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Motivating the Demotivated Classroom: Gaming as a Motivational Medium for Students with Intellectual Disability and their Educators

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Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the usage of serious games as a motivational medium at the educational experience of users with intellectual disabilities on one hand, and their educator on the other.Digital games have been reported to stimulate the students’ interest, while motivating them to deploy control, curiosity, and imagination (Malone, 1981). Many studies suggested the use of digital games as an educational medium, and proved that digital games can enhance motivation and learning since the user is more than willing to test his/her knowledge, apply them while gaming and learn and assimilate new information while playing and having fun (Malone, 1980). The question addressed in this chapter is whether or not digital games are able to engage the Special Educational Needs (SEN) classroom both in terms of students with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) and their educator.Findings from the educational literature and experimental observations, as well as case studies from field studies will be presented and discussed, in order to demonstrate how games are able to constitute a powerful educational and motivational medium in a SEN classroom.

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