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Organizational Climate and Student Achievement: A Parsimonious and Longitudinal View

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Abstract

Health and openness metaphors are used to develop measures of organizational climate. In addition to socioeconomic status, Environmental Press, Collegial Leadership, Teacher Professionalism, and Academic Press are aspects of climate that make significant, independent contributions to student achievement in basic skills and explain a substantial amount of the variance. Moreover, the influence of school climate on achievement is enduring over several years. The proposed climate framework underscores important linkages between the institutional, managerial, technical, and client levels in service organizations such as schools.
... Moreover, the hypothesis H5 is also accepted that shows the positive and significant relationship between transformational leadership and their factors namely idealized behavior, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individual attributes with teacher quality. The empirical evidence facilitated significant influence of transformational leadership on teacher quality (Dionne et al., 2004;Hoy et al., 1998;Pootrakul, 2014;Wang, 2004). The H6 hypothesis of this study is also accepted that shows the positive and significant relationship with transformational leadership and their factors idealized behavior, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individual attributes on engineering education quality. ...
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Globally, there is need to develop the education system for enhancing the economic growth by developing the students. Now, the education system becomes the business for stake holders that affect the education quality. The education quality provide the vision for students for getting better jobs, managerial positions in the organization, enhancement in leading qualities. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of transformational leadership on engineering education quality. The current study also examines the mediating role of teacher's quality, and how teacher's quality mediates the relationship of transformational leadership and engineering education quality. This study shows the engineering education quality of Indonesian students. Engineering education quality can be determined by the factors of transformational leadership. GAT (General aptitude test) is one of the factor of engineering education quality that is implemented by national testing service (Public institution) and are deliberated as the most trustworthy and identical assessments in the nation to measure student academic know-how. Under this study, quantitative analysis is perform and collecting data from fresh undergraduates students. The data is collected through administrated survey questionnaire, it is more appropriate method in this study because it will give factual data on numerical figure bases that can be evaluate easily and that is free from any type of the ambiguities. The simple random sampling technique is used under this study for selecting the sample from large population. By using simple random sampling technique the questionnaire is distributed among 250 college fresh undergraduates' students. From 250 questionnaires 200 questionnaires received back from students. The nature of the study is cross sectional only one time data is collected from students. This study used the Smart PLS software for analyzing the relationship among variables such as transformational leadership, engineering education quality and teacher's quality. The findings of the study reveals that transformational leadership and its factors such as idealized behavior, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individual attributes has significant and positive relationship with engineering education quality. It can be improved by providing best leadership characteristics like transformational leadership. The finding also reveals that teacher's quality has significant and positive relationship with transformational leadership and engineering education quality.
... Peer support creates a network of multiple opportunities of professional learning among teachers and tents to increase the efficiency of teachers' activities Fulton et al. (2005) Wei et al. (2009) Hoy et al. (1998 argue that getting support from peers, teachers are ready to bear greater responsibilities, make more efforts to improve their practices, and show more interest in professional development activities. Researchers Harwell et al. (2001) Bryant et al. (2001) also suggest combining the expertise of researchers in professional learning of teachers to make it more conducive and collaborative. ...
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It is often believed that ‘teacher professional development’ is propagated, researched and implemented by western researchers in 19th century. Contrary to these beliefs, a study of ancient Indian text Upanishads (c.800 BCE - c.500 BCE) reveal that teacher professional development practices were a part and parcel of ancient Indian education system. Present research traces a number of evidences from three Upanishads namely Chhandogya Upanishad, Prasna Upanishad, and Taittiriya Upanishad to prove that a majority of modern day teacher professional development practices were prevalent in ancient India and rishis and munis (teachers in an ancient India) were apt practitioners and beneficiaries of these practices.
... Generally, the learning process can be sustained by a positive and respectful atmosphere (Harris and Chrispeels 2006; Kyriakides and Creemers 2008). Moreover, some longitudinal studies (Hoy et al. 1998) have confirmed that a positive school climate not only contributes to immediate student achievement but also to effects that seem to persist for years. ...
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Educational researchers have increasingly recognised the importance of school climate as a malleable factor for improving academic performance. In this perspective, we exploit the data collected by the Italian Institute for the Evaluation of the Education System (INVALSI) to assess the effect of some school climate related factors on academic performance of tenth-grade Italian students. A Multilevel Bayesian Structural Equation Model (MBSEM) is adopted to highlight the effect of some relevant dimensions of school climate (students’ disciplinary behaviour and parents’ involvement) on academic performance and their role on the relationships between student socioeconomic status and achievement. The main findings show that disciplinary behaviour, on the one hand, directly influences the level of competence of the students, and, on the other hand, it partly mediates the effect of socioeconomic background whereas parents’ involvement does not appear to exert any significant effect on students’ performance.
... Os estudos conduzidos em ambientes de aprendizagem baseiam-se em trabalhos anteriores relacionados ao clima organizacional e sua aplicação em ambientes educacionais (Zandvliet e Broekhuizen, 2017). A influência do clima da instituição de ensino sobre o aproveitamento dos alunos é algo que perdura ao longo dos anos, através de ligações importantes entre os níveis institucional, administrativo, técnico e de usuário consumidor em organizações de serviços, tais como as instituições de ensino (Hoy et al., 1998). ...
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Com a emergência da pandemia de COVID-19 as atividades de ensino e de aprendizagem, assim como os ambientes de aprendizagem da pós-graduação, sofreram modificações. A principal delas foi a transferência do ensino presencial para aulas no formato remoto, ação esta que não foi acompanhada por condizente reflexão acerca de como isso reflete no aprendizado por parte dos estudantes. Assim, o objetivo do estudo foi analisar a percepção dos alunos da pós-graduação quanto a aprendizagem em função dos ambientes de aprendizagem vivenciados durante o distanciamento social decorrente da pandemia de COVID-19. A pesquisa adotou uma abordagem quantitativa de cunho descritivo, tendo sido realizada através de um levantamento com 734 estudantes de pós-graduação stricto sensu de diversos cursos a nível nacional, durante fevereiro de 2021. O questionário abordou 21 variáveis que se aglutinavam em quatro ambientes de aprendizagem: físico; psicossocial; pedagógico; e tecnológico. Através da análise de agrupamentos, identificou-se cinco grupos distintos: estudantes com alta aprendizagem e bom aproveitamento dos ambientes de aprendizagem; estudantes com nível mediano de aprendizagem; estudantes com bom nível de aprendizagem e dificuldades no ambiente físico; estudantes com baixo nível de aprendizagem; e estudantes com dificuldades de aprendizagem e baixo aproveitamento dos ambientes de aprendizagem. Os resultados mostraram que grande parte dos alunos da pós-graduação no Brasil conseguiram se adaptar bem diante do cenário pandêmico e ter aprendizados satisfatórios.
... School climate is reflected by the staff's perceptions of their relationships or of the workplace environment, as well as by characteristics of the student body (Hoagwood & Johnson, 2003;Owens, 2004). Staff reports of schools' overall organizational health have been linked with greater efficacy, commitment, and job satisfaction, as well as with positive outcomes for students (Hoy, Hannum, & Tschannen-Moran, 1998). Constructs such as openness in communication, orientation to change (Kallestad & Olweus, 2003), and an open and supportive environment (Parcel et al., 2003) have been positively related to measures of implementation quality. ...
... L'organisation interne de l'établissement exerce une influence sur la qualité du climat scolaire, les résultats des études sont encore une fois clairs sur ce sujet [HOY, 1997[HOY, , 1998]. Le fonctionnement d'un établissement se caractérise par les différents dispositifs mis en place, mais aussi par les relations maintenues dans cet espace. ...
... In a school working environment, the school climate is a relatively enduring quality throughout the school, which describes the participants' collective perception of daily behavior and influences their attitudes and behavior in school (Townley, 1991). Research shows that creating a positive, open climate has many benefits, including improved student achievement (Hoy et al., 1998), and ratings of school effectiveness (Townley, 1991). Seibert and Kraimer (2001) believe that employees with proactive personality tend to have more innovative thinking and innovation ability at work. ...
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Objective : This study, aims to explore the relationship of error management climate and self-efficacy between preschool teachers’ proactive personality and innovative behavior. Methods : Four hundred thirty-nine preschool teachers were tested by proactive personality scale, error management climate scale, general self-efficacy scale, and employee innovation behavior scale. Results : Preschool teachers’ proactive personality can directly predict their innovative behaviors, has a significant indirect effect on innovative behaviors through error management climate, and has a significant indirect effect on innovative behaviors through self-efficacy. Error management climate and self-efficacy play a chain-mediated role in the relationship between preschool teachers’ proactive personality and innovative behavior. Conclusion : Error management climate and self-efficacy play a chain-mediated role in the relationship between preschool teachers’ proactive personality and innovative behavior.
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This study aimed to adapt the School Mindfulness Scale (M-Scale), developed by Hoy, Gage and Tarter (2004), into Turkish culture. A total of 215 teachers from 17 primary and middle schools located in Ankara participated in the study. First, some statistical assumptions were checked in the M-Scale data set, then validity and reliability studies were conducted. The construct validity of the scale was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA model validated the two-factor construct of the M-Scale. Within the reliability and item-analysis measures, item-total correlations, split-half test reliability, Cronbach’s alpha, Guttman lambda, stratified alpha, Armor’s theta, McDonald’s omega coefficients were calculated, and upper 27%-lower 27% group mean differences were examined by independent groups t test. The M-Scale was found to have a moderate level of item discrimination among its 14 items. The Crobach’s alpha value was calculated to be .88 for the overall M-Scale, .83 for the teacher mindfulness factor, and .78 for the principal mindfulness factor. The construct validation and reliability analyses indicated that the M-Scale appears to have adequate psychometric properties, and a valid and reliable data collection tool in measuring school mindfulness construct within Turkish culture.
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This study, inspired by the conceptual framework adapted into school settings by Hoy, investigated teacher and school level factors predicting school mindfulness, and employed an explanatory sequential mixed-methods design. Quantitative data came from 1354 teachers nested in 69 middle schools in Ankara. The role of teacher (gender, age, level of education, length of time with principal, years of experience in school, total years of experience in teaching, number of days attended professional development activities) and school level factors (school size, mode of schooling, class size, organizational trust, collective teacher efficacy, academic press) on the school mindfulness variation within and between schools was explored by HLM. Results revealed that 12,7% of the total variance in school mindfulness originates from between school variations, length of time with principal is a significant yet negative predictor at teacher level, and teacher trust in principal, teacher trust in colleagues and collective efficacy in student discipline are significant predictors at school level. All significant teacher and school level predictors explain 96.9% of the between school variation in school mindfulness. In the second phase, an embedded single case design was adopted, and 12 semi-structured interviews were made with school principals, who scored the highest and the lowest in principal mindfulness subscale of the M-Scale, based on teachers' responses within the former phase. Qualitative data was analyzed by theoretical thematic analysis method. For triangulation, unstructured observations and school websites were also analyzed. This study concludes that trust, dynamic collaboration and mutual communication in schools enhance mindfulness by increasing the capacity for problem-solving, sharing decision-making and learning together.
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Organizational climate influences to a great extent the performance of teachers in school. It is important to know the shared perceptions and psychological conditions of teachers on workplace activities. This study utilized the descriptive method which is a quantitative research method that attempts to collect quantifiable information and presented facts concerning the degree of occurrence of identified institutional climate in select public elementary schools in Cebu City. Using the Organizational Climate Index (OCI) authored by Hoy, Smith and Sweetland (2002), it was found out that the 86 public elementary school teachers coming from Malubog Integrated School, Adlaon Integrated School, Sibugay Integrated School, Sirao Integrated School, and Alaska Elementary School, have high regard to their schools’ climate in terms of institutional vulnerability, collegial leadership, professional teacher behavior, and achievement press. The researchers concluded that organizational climate of trust which involves great relationships with teachers and staff contributes to the affective commitment of teachers and improves their perception on organizational performance, principals and school head. School heads should be openly communicating with their teachers, subordinates, and other big or small employees like secretaries, messengers, and helpers in schools to ensure that these people will continuously receive feedback and support when needed. It is important that they feel valued. With this positive climate, schools’ work environment will improve and warmth and cooperation will be felt by many.
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Researchers and reformers have suggested that school climate is an important aspect of effective schools; however, the notion of climate is defined in a myriad of ways, is frequently nebulous, and is often merely a slogan for better schools. The current analysis uses a health metaphor to conceptualize and measure important aspects of school climate and then examines relationships between school health and student achievement in reading, writing, and mathematics in a sample of middle schools. As predicted, dimensions of organizational health were significantly related to student achievement even when the socioeconomic status of the school was controlled.
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Principals can influence instruction by working through the linkages that govern teacher behavior. What these linkages are, how they affect instruction, and the impact of the principal on them are the focus of this article. Two kinds of linkages are distinguished: bureaucratic and cultural. Past research has attended extensively to bureaucratic linkages without analyzing cultural linkages. It is argued that the principals have access to weak linkages of both kinds. The task for the principal is to consistently employ the full range of linkages through a multitude of major and minoractions to generate a common purpose and effect in the school.
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Important aspects of faculty trust and school climate are identified and examined in this empirical study of middle schools. In general, openness in interpersonal relationships promotes trust among teachers, and interpersonal trust seems to foster openness in organizational relationships. The openness-trust relationship, however, is more complex than it seems at first blush, and the results of this research explain some of the subtleties of the relationship and suggest some strategies for developing a culture of trust in middle schools.
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This study is concerned with the relationship between Halpin and Croft's organizational climates as classified by the Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire and Likert and Likert's organizational systems as classified by the teacher form of the Profile of a School Questionnaire. The positively significant relationship found between these two instruments supports the concept that the two models from which these instruments were developed are comparable.
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The present study investigates the relationships among a variety of school-level climate variables and mean school achievement in a random, sample of Michigan elementary schools. School-level SES, racial composition and climate were each highly related to mean school achievement; only a small proportion of the between-school variance in achievement is explained by SES and racial composition after the effect of school climate is removed. The climate variable we have called Student Sense of Academic Futility had the largest correlation with achievement. An observational study of four schools with similar SES and racial composition but different achievement tended to support the more analytical findings and suggest the processes by which climate affects achievement.
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In his study of Canadian schools (mean teacher size 25) Andrews concluded that the use of the OCDQ is valid in both elementary and secondary schools. In this study of 36 large Illinois high schools (mean teacher size 93) Carver and Sergiovanni reveal that 72% of the schools were classified as having a closed climate. No school was placed on the open half of the climate continuum. This distribution differs greatly from that of the original Halpin and Croft study but is more in accord with the results of Watkins' study of nine secondary schools (mean teacher size 52). Carver and Sergiovanni conclude that the OCDQ is unsuited for use in large secondary schools (mean teacher size more than 25–30). With some modifications the instrument might reflect climate in large secondary schools with department chairmen as respondents.