Article

Appropriateness Criteria and Elective Procedures - Total Joint Arthroplasty

Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 55.87). 12/2012; 367(26):2467-9. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1209998
Source: PubMed
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Available from: Alvin I Mushlin, Feb 28, 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Anterior knee pain remains common following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of patellar decompression via drilling for the treatment of anterior knee pain following TKA without patellar resurfacing. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed in 271 consecutive patients who underwent primary total knee replacement with patellar decompression (study group, n = 131) or without decompression (control group, n = 140). The patients were assessed according to the Knee Society rating, clinical anterior knee pain score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient-satisfaction score in each group. Each assessment was performed without the examiner knowing whether the patella had been decompressed. Radiographic evaluations were also performed according to the Knee Society scoring system for functional activity and our own severity grade system for patellofemoral articular change. Results: There were no adverse events following patellar decompression. The overall prevalence of anterior knee pain was not significantly different between groups (p = 0.71). However, patients presenting pain over grade II after the operation in the study group were statistically low (p = 0.01). The overall postoperative knee scores were higher in the study group, but there were no significant differences between groups (p = 0.0731). Analyses of the radiographs revealed similar postoperative outcomes in both groups of knees. Conclusions: As we observed significantly lower rates of anterior knee pain and no patellar complications following patellar decompression via drilling in TKA without patellar resurfacing, we recommend performing patellar decompression in cases of total knee replacement without patellar resurfacing.
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    ABSTRACT: Readmission has been cited as an important quality measure in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. We queried an electronic database for all patients who underwent Total Hip Arthroplasty or Total Knee Arthroplasty at our institution from 2006 to 2010 and identified those readmitted within 90days of surgery, reviewed their demographic and clinical data, and performed a multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine significant risk factors. The overall 90-day readmission rate was 7.8%. The most common readmission diagnoses were related to infection and procedure-related complications. An increased likelihood of readmission was found with coronary artery disease, diabetes, increased LOS, underweight status, obese status, age (over 80 or under 50), and Medicare. Procedure-related complications and wound complications accounted for more readmissions than any single medical complication.
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