education environment is provided (Açıkgöz, 1992(Açıkgöz, , 2006Bean 1996;Christison, 1990;Doymuş et. al., 2005;Gillies, 2006;Gömleksiz, 1993;Hanze & Berger, 2007;Hennessy & Evans, 2006;Kagan, 1994;Senemoğlu, 2005;Shachar & Fischer, 2004;Slavin, 1980bSlavin, , 1987Slavin, , 1988Şimşek, 2005;Tinto, 1997). The cooperative learning technique has positive effects on students. ...
Article
Full-text available
Article History This study aims to develop a new cooperative learning technique and to examine the effectiveness of this technique. In the study, action research pattern, in which one of the qualitative research methods was used. The study included 12 male and 8 female students, in total 20 students, studying at 5th grade of a secondary school in Van province of Turkey in second semester of 2015-2016 academic year. The study was conducted for 4 times a week over the course of 8 weeks in "Let's Meet the World of Living Creatures", "A Must of our Lives: Electric" and "The Mystery of Earth" units of science class. This study consisted of three phases. The first draft form of the "question jury" technique was formed as a result of the literature research at the first stage. At the second stage, "question jury" draft form was applied to the mentioned group for 4 weeks and the "question jury" application was put into its final form in the light of the obtained data. The developed "question jury" was applied to the same group for 4 weeks at the third stage. The data in the study were collected using semi-structured interview form, observation forms, student diaries, video recordings and "information card form". Content and descriptive analysis methods were used to analyze the data. As a result of the analyses, "cognitive learning", "affective learning", "assessment" and "process" themes and various codes under these themes were formed. As a result; it was determined that, this technique developed was in accordance with the principles of cooperative learning, it increased students' conceptual levels, students found the technique useful, simple and understandable, this application led them to study the course and to research the knowledge, the students enjoyed the participation and they helped students to make self-assessment and contributed to their personal development.
... This approach was a success from the level of engagement and understanding of the students. Collaboration Learning helps to develop learning communities within classes and institutions (Laal &Ghodsi, 2012;Tinto, V., 1997). ...
Article
Full-text available
Threatened by cultural modernization, many emotions and manifestations of living heritage or intangible cultural heritage (ICH) are under crisis. The non-formal education initiative of living heritage conservation focused on preserving and passing the skills and knowledge, practices, expression, and instruments of local people on to future generations effectively. By using the literature review as an analysis method, this paper identified the best non-formal education initiative and the significance of living heritage conservation education for the community. In conclusion, quality education of living heritage conservation, not only fulfills people's needs but also helps unite and empower both local people and the community to sustain the living heritage efficiently. Keywords: Intangible cultural heritage; Non-formal education; Public awareness; Quality education eISSN 2398-4279 ©2020 The Authors. Published for AMER ABRA cE-Bs by e-International Publishing House, Ltd., UK. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Peer–review under responsibility of AMER (Association of Malaysian Environment-Behaviour Researchers), ABRA (Association of Behavioural Researchers on Asians) and cE-Bs (Centre for Environment-Behaviour Studies), Faculty of Architecture, Planning & Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.DOI: https://doi.org/10.21834/ajqol.v5i18.205
... The students who are also team members get to frequently get in touch with each other to get assistance for the nagging questions or issues that they are having and they often continue to communicate with each other, even at a later stage of their studies [20]. Collaborative Learning aids in developing learning circles within classes, colleges and institutes [21]. ...
Article
Full-text available
In the modern era, the education system has undergone a huge paradigm shift. Traditional classroom teaching methodologies that used to work like wonder, no longer attract the students of the present generation. Higher education, especially, engineering education has been greatly impacted by this paradigm shift and things are rapidly moving away from traditional methods to more advanced and innovative active learning strategies. Collaborative Learning is one of the popular forms of active learning and caters to the needs of millennial learners of today. This study deals with the impact of Team-Games-Tournament (TGT), which is one of the Collaborative Learning techniques. The outcomes of this small experiment clearly show that when Collaborative Learning is leveraged well, it surely results in better learning among the students.
... From the level of engagement and understanding of these students, this approach was a success. Collaboration Learning helps to develop learning communities within classes and institutions (Laal & Ghodsi, 2012;Tinto, V., 1997). In Singapore, Heritage Education highlights 2017 on 1) Pre-school and Primary and 2) Secondary and Tertiary as part of the heritage education life cycle approach (Singapore National Heritage Board, 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
Living Heritage or intangible cultural heritage (ICH) defined as human skills and knowledge, practices, expression, and instruments that form the transmitted practices of local people. By a lack of responsibility, recognition, and education, many emotions and manifestations of ICH are under crisis, threatened by globalization and cultural modernization. This paper provided the literature review as an analysis method and discussed the significance of Living Heritage Conservation Education for the Community. In conclusion, the key a quality education, which in the Community-based Education for Living Heritage Conservation, not only fulfills people's needs but also helps link and empower both local people and the community to conserve the living heritage successfully.Keywords: Community-based Education; Intangible cultural heritage; Public awareness; Quality education.eISSN: 2398-4287 © 2020. The Authors. Published for AMER ABRA cE-Bs by e-International Publishing House, Ltd., UK. This is an open access article under the CC BYNC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Peer–review under responsibility of AMER (Association of Malaysian Environment-Behaviour Researchers), ABRA (Association of Behavioural Researchers on Asians) and cE-Bs (Centre for Environment-Behaviour Studies), Faculty of Architecture, Planning & Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.
... Yet, putting students into groups is often the only step many instructors take before asking them to complete a task. This is problematic because skills and attitudes necessary for effective collaboration do • promotes intercultural and interpersonal skill development [9,[17][18][19][20][21][22]; • fosters a sense of community and support among peers [23,24]; • increase students' social networks [14,22]; • encourages democracy outcomes such as: perspective taking, civic engagement, racial/cultural engagement, and compatibility of difference [25]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Many classrooms in higher education are becoming increasingly diverse. Diversity is an asset when student interactions are promoted and facilitated by instructors. The challenge is, many times students are grouped together for a collaborative project without attention to or skilled support for the learning and development that can occur through the intercultural collaborative process itself. Instructors often assume this learning happens automatically or organically and does not need to be acted upon explicitly. However, collaboration skills do not come naturally; simply putting students in groups is not enough. When collaboration is facilitated skillfully it benefits all students, especially those from marginalized and historically underserved groups. Here, we enumerate barriers instructors face in supporting groups, describe/share a model, and explore the implementation of this model in a general chemistry lab, which relies heavily on group work. We found that these activities are feasible in a large STEM class, that students participated and found value in them, and that they enhanced students’ content learning and the development of cross-cutting competencies sought by employers. We hope after reading this paper, instructors will recognize the responsibility and opportunity they have in supporting interactions, and have new inspiration and a pathway to do so.
... Additionally, they find a solution for social problems which may arise (Johnson and Johnson, 1985). Learning communities are built through collaborative learning (Tinto, 1997). Psychological benefits include an improved self-esteem (Johnson et al., 1998). ...
Thesis
Companies and organizations must constantly evolve in order to stay competitive in the marketplace. An important role is played by innovations that ensure this continuous corporate success. Producing innovations depends strongly on creativity, which is why active support makes sense and is worthwhile. Creativity can be supported by information technology and is most effective in teams and groups. Collaboration and the consideration of different collaboration mechanisms play an equally important role in this context as the active support by information technology. This dissertation deals with the question of how information systems can be designed in order to use information technology to actively support creativity and that collaborative creativity processes are promoted. With the help of a systematic literature review, current creativity support systems were examined and the necessity of research was explained. A design-oriented approach was then used to develop and evaluate various approaches that address the research question. A total of 25 scientific articles were produced, five of which are included in this dissertation. Various conducted studies show the additional value of active support through information technology and provide design guidelines for better support of collaborative creativity.
... Learning communities in postsecondary classrooms can be defined in many ways. The overarching theme, however, is "shared learning" among a common group of students in a "connected learning" environment between several disciplines (Tinto 1997). These goals are accomplished by co-registration of a cohort of students in separate courses that are linked by a theme, shared curricular goals, or similar student characteristics (Andrade 2007;Lenning and Ebbers 1999;MacGregor 1991). ...
Article
Full-text available
Learning communities, the co-registration of student cohorts sharing curricular goals, are often associated with greater academic achievement, retention, inclusivity, and engagement. While not all previous studies unequivocally demonstrate a positive learning community effect on performance, many suggest that students participating in learning communities identify a greater sense of community and interaction with their peers and instructors. Few studies, however, have compiled both academic metrics of success as well as multiple quantitative measures of academic engagement. Moreover, few studies have contrasted these metrics to roughly equivalent classes where the only difference was linkage by a learning community, while holding course content, semester, and instructor constant. Our research goal was to compare academic performance, retention, student background, and engagement of students participating in learning communities to those in similar but unlinked sections. We found no significant differences in academic performance, student background, or engagement between linked learning community classes and unlinked, freestanding sections of the same class. We also found student retention was lower in learning community sections compared to unlinked sections. Some of our findings may reflect our student population of a non-residential, commuter campus where building relationships may be more difficult. We suggest that other metrics of success, including those that quantify interdisciplinary knowledge or skills and collaboration, may better reflect gains of success in learning community environments.
... College impact models allow student affairs administrators to make data informed decisions that remove obstacles to student retention, success, completion, and graduation (Skipper, 2005). Astin's (1984) and Tinto (1996Tinto ( , 1997Tinto ( , 1998 proposed models of student engagement, retention, and attrition are examples of college impact theories. However, these models again were developed using research based on traditional aged, upper middle-class, first-time to college students at four-year colleges and universities (Woolsley, 2011). ...
Article
Full-text available
The seminal theories that describe human development during the college years were developed several decades ago using research conducted with homogenous groups of college students that resemble the demographic characteristics of 21 st Century college students in very few ways. The current population is more diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, age, socioeconomic status, academic preparation, immigration status, and disability than the college student population has ever been in the history of higher education. This review highlights recent research on how the current diverse population of college students interacts within the campus environment. The review considers the current research on how college affects 21 st century college students, and how students develop in terms of career, cognitive, and psychological development during the college years. Also important to consider is the kind of social and cultural capital that diverse college students bring to college that helps them achieve academic and career success.
... The students all expressed interest in a science-based, non-health professional career. The goal of the program was to explicitly create the kind of community of scholars with a shared goal of earning STEM degrees that Astin and others suggest are critical to enhancing learning (Astin 1993;Boyer 1990;Tinto 1997). Our program requirements also allowed us to strongly encourage participants onto the dark blue "islands" in Figure 1 and thus reinforce their desire to pursue a STEM degree. ...
Article
Full-text available
Through a qualitative study of a cohort of 15 STEM majors in a scholarship program using reflective essays and interviews, we examined the significant experiences that helped students decide to remain in a STEM major. We identified that students enter with deficiencies in knowledge of 1) the expectations of a research based science career, 2) the breadth of science careers, and 3) the path necessary to reach a career. We utilized a number of interventions to engage students with practicing scientists and saw students 1) identify/solidify a potential career path, 2) accept the uncertainty of a career path, and 3) develop and better understand how they can fit into the science community. We provide recommendations for minor steps to improve the early undergraduate student experiences to overcome some of these major challenges.
... One method to improve undergraduate science education is the creation of residential colleges or similar forms of learning communities (Bean & Kuh, 1984;Tinto, 1997;Zhao & Kuh, 2004). These residential learning communities have great impact by blurring "the boundaries between students' academic and social lives, and the evidence indicated clearly and consistently that they succeeded" (Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005). ...
Article
Michigan State University’s Lyman Briggs College (LBC) is a residential, undergraduate college devoted to studying the natural sciences with an understanding of the history, philosophy, and sociology of science. LBC is the longest-running program of its kind at a large U.S. research university and offers its students the close-knit living-learning community of a liberal arts college and diverse resources and opportunities of a research university. LBC has succeeded in developing a strong residential science learning community that supports its students by creating a culture of engagement in science and employing student-centered learning techniques. This has resulted in a first-year retention rate of approximately 95% (92% in STEM) and a six-year university graduation rate of approximately 85% (more than 70% in STEM with equal retention of male and female students). LBC can therefore provide a useful case study for approaches that lead to student retention and success in STEM fields.
... Socially, collaborative learning promotes student-teacher interaction and familiarity (Cooper et al., 1984); develops social interaction skills (Johnson et al., 1984); promotes positive societal responses to problems and fosters a supportive environment within which to manage conflict resolution (Johnson & Johnson, 1990); creates a stronger social support system (Cohen & Willis, 1985); fosters and develops interpersonal relationships (Johnson & Johnson, 1987); builds more positive heterogeneous relationships (Webb, 1980); encourages diversity understanding (Burnstein & McRae, 1962); fosters a greater ability in students to view situations from others' perspectives (development of empathy) (Yager et al., 1985b); establishes an atmosphere of cooperation and helping school wide (Deutsch, 1985); fosters team building and a team approach to problem solving while maintaining individual accountability (Cooper et al., 1984;Johnson et al., 1984); creates environments where students can practice building leadership skills (Johnson & Johnson, 1990;Bean, 1996); increases leadership skills of female students (Bean, 1996); provides the foundation for developing learning communities within institutions and in courses (Tinto, 1997); helps teachers change their roles from their being the focus of the teaching process to becoming facilitators of the learning process. They move from teachercentered to student-centered learning (Hertz-Lazarowitz et al., 1992). ...
Article
Full-text available
Recognition that traditional forms of university course delivery are inappropriate in preparing students for a dynamic workforce in a post-industrialist, knowledge society (Drucker, 1995) has been well documented. Collaborative learning, where implemented has been recognised as an effective transition factor in supporting the development of higher order cognitive abilities (Johnson &
... the Designers' theOretical PersPective anD guiDing framewOrk Rovai (2002) suggested that faculty and administration can decrease the attrition rate by influencing a student's level of satisfaction and commitment. Studies reveal that one successful way of decreasing attrition is to get students to feel like they are connected to their academic programs by creating communities (Tinto, 1997;Rovai, 2002). Wenger, Mc-Dermott, and Snyder (2002) define communities of practice as "groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing basis" (p. ...
Article
Full-text available
This design case describes phase one (pilot phase) of an intervention strategy aimed to support students in a limited–residency doctoral program. Specifically, this case documents the process and decisions that were made along the way to design an online research community of practice (CoP) for students who have completed coursework and are working on their dissertations in the field of instructional design and technology. The case includes the designers’ guiding framework, a detailed description of the case including the site, participant and platform selection, and the preliminary state of the design. To date, a design team is in place, a guiding framework for the design of the CoP is established, a needs analysis has been conducted, the participants have been identified, the CoP strategy has been defined, the site has launched, and students are just now beginning to become a part of this online community. It will take time to cultivate the community and determine whether the design is effective in achieving the community’s goals. Data collection and documentation of design decisions continue as the design and development of the online CoP emerges.
... The interaction also may result in stronger social support systems and development of vibrant learning communities within the class (Cohen & Willis, 1985). The subsequent supportive learning environment encourages better learning, increased interest to learn and academic competition (Johnson & Johnson, 1990; Tinto 1997), all of which synergistically promote SDL. Similarly, Springer, Stanne, and Donovan (1997) in their analysis of comparative studies of small-group and individual education, concluded that collaboration as facilitated by electronic tools such as MEP, promote better academic achievement, more suitable attitudes towards learning, and increased resilience in subsequent courses and throughout the study program. ...
Article
Full-text available
Fostering student interest in self-directed learning (SDL) requires appropriate skills and innovative strategies by the teacher. However, many teachers find motivating students for SDL a challenging expectation. This paper, based on literature and authors' experience discusses how Moodle e-learning platform (MEP) has been used to successfully promote SDL among undergraduate nursing students at Sultan Qaboos University, College of Nursing, in Oman. We conclude that MEP enhances students' pre-class preparation, post-class participation and overall motivation for learning and that it is a user-friendly and affordable innovative teaching strategy that can be used to motivate, promote and sustain student interest in SDL. (C) 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
... The goal of a learning community is to advance collective knowledge by supporting the growth of individual knowledge (Bielaczyc & Collins, 1999). For example, Tinto (1997) suggests that learning communities can enhance student learning by enabling students and faculty to interact with each other and participate in collaborative learning experiences. Online learning communities can help students in distance education programs feel more connected to their professors and classmates. ...
Article
Full-text available
The Internet provides a powerful delivery system for learning. With improvements in web-based applications and information technology come new opportunities and challenges for educators to design, develop, and deliver effective instruction. Over the past few years, an increasing amount of research has been devoted to the design of online learning communities that embrace learning as a social and constructive process. As online learning matures, it is important for both theorists and practitioners to understand how to apply new and emerging educational practices and technologies that foster a sense of community and optimize the online learning environment. To accomplish this goal, it is critical that researchers continue testing instructional-design theories and models in different online contexts and either build upon those theories and models or develop new ones that will provide appropriate and relevant guidance. This article proposes an instructional-design theory that supports a sense of community. The theory may also serve as the basis for further development of specific instructional design prescriptions for how to use some of the new and emerging web tools that are available in the Read/Write Web such as blogs, wikis, podcasts, and virtual worlds, to create a sense of community among adult learners. This theory originates from formative research conducted to design an online learning community for older adults in non-academic settings. In this article, situations that describe when a particular method works best were added to suggest how this theory might apply to adults enrolled in online graduate programs. (Contains 1 table.)
... Students will contact each other to get help with questions or problems they are having, and they will often continue their communications in later terms (Bean, J., 1996). CL helps to develop learning communities within classes and institutions (Tinto, V., 1997). As students are actively involved in interacting with each other on a regular basis in an instructed mode, they are able to understand their differences and learn how to resolve social problems which may arise ( ...
Article
Full-text available
Collaborative learning is an educational approach to teaching and learning that involves groups of learners working together to solve a problem, complete a task, or create a product. This review article outlines benefits of learning in collaboration style, begins with the concept of the term and continues with the advantages created by collaborative methods. This paper sets out major benefits of collaborative learning into four categories of; social, psychological, academic, and assessment benefits. Each of them is further subdivided to more specific themes.
... ) identifies " learner activity and interacting with others " as two critical characteristics of rich (and therefore engaging) learning and teaching environments. Tinto (1997, 1) has long argued that students need to be engaged in active and collaborative, rather than passive, " spectator sport " learning, commenting that " shared learning should be the norm, not the exception, of first year experience " . Designing curricula for active learning can therefore be seen as critical to achieving student engagement in the first year. ...
Article
Full-text available
The importance of student engagement to higher education quality, making deep learning outcomes possible for students, and achieving student retention, is increasingly being understood. The issue of student engagement in the first year of tertiary study is of particular significance. This paper takes the position that the first year curriculum, and the pedagogical principles that inform its design, are critical influencers of student engagement in the first year learning environment. We use an analysis of case studies prepared for Kift’s ALTC Senior Fellowship to demonstrate ways in which student engagement in the first year of tertiary study can be successfully supported through intentional curriculum design that motivates students to learn, provides a positive learning climate, and encourages students to be active in their learning.
Chapter
L’actualité de l’enjeu de l’intégration des technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC) en éducation nous pousse à nous interroger sur les répercussions positives que le numérique peut avoir sur le processus d’apprentissage des élèves. Bien que l’accessibilité du savoir n’ait jamais été aussi facile grâce aux nouvelles technologies, il n’en demeure pas moins que l’école reste le lieu principal de l’apprentissage des jeunes. Or, comment faire cohabiter ces deux espaces, virtuel et réel ? Nous appuyant sur un cadre conceptuel socioconstructiviste inspiré des travaux de Lev Vygotsky, nous nous questionnons sur l’utilité du numérique dans la construction sociale et culturelle des connaissances. Cet article porte sur la médiation des savoirs par le numérique en contexte de classe inversée. Le postulat suivant est développé dans cet article : sans interaction sociale, le numérique n’est qu’un instrument de médiatisation des savoirs. Les interactions et les échanges que l’on retrouve dans les activités en classes seraient indispensables pour qu’il y ait une co-construction des apprentissages en contexte de classe inversée, le numérique ne venant que médier cette construction. Afin d’appuyer notre hypothèse, nous avons retenu les travaux suivants pour en faire une analyse des écrits : Guilbault & Viau-Guay (2017) ; Harvey et Charnitski (2003) ; Hétu (2014) ; Blanton, Greene et Cole (1999) ; Raucent et Wouters (2016) ; Rinaudo (2015). L’analyse de ces six articles scientifiques tente de mettre en lumière l’importance des interactions sociales à la suite de la consommation de contenus numériques à la maison afin qu’il y ait construction des savoirs chez l’élève.
Article
Full-text available
My partner Amélie Boyer and I, wrote a little article in a students collective review based on the social constructivism theory of Vygotsky. This review was create in a university class given by Sylvie Barma and Mélanie Gauthier.
Article
The purpose of this study is to uncover factors that affect participation in online classes from the student’s perspective. Interest in the online environment has been increasing and renders the opinions of students participating in online courses more important since the opinions of students in this environment are closely related to interaction. It has been seen that lack of interaction creates a sense of loneliness, which causes students to drop their classes. For this reason, a qualitative study has been conducted about student experiences on the use of methods that increase interaction in an online environment and participation. Participants were given tasks based on collaboration, special attention was paid to make sure that the setting in which the participants found themselves was in accordance with the principles of the community of inquiry, computerized equipment was used to facilitate online interactions. 15 students worked based on collaboration and 15 students worked individually. Data was collected with interviews and reflection reports. Open, axial and selective coding was made by using the theorizing method. At the end of the study, it was determined that participation in online environment was affected in both groups by factors such as personal approaches, changing variables, mediated attributes.
Article
To reach their goals, companies are on a never-ending search to find new methods for innovation. In order to tackle the complex problems, which cannot be solved by a single person, the implementation of teamwork is assumed to be applicable. With this paper, we propose a framework for Collaboration Support Systems, which aims to enhance team performance. We outline the differences between teams and groups and examine collective processes that on the one hand benefit from additional knowledge and mutual stimulation, but on the other hand are negatively influenced by various cognitive and social factors. With basic principles of collaboration, we seek to tackle the negative effects of team performance and try to further enhance the benefits of collective work. In this context, we analyzed group support systems and unified research and practice of various disciplines (like collaborative problem-solving, collaborative decision making, collaborative creativity and collaborative learning), in order to develop a framework for Collaboration Support Systems. Our paper addresses on-going topics (like anonymity in collaboration systems) and presents design principles for software engineers. Based on a comprehensive literature analysis, we introduce several principles and aspects for collaboration systems that can help to better understand collaboration in teams. However, to thoroughly understand the phenomenon of digital collaboration, further research is needed.
Article
This paper investigated how senior management is motivated to commit to information system (IS) security. Research shows senior management participation is critical to successful IS security, but has not explained how senior managers are motivated to participate in IS security. Information systems research shows pressures external to the organization have greater influence on senior managers than internal pressures. However, research has not fully examined how external pressures motivate senior management participation in IS security. This study addressed that gap by examining how external pressures motivate senior management participation in ISS through the lens of neo-institutional theory. The research design was survey research. Data collection was through an online survey, and PLS was used for data analysis. Sample size was 167 from a study population of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in a mix of industries in the south-central United States. Results supported three of six hypotheses. Mimetic mechanisms were found to influence senior management belief in IS security, and senior management belief in IS security was found to increase senior management participation in IS security. Greater senior management participation in IS security led to greater IS security assimilation in organizations. Three hypotheses were not supported. Correlation was not found between normative influences and senior management belief, normative influences and senior management participation, and coercive influences and senior management participation. This study shows IS security-related mimetic influences have greater impact on senior leaders of SMEs than coercive or normative influences, which may be explained by the absorptive capacity of SMEs. Absorptive capacity refers to the ability of an organization to assimilate a technology. However, absorptive capacity may affect more than just technology assimilation, and may extend to how senior management responds to external influences
Article
The Collaborative Learner-constructed Engineering-concept Articulation and Representation (CLEAR) model was used to explore how the introduction of visually represented materials and the use of blended instruction (i.e., online class sessions, group concept visualization projects, threaded discussions, etc.) impact the sense of community students experience with their peers in the classroom in comparison to a more traditionally taught class. Results reveal that implementation of some of these concepts can result in better retention in a sophomore level chemical engineering course, with student work and course satisfaction at or above the level of those completing a traditional version of the course. The use of online course work was also found to effectively replace some classroom experiences in the blended delivery section. However, an implication of this blended delivery was increased time requirements reported by both faculty and students.
Conference Paper
In this paper we present our findings from the FoodWeb2.0 project about success indicators and restraints while implementing Web2.0 based learning processes. We conducted two courses with the same content with two different target groups from the German food industry: one with regular employees and one with teachers of dedicated education facilities. Comparing the performance of the two courses by triangulating methods from Social Network Analysis and quantitative and qualitative surveys, we identified indicators for the successful implementation and differences in the motivation of learners and teachers. These findings illustrate the need for strategies involving and motivating teachers when introducing modern learning methods and tools within the food industry and other related branches.
Article
This case study focuses on the usage of Web as a delivery mode for open and distance learning programmes in India. It describes the designing and delivering of a postgraduate level academic programme at Indira Gandhi National Open University. The university has been struggling with teething problems tied to the initial stage of acquisition of an online learning platform. It is a bit of an extensive chapter, as it documents academic and administrative policies being practiced by the largest university in the world to overcome these problems. The objective of this case study is to reflect on the evolution process and to identify conducive factors for successful delivery of online programmes. The interpretative case study methodology also facilitates distinguishing the evidence-based best practices. Access to technology and its robustness are the main constraints in delivery of education through online platforms for any developing country. The online programmes are able to attract a good number of foreign students. The institution has to concurrently put in place a policy framework covering aspects like: friendliness to the online interface; standardization of design, delivery, and assessment of the online programmes; recognition to the teachers and administrative staff involved in online programmes; and the use of open educational resources. This case study provides valuable insight for foreign universities ready to plunge into the vast higher education market in India and other developing countries without crossing political borders. It is also very helpful for universities, which are either planning or in the initial stage of acquiring online learning platforms.
Article
Full-text available
Approximately 50% of doctoral students in social science, humanities, and educational doctoral programs fail to earn their Ph.D. This number is 10% to 15% higher for students enrolled in online or limited-residency programs. Using in-depth interviews and qualitative data analysis techniques, this grounded-theory study examined participants’ recollections of their experience as students in a limited-residency doctoral program and their reasons for withdrawal while working on their dissertation. The study was guided by the central question “What is the nature of the participants’ experiences of doctoral attrition in a limited-residency doctoral program?” The resultant theory clarified relationships between attrition and a support issues (i.e., advisor support, dissertation process support and program office support). The theoretical model helps identify steps faculty and administration may take in order to reduce high levels of attrition. Recommendations for effective doctoral education practices from existing literature are supported in the findings of this study. © 2015: Donna H. Kennedy, Steven R. Terrell, Michael Lohle, and Nova Southeastern University.
Article
There is an impressive amount of quantitative evidence documenting positive student outcomes of learning communities in terms of retention and academic performance (Hotchkiss, Moore, & Pitts, 2006; Tinto, 2000; Zhao & Kuh, 2004). While this quantitative information significantly contributes to our knowledge about learning communities, it represents only one view of the experience. The purpose of this study is to examine the enduring qualities of learning communities at a large public institution in the southeast using both qualitative and quantitative data. Narratives from focus groups conducted with junior and senior students are combined with quantitative academic performance and survey data, including the 2008 National Survey of Student Engagement. Findings from this study provide further support for the value-added lasting effects of participating in learning communities. This research addresses curriculum implications for faculty and provides support for the creation and structuring of learning community programs. This study also represents a useful research model of multiple methodologies that yields both qualitative and quantitative data and provides a richer understanding and more in depth picture of the learning community experience.
Article
Full-text available
The intent of this study was to investigate 93 doctoral candidates' perceptions and use of an online collaboration workspace and content management server, Microsoft Office SharePoint, for dissertation process. All candidates were enrolled in an Ed.D. programme in the United States. Descriptive statistics demonstrate that candidates frequently use SharePoint for a variety of reasons, including assisting them in sharing and gaining information, improving the flow and organisation of the dissertation process and collaborating with their advisors mentors, in the dissertation process. Results of the multivariate analysis of variance demonstrated that doctoral students' who extensively use SharePoint have significantly higher student-to-student connectedness and student-to-advisors connectedness than doctoral students who use it moderately and on a limited basis. Additional results revealed that sense of connectedness and satisfaction are positively associated with the different features of SharePoint. Since using SharePoint to facilitate the mentorship during the dissertation process is positively associated with connectedness and satisfaction, it may positively influence completion and time to completion of a doctoral programme.
Chapter
Vocational training is much more dependent on external factors and thus much less self-contained than education and instruction in general public schools. Based on experience gathered in recent projects, the potential of using innovative web-based technologies to support teachers and students in this complex situation are illustrated and discussed. As for the technologies, the focus is on web 2.0 approaches, thus facilitating the creation and sharing of content on the part teachers and learners. From an educational design point of view, a special focus is the support of teachers through “pedagogical patterns” accompanied by empowering them to better manage and share web resources in their teaching. Issues of organizational culture and change management turn out to be decisive for the success of such approaches.
Article
In examining the contexts of learning for L2 English bilinguals, educators and researchers may have ignored an important feature of that context, the social/academic relationships the learners develop with native-English-speaking peers. Long considered a means of promoting learning and independence among students, group work is one domain where such social/academic interactions occur in university-level courses across the curriculum in English-dominant countries. The research reported here details the experiences of two nonnative-English-speaking (NNES) students in course-sponsored group projects. The findings suggest that the particular social/academic relationships that develop within work groups may undermine the ability of NNES students to make meaningful contributions to the group projects. Furthermore, even group projects that appear to work well may conceal particular burdens for NNES students of which faculty who assign group projects may remain unaware.
Article
Learning communities, designed primarily to increase student persistence and academic achievement, are a common first-year initiative on university campuses. Assessments of learning communities frequently examine indicators that are easily quantifiable such as student persistence and academic achievement, but also examine factors thought to affect these outcomes such as student involvement and satisfaction. This article reviews published studies to determine the degree to which learning communities successfully affect involvement, satisfaction, achievement, and persistence, and attempts to identify the characteristics that produce positive results. The review concludes that first, learning communities do attain positive outcomes, but second, that it is difficult to determine which characteristics of learning communities (i.e., integrated course content, coordinated assignments, academic skills training, mentoring) account for their success due to the small number of studies, the heterogeneity of programs, and self-selection effects.
Article
Full-text available
Limited-residency and online doctoral programs have an attrition rate significantly higher than traditional programs. This grounded-theory study focused on issues pertaining to communication between students, their peers and faculty and how interpersonal communication may affect persistence. Data were collected from 17 students actively working on their dissertation in a limited-residency educational technology program. The resultant theory indicated that students felt communication between themselves and peers is possible but not common. Students also indicated that dissertation supervisors are readily accessible but longer than expected response times may contribute to a lack of student success. The results suggest the development and effective use of an online community of practice will support the communication needs of students and faculty. © 2012: Steven R. Terrell, Martha M. Snyder, Laurie P. Dringus, Elizabeth Maddrey, and Nova Southeastern University.
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a straightforward technique for engaging students and building a sense of community in the university classroom by allowing students to give brief extra‐credit presentations on topics of personal interest. Design/methodology/approach – The paper includes an overview of the literature related to engagement and “sense of community,” a discussion of the motivation for incorporating “off‐topic” presentations in the university classroom, a description of the presentation requirements and grading practices, and comments on the results of employing the presentations. Because individual perceptions were the goal of this research, survey methodology was used. All items were measured on a five‐point Likert scale and administered to students at the end of the most recent term. Findings – Using survey results, factor analysis, and regression, the paper finds that the presentations increased student attentiveness and fostered a sense of community in the classes in which the presentations were employed. Originality/value – This research presents a unique method – the use of off‐topic presentations – to increase sense of community in the university classroom.
Article
Major changes in mathematics pedagogy include writing as pedagogy and the role of community in learning. The classroom community is naturally extended by the use of online discussion boards. In this article several models for student use of online discussion boards that have been successfully used to promote mathematical discourse are presented. Structured and unstructured examples that are easily adaptable and transportable to a variety of mathematics classroom settings are offered. These assignments facilitate student engagement and interaction outside of the classroom. Assessment, utility, and transferability are offered. Although the authors use the discussion boards provided by Blackboard, this particular software package is not necessary.
Article
Cooperative learning employs a variety of motivational techniques. This chapter outlines the many benefits of cooperative learning in terms of its motivational impact.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.