Article

Social Determinants of Black-White Disparities in Breast Cancer Mortality: A Review

Department of Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Medicine, Florida State University, 1115 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300, USA.
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention (Impact Factor: 4.13). 12/2008; 17(11):2913-23. DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0633
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Despite the recent decline in breast cancer mortality, African American women continue to die from breast cancer at higher rates than do White women. Beyond the fact that breast cancer tends to be a more biologically aggressive disease in African American than in White women, this disparity in breast cancer mortality also reflects social barriers that disproportionately affect African American women. These barriers hinder cancer prevention and control efforts and modify the biological expression of disease. The present review focuses on delineating social, economic, and cultural factors that are potentially responsible for Black-White disparities in breast cancer mortality. This review was guided by the social determinants of health disparities model, a model that identifies barriers associated with poverty, culture, and social injustice as major causes of health disparities. These barriers, in concert with genetic, biological, and environmental factors, can promote differential outcomes for African American and White women along the entire breast cancer continuum, from screening and early detection to treatment and survival. Barriers related to poverty include lack of a primary care physician, inadequate health insurance, and poor access to health care. Barriers related to culture include perceived invulnerability, folk beliefs, and a general mistrust of the health care system. Barriers related to social injustice include racial profiling and discrimination. Many of these barriers are potentially modifiable. Thus, in addition to biomedical advancements, future efforts to reduce disparities in breast cancer mortality should address social barriers that perpetuate disparities among African American and White women in the United States.

    • "Non-Hispanic white women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, but African American women are more likely to die from the cancer (Hunt et al. 2014). Increased mortality rates among African American women may be related to nonbiologic factors including lifestyle behaviors, socioeconomic status, access to quality care, and cultural beliefs (Gerend and Pai 2008; Sheppard et al. 2011). Specific reasons include decreased mammography screening, poor follow-up with providers, and difficulty in adhering to treatment (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012). "
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer fatalism may impact outcomes, particularly for African American (AA) women with breast cancer (BrCa). We examined the psychometrics of the modified Powe Fatalism Inventory in sample of AA women with BrCa from two studies. Only the predetermination and God's will items satisfy the conditions to be classified as a strong subscale. Our analysis identified that five items had strong psychometric properties for measuring fatalism for AA women with BrCa. However, these items do not include all the defining attributes of fatalism. A strong measure of fatalism strengthens our understanding of how this concept influences AA patient outcomes.
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    • "Non-Hispanic white women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, but African American women are more likely to die from the cancer (Hunt et al. 2014). Increased mortality rates among African American women may be related to nonbiologic factors including lifestyle behaviors, socioeconomic status, access to quality care, and cultural beliefs (Gerend and Pai 2008; Sheppard et al. 2011). Specific reasons include decreased mammography screening, poor follow-up with providers, and difficulty in adhering to treatment (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012). "

    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Religion and Health
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    • "Neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation was related to increased and extended time to resolution (TTR) following an abnormal breast cancer screening (Plascak et al., 2014). Zenk, Tarlov, & Sun (2006, proposed that places with less economic endowments are associated with decreased chances of participating in breast cancer screening and increased risk of late-stage breast cancer diagnosis.Akinyemiju (2012)suggested that women who live in the cities and are classified as middle socioeconomic status households are less likely to receive mammography than women belonging to middle socioeconomic status households in rural ar- eas.Gerend & Pai (2008)recognized that women living in disadvantaged and economically deprived areas, such as the Riverine areas of the Niger-Delta region in Nigeria, could be made to travel long distances and may have to endure long waiting times in order to be seen for breast cancer screening. "

    Full-text · Article · May 2015
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