Article

[Safety of solifenacin and tolterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder: a meta-analysis.]

Department of Urology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012, China.
Zhonghua yi xue za zhi 12/2012; 92(48):3398-3402. DOI: 10.3760/cma.j.issn.0376-2491.2012.48.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective:
To evaluate the safety of solifenacin and tolterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB).

Methods:
Studies on the solifenacin, tolterodine and OAB were searched and those fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected. RevMan 5.0 software was used to perform meta-analysis. Three studies were included with an overall sample size of 1013 cases. The experimental group of solifenacin contained 517 cases while the control group had 496 cases.

Results:
The incidence rates of overall adverse event, dry mouth, constipation and blurred vision of the experimental group (solifenacin 5 mg once per day) was 26.69% (138/517), 10.64% (55/517), 5.42% (28/517) and 6.55% (26/397) while those of the control group (tolterodine 2 mg twice per day) 33.27% (165/496), 16.73% (83/496), 2.22% (11/496) and 4.20% (16/381) respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in overall adverse event (RR = 0.76, 95%CI: 0.52 - 1.12, P = 0.170) and blurred vision (RR = 1.59, 95%CI: 0.88 - 2.90, P = 0.130) between two groups. However, the incidence rate of key antimuscarinic adverse events such as dry mouth (RR = 0.63, 95%CI: 0.46 - 0.87, P = 0.005) and constipation (RR = 2.38, 95%CI: 1.21 - 4.66, P = 0.010) showed statistically significant difference.

Conclusions:
Dry mouth is the most common adverse event of solifenacin (5 mg once per day) and tolterodine (2 mg twice per day). Solifenacin has a lower incidence rate of dry mouth and a higher rate of constipation than tolterodine. A clinical physician should consider the incidence of adverse events during treating OAB, especially for those patients prone to constipation.

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