The Biological Effect of Dentin Noncollagenous Proteins (DNCPs) on the Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (HPDLSCs) In Vitro and In Vivo

ArticleinTissue Engineering Part A 14(12):2059-68 · November 2008with13 Reads
Impact Factor: 4.70 · DOI: 10.1089/ten.tea.2008.0021 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    It was recognized that periodontal progenitor cells penetrate disintegrated Hertwig's epithelial root sheath, and contact with root dentin give rise to periodontium formation. Clinically, direct contact of the conditioned or denuded root surfaces with periodontal cells seems to be a prerequisite for periodontal regeneration. In this study, we investigated the biological effect of dentin noncollagenous proteins (DNCPs) on the human periodontal ligament stem cells (HPDLSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Chemical-conditioned root dentin (CCRD) was prepared by process of partly demineralization and deproteinization. Treated HPDLSCs with DNCPs showed increased proliferation and adhesion ability. Induced HPDLSCs presented several features of cementoblast differentiation, as indicated by morphologic changes, enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, increased matrix mineralization, and upregulated expression of mineralization-associated genes. Incubation of treated HPDLSC aggregate in vivo revealed that cementum-like tissues formed along the CCRD surface with fibrous tissue adjacent to or inserted into it, but untreated HPDLSCs cannot form similar structure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply active proteins derived from dentin with periodontal stem cells to construct periodontal structure, which may shed light on human periodontal tissue regeneration.