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Abstract

Every student and educator needs a trusted person to ask provocative questions and offer helpful critiques. A critical friend understands the context of the work presented and the person or group's desired outcomes. Critical friendships begin through building trust; critical friends must listen well, offer value judgments on the learner's request, respond honestly, and promote the work's success. (MLH)
... As I collaborated with teachers, I positioned myself as a critical friend. Costa and Kallick (1993) define a critical friend as one who: ...
... Some teachers also collaborated with Lisa, the school's new administrator focused on language learning, on incorporating translanguaging pedagogies during my research study, as part of her push to move toward an integrated bilingual program model. Throughout my research study, I acted as a critical friend (Costa & Kallick, 1993) as teachers designed, implemented, reflected on, and redesigned translanguaging pedagogies. ...
Thesis
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The promotion of language ideologies, policies and pedagogies that treat languages as separate and hierarchical has become a central concern for critical education scholars. In this case study, I explore how school actors at Colegio Colombiano (CC), an international school in Colombia, engaged with critical approaches to bi/multilingual education to leverage the fluid identities and languaging practices of plurilingual teachers and students. In my first data chapter, I place CC within its larger educational context by showing how a logic of coloniality informs both public and private K-12 foreign language education in Colombia. This logic of coloniality reflects a hierarchy of actors within the field of foreign language education in Colombia with external international organizations holding significant power and influence over local priorities. I build on these findings to call international schools into current conversations about decolonizing language education in Colombia. In my second data chapter, I consider how school actors’ language ideologies impacted the creation and enactment of language policies at CC. I describe a spectrum to show how faculty demonstrated a significant shift away from hegemonic ideologies and oppressive language policies through an increasing recognition of the importance of Spanish. While explicit messages about English as superior were no longer officially promoted at CC, colonialistic ideologies and policies persisted which valorized English, denigrated Spanish, and completely ignored other societal and home languages. In my final data chapter, I explore how teachers and students engaged with translanguaging pedagogies. While many teachers expressed a desire to leverage their and their students’ plurilingual repertoires they felt limited by significant obstacles, including the school’s strict model of language separation. Elementary students generally demonstrated a willingness to engage with translanguaging pedagogies, while older students expressed a complex resistance as they negotiated their bilingual identities. In my concluding chapter, I return to the identified logic of coloniality to discuss how international school communities can unveil and interrogate colonialistic understandings of languages, language users and languaging practices. I propose the Decolonizing International Multilingual Education (DIME) framework as a tool to guide schools in the work of decolonizing their language programs.
... The last author (Ramón) acted as a critical friend. Ramón had engaged with YPAR, youth football and migration studies for many years and helped Carla to reflect on, explore, and clarify the values and beliefs she brought to her research (Carr & Kemmis, 1986;Costa & Kallick, 1993). ...
Article
Critical scholarship in sport for development (SfD) advocates transformative research to disrupt the historical colonising view of sport as a vehicle to acculturate people into the values and norms of dominant Western culture. Youth participatory action research (YPAR) involves youth throughout the research process and consequently has the potential to challenge hegemonic forms of knowledge production in SfD. In reality, however, authentic engagement of co-researchers in the research process is often largely confined to data collection. This article draws on the decolonising lens as a theoretical framework to examine tensions, possibilities, and power relations that researchers and co-researchers encounter when co-designing and implementing YPAR in SfD. The project comprised a sixteen-week YPAR in a community-based football programme in Melbourne, Australia. Data collection comprised weekly collaborative meetings, observations collected as field notes, artefacts produced by participants, interviews, and reflective meetings. Findings centred on three themes: (a) finding sensitive ways to navigate the tensions of building trust and rapport; (b) negotiating the struggle between the co-researchers and the coaches about the use of space within the sport context; and (c) the challenges of relinquishing power in research and knowledge production, as reflected in our collective struggle to communicate to participants the value of YPAR for themselves and their communities. The findings challenge a romantic view that YPAR is guaranteed to be an empowering experience for young people; instead, they foreground the complexities and messiness of the process of sharing power with co-researchers in SfD. We conclude by advocating for critical, reflexive YPAR with explicit social transformation objectives to work toward the co-production of knowledge with young people.
... This resulted in a relatively close connection to the actors involved in experimental projects within the City of Stockholm, which allowed me to learn about the city strategies and to get to know actors less formally. However, I did not work as a reflexive practitioner or as an action researcher; rather, I served as a critical friend that could be trusted and that understood the context, but I still had the ability to ask challenging questions to contribute to further reflections and development of the work (Costa & Kallick, 1993). In short, I participated as an insider/outsider within the innovation platform. ...
Thesis
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Contemporary planning and governance of cities involves practices of experiments and trials in urban experiments, collaborative platforms, and urban development projects with high ambitions for sustainability and innovative solutions. The introduction of experimental governance establishes a new logic of public administration that results in multiple opportunities and challenges. This thesis aims to examine the municipalities’ organisational capacity for experimental governance and the opportunities to ensure legitimacy. The thesis involves a case study of the City of Stockholm and its innovative practices in general and experimental governance practices in particular. The focus is on the municipal organisation and how it has developed over the past decade, rather than single experiments, collaborations, and projects. Using a qualitative research approach, empirical data was collected through semi-structured interviews, participatory observations, and document studies. The thesis comprises four research articles. The first article provides a discussion of municipal innovation approaches and their influence of institutional logics. The second article is about municipal functions related to experiments, and how these functions challenge the local government. The third article examines the work of experiments and partnerships in policy and practice from a legitimacy perspective. The fourth article explores the institutional capacity for translating innovation actions from high-profile urban development projects into regular processes of the municipality. The findings point towards the need for a more nuanced understanding of practices of experimental governance, and the development of permanent organisational structures and cultures to support and steer these practices. There is also a need for organisational procedures to ensure legitimacy, related to both input in terms of transparency, accountability and equality, and output in terms of results and effectiveness, with a capacity to implement the results.
... Performing self-study is a collaborative activity in which the researchers (the three authors) acted as critical friends to each other. The aim was to create an intellectually safe and supportive community in which each researcher sought to improve their practice through critical collaborative inquiry (COSTA; KALLICK, 1993;SAMARAS, 2011). It involved a willingness to open one's practice to critique and becoming mutually vulnerable (RICHARDS; RESSLER, 2016). ...
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This paper reports on the first phase of a three-year project in which we explored ways to adapt and evolve our pedagogies in relation to the use of new and emerging digital technologies. Our aim is to develop a shared understanding and resourcefulness for teaching in an age where pedagogy in a university setting is an increasingly complex and novel problem. We focus specifically on our experiences of emergency remote teaching (ERT) where we pivoted mid semester from on-campus classroom-based teaching to exclusively online delivery and assessment. Through a dialogical approach enabled by the self-study, we support each other, describe the key challenges we have experienced, and identify the key assumptions that underpin our practices as teachers in digital learning contexts. The themes found in this dialectical relationship were named as: the visibility of students, the constraints of technology, and the fact that we are neophyte lecturers again.
Chapter
Educators have the best job in the world. They have the responsibility of helping others find their purpose in life. Every profession there is depends on them. Why is it that people with the greatest responsibility tend to not make time to care for themselves? We have often heard you cannot pour from an empty cup. In order for you to be effective and make a difference in the lives of others, you must be certain you are up for the task. The responsibility of helping others achieve their goals sometimes means putting yours on the back burner. This can lead to burnout. Educators must be better to themselves so they can be good to their students.
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Situated in the unprecedented realities of life, the present autoethnographic account is an organic manifestation of how a language teacher (the first author) navigated diverse roles in transition to online education in a dialectic and dialogic manner with another teacher (the second author) in the pandemic period. The sudden and complete shift accompanied by health threats and a number of complexities in the new normal brought about uniquely stressful and demanding conditions in the lives of the teachers.Being in such a delicate position in educational activities, teachers’ views, practices as well as identities were not immune to these changes. Considering that identity is being constantly moulded by lived experiences, deconstruction of the existing identity in order to grow into another seems to be an important niche to be addressed in current studies particularly in such turmoil. For this reason, the present autoethnographical study aimed to uncover how a language teacher at a higher education context grew into another self with emergency remote teaching and online education practices. The data relying on self-observational, reflective and external tools revealed three stages in the identity (de-co-re-)construction of the participant: where the researcher felt the shock, where she tried to find a way out and where she found the synergy among diverse selves. The implications regarding teacher identity, well-being and sociocultural foundations of (online) teaching are also discussed in the study.
Chapter
Chapter 7 presents the journeys of the researchers. The chapter draws on diverse data sources to document the realities and complexities of the intersecting processes of collaboration and independent inquiry that the project was designed to foster from its inception. These data sources include project documents, audio-recordings and transcriptions of meetings, email archives and notes on discussions involving different members of the group, as well as the data gleaned directly from the researchers’ work with the teacher partners as documented in previous chapters.
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Multilingual refugee-background youth (RBY) in U.S. schools are often faced with the challenge of learning English, as the language of instruction, alongside content. Given that, in both formal and informal educa- tional settings, content is usually text-based, teachers need to know how to facilitate multilingual RBY’s meaning-making with a wide range of texts. To explore how teachers can leverage RBY’s backgrounds and support their meaning-making and negotiation of written and multimodal texts, this self-study ex- amined the first author’s instructional practices and decision-making in a Reading Lab designed for RBY in a community-based summer camp. Collaborative inquiry and analyses yielded findings that illustrate the teacher’s linguistic orientation to meaning-making, which centers the role of language and the learn- ers themselves in dialogic engagement with texts.
Article
Zusammenfassung Dieser Beitrag legt den Schwerpunkt auf den Aufbau und die Auffindbarkeit von ausgewählten Webformularen im Hinblick auf die Praktikabilität der kooperativen bibliothekarischen Auskunftstätigkeit. In Form einer Vorstudie werden die Formulare des schweizerischen SwissInfoDesk und der deutschen DigiAuskunft verglichen. Es zeigt sich, dass Webformulare in ihrer orts- und zeitunabhängigen Form auch im Rahmen einer Verbundsdienstleistung durchaus praktikabel sein können.
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