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Proactive Strategies to Safeguard Young Adolescents in the Cyberage

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Abstract

Schools should be proactive rather than reactive to issues of technology safety, and this requires careful planning and policy implementation. In this article, the authors provide information and recommendations that will help middle grades educators, students, and parents to safely and successfully manage the many technologies they encounter and use daily, and to understand and combat the threats they may pose. Middle schools must develop ways to mitigate the dangers of technologies without denying students opportunities to use them, for the benefits of technology far outweigh the risks.

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