Article

Benefits of physical therapy on executive functions in older people with Parkinson's disease

UNESP, São Paulo State University at Rio Claro, SP, Brazil.
Brain and Cognition (Impact Factor: 2.48). 12/2008; 69(2):435-41. DOI: 10.1016/j.bandc.2008.09.008
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The benefits of physical exercise on cognitive functioning have been reported in the literature, but the potential benefits to slow the eventual decline in executive functioning (EF) caused by neurodegeneration from Parkinson's Disease (PD) have rarely been studied. Thus the objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a multimodal physical exercise program on EF in older people with Parkinson's disease. The EF of the older people was evaluated by neuropsychological testing, and for confounding variables such as attention, depressive symptoms and anxiety, before and after intervention. The 20 participants were assigned into Control (CG) and Trained (TG) Groups. The TG participated in generalized physical training for 6 months. The ANOVA showed a significant interaction (p<.05) that indicated a beneficial contribution of training on EF. No significant interactions were found in the results for confounding variables between groups and pre- and post-intervention, which supports the beneficial findings of physical exercise training on EF.

2 Followers
 · 
34 Reads
  • Source
    • "These biochemical changes can be directly linked to the causes of dementia in PD (Perry et al, 1985). Our study confirms the results of a previous study that also found improved performance of executive functions in healthy elderly and PD patients after 6 months intervention with physical exercise (Tanaka et al., 2009), and indicates that practicing regular exercise can help the system to compensate for the biochemical and physiological deficits from PD, improving some cognitive functions. Aarsland et al. (2010) observed that in patients with mild cognitive impairment in PD, memory impairment was quite common (13.3%), followed by attention and executive ability impairments (10.1%). "
    [Show description] [Hide description]
    DESCRIPTION: This study investigated the effect of a multimodal exercise program on executive functions and memory in people with Parkinson’s disease, taking into account disease severity and gender. Twenty-three patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) were evaluated before and after a 6-month exercise program to improve executive functions and memory. We observed the effects of the intervention on executive functions (ability to abstract: p = .01), immediate memory (p = .04) and declarative episodic memory (p < .001). Women showed higher scores on declarative episodic memory (p = .03) than men, however there was no interaction between gender and the intervention. Regardless of sex and disease severity, these preliminary results indicate that the multimodal exercise seems to be effective in improving cognitive functions in patients with PD, suggesting that this program can be indicated as a preventive strategy to mitigate progressive cognitive deficits in the later stages of the disease.
    Full-text · Research · Feb 2015
  • Source
    • "These biochemical changes can be directly linked to the causes of dementia in PD (Perry et al, 1985). Our study confirms the results of a previous study that also found improved performance of executive functions in healthy elderly and PD patients after 6 months intervention with physical exercise (Tanaka et al., 2009), and indicates that practicing regular exercise can help the system to compensate for the biochemical and physiological deficits from PD, improving some cognitive functions. Aarsland et al. (2010) observed that in patients with mild cognitive impairment in PD, memory impairment was quite common (13.3%), followed by attention and executive ability impairments (10.1%). "
    [Show description] [Hide description]
    DESCRIPTION: This study investigated the effect of a multimodal exercise program on executive functions and memory in people with Parkinson’s disease, taking into account disease severity and gender. Twenty-three patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) were evaluated before and after a 6-month exercise program to improve executive functions and memory. We observed the effects of the intervention on executive functions (ability to abstract: p = .01), immediate memory (p = .04) and declarative episodic memory (p < .001). Women showed higher scores on declarative episodic memory (p = .03) than men, however there was no interaction between gender and the intervention. Regardless of sex and disease severity, these preliminary results indicate that the multimodal exercise seems to be effective in improving cognitive functions in patients with PD, suggesting that this program can be indicated as a preventive strategy to mitigate progressive cognitive deficits in the later stages of the disease.
    Full-text · Research · Feb 2015
  • Source
    • "These biochemical changes can be directly linked to the causes of dementia in PD (Perry et al, 1985). Our study confirms the results of a previous study that also found improved performance of executive functions in healthy elderly and PD patients after 6 months intervention with physical exercise (Tanaka et al., 2009), and indicates that practicing regular exercise can help the system to compensate for the biochemical and physiological deficits from PD, improving some cognitive functions. Aarsland et al. (2010) observed that in patients with mild cognitive impairment in PD, memory impairment was quite common (13.3%), followed by attention and executive ability impairments (10.1%). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the effect of a multimodal exercise program on executive functions and memory in people with Parkinson's disease, taking into account disease severity and gender. Twenty-three patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) were evaluated before and after a 6-month exercise program to improve executive functions and memory. We observed the effects of the intervention on executive functions (ability to abstract: p = .01), immediate memory (p = .04) and declarative episodic memory (p < 001). Women showed higher scores on declarative episodic memory (p = .03) than men, however there was no interaction between gender and the intervention. Regardless of sex and disease severity, these preliminary results indicate that the multimodal exercise seems to be effective in improving cognitive functions in patients with PD, suggesting that this program can be indicated as a preventive strategy to mitigate progressive cognitive deficits in the later stages of the disease.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Motriz. Revista de Educação Física
Show more