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Proceedings institute of zoology

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Proceedings institute of zoology

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163-176 Investigations of the ichthyofauna of Georgia began in the XVIII-XIX centuries , but no faunistic lists of the fish species of the country have been published until now. The present ichthyofauna of Georgia comprises 167 species, belonging to 3 subgenera, 109 genera, 5 tribes, 9 subfamilies, 57 families, 13 suborders, 25 orders, 5 superorders, 2 subclasses, 3 classes and 2 superclasses. Among them 61 are freshwater inhabitants, 76 live in marine water and 30 species are migratory. Terminology follows modern systematic classification and the Global information system on fishes. The following abbreviations are used: BS- Black Sea, BSB- Black Sea Basin, BSE- Black Sea everywhere, BSC– Black Sea Coast, BSCE- Black Sea coast everywhere, BSCC- Black Sea Coast of Caucasus, Riv.- river, Res. - reservoir, L.-lake. 147-153 The scale species complex and parasitoids of urban areas were determined in Georgia, during the years 1994 to 2006. In this study a total of 84 species of coccids are listed belonging to 52 genera and 9 families. 1 species Planacoccus vovae is recorded first time for Georgia and Caucasus. The most numerous family is Diaspididae with 39 species and Coccidae with 22 species.
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