Article

Allergy to quail's egg without allergy to chicken's egg. Case report

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Abstract

We present a case of quail's egg allergy without allergy to chicken's egg. Girl of 10.5 years old who presents anaphylactic reaction after she ate an uncooked quail's egg. She had eaten boiled quail's egg before. She eats chicken's eggs without clinical symptoms. We made a prick to chicken's egg and prick-by-prick to uncooked quail's and raw chicken's egg. We determined specific IgE to chicken's egg; electrophoresis and IgE by immunoblot to eggs from chicken, duck, goose, and quail. We obtained negative results to prick, prick-by-prick and specific IgE to chicken's egg. Prick-by-prick to quail's egg was positive. By immunoblot we recognised a protein in quail's egg white, which is ovotransferrin without any similar bands in other species' eggs. The protein that we recognised is a specific protein of quail's egg. These proteins did not cross-react with proteins of chicken's egg. Cooking may degrade such proteins.

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... Our patient revealed allergic manifestations following skin exposure to quail egg, but the cases presented in the studies of Caro Contreras et al and Micozzi et al showed allergic reactions after oral intake of the quail egg. 4,5 On the other hand, Jones et al reported this case as an occupational allergy. 6 They found two egg workers (a research scientist and a laboratory technician) with allergic symptoms and IgE sensitization to hen's egg and quail's egg. ...
... 9 Moreover, the immunomodulatory and anti-allergic functions of quail' egg have been already patented (patent number: US2015/0057232A1). 10 Despite the aforementioned issues, a few cases of allergy to quail eggs have been found in the literature. [4][5][6] According to the published studies, cross-reactivity has been identified among molecules of egg whites in different birds. Also, the phylogenic distance among species of birds has the potential to affect the diversity of cross-reactivity. ...
... Also, the phylogenic distance among species of birds has the potential to affect the diversity of cross-reactivity. 4 The presence of genuine and non-cross reacting proteins in quail's egg could be the reason for allergy to quail's egg without allergic reaction to hen's egg white. 4 According to the study of Micozzi et al Ovalbumin of quail's egg was the main allergenic protein in five patients with this history. ...
Article
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Hen’s egg, as one of the most common reasons for IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity, affects both children and adults. Taking precautionary measures is suggested for the consumption of other birds’ eggs for patients with allergy to hen’s egg. This paper describes a rare patient with quail egg allergy, which manifested no allergic reactions after oral food challenge with hen’s egg white
... 27 Cases of quail's egg and duck's egg allergy in the absence of hen's egg allergy have been reported; however, clinically relevant avian egg cross-reactivity has not been systematically investigated. 28,29 GRAINS Relevant allergens in wheat belong to the gliadin or glutenin family. 14 The majority of patients with wheat allergy will have positive allergy testing (SPT and/or wheat sIgE) and some may present with clinical reactions, in particular, to barley. ...
... 27 Cases of quail's egg and duck's egg allergy in the absence of hen's egg allergy have been reported; however, clinically relevant avian egg cross-reactivity has not been systematically investigated. 28,29 GRAINS Relevant allergens in wheat belong to the gliadin or glutenin family. 14 The majority of patients with wheat allergy will have positive allergy testing (SPT and/or wheat sIgE) and some may present with clinical reactions, in particular, to barley. ...
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... 27 Cases of quail's egg and duck's egg allergy in the absence of hen's egg allergy have been reported; however, clinically relevant avian egg cross-reactivity has not been systematically investigated. 28,29 GRAINS Relevant allergens in wheat belong to the gliadin or glutenin family. 14 The majority of patients with wheat allergy will have positive allergy testing (SPT and/or wheat sIgE) and some may present with clinical reactions, in particular, to barley. ...
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Foods can induce adverse reactions by a variety of mechanisms. An understanding of the characteristic signs and symptoms and the related mechanisms of adverse food reactions allows the clinician to efficiently diagnose and treat patients. Adverse reactions to foods can be classified based on whether there is a nonimmunologic or immunologic basis for symptoms. Food intolerance, or a nonimmunologic reaction, includes a range of responses to foods that result primarily from an individual’s intrinsic inability to metabolize a component of the food, e.g. , lactose sugar in dairy products. Other nonimmunologic adverse reactions may be attributed to food toxins or pharmacologic properties pharmacologic properties of foods themselves. Immunologic adverse reactions, in contrast, involve immune responses to food and are termed food allergy. Food allergy may further be categorized based on the underlying immunopathophysiology as immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated, non‐IgE mediated, or cell mediated. Some chronic allergic responses involve a combination of immune mechanisms. This review provides a general classification system for adverse food reactions and describes specific conditions.
... 19 There is one report from quail's egg allergy without HEA in a 10-year-old girl; the author referred to the existence of dissimilar specific proteins in the quail's egg. 20 Sensitization to the duck's egg was seen in 65% of our children; duck is classified as Anseriformes family and duck's protein is almost similar to the hen's protein. 18 Langeland reported that allergenic activity to duck's egg was 0.01 to 0.001 times more in individuals with HEA. 14 Añíbarro reported an adult case with IgE-mediated food allergy to eggs from duck and goose without HEA; he suggested ovalbumin as the culprit protein. ...
Article
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... Bıldırcın yumurtası alerjisi sadece vaka sunularında bildirilmiştir. Tavuk yumurtası ve haşlanmış bıldırcın yumurtasını sorunsuz tüketen, ancak çiğ bıldırcın yumurtası alımı sonrası anafilaksi gelişen on yaşında olgu literatürde vardır (18). Bilinen tavuk yumurtası alerjisi olan atopik dermatitli beş yaşında hastanın pişmiş bıldırcın yumurtasına dokunma sonrası anafilaksi geçirmesi de bildirilmiştir (16). ...
... [15] Caro Contreras reported a case of quail egg allergy without chicken egg allergy, for the interaction of transferrin and IgE in quail eggs was not found in other eggs. [16] Therefore, comparative proteomics of different avian eggs is essential to define the unique protein pattern of each species to ensure food quality and safety. ...
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