Article

Effect of cinnamon oil on the incidence of anthracnose and postharvest quality of bananas during storage

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Abstract

Colletotrichum musae is the causal organism of anthracnose in bananas during storage. A study using four concentrations of cinnamon oil (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 & 0.4%) along with untreated control was designed to investigate the antifungal effects of this plant product against anthracnose of bananas. The effects of cinnamon oil on quality of bananas during storage at (13±1°C, 80-90 relative humidity) for 28 days were also determined. A significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of mycelial growth and conidial germination of C. musae was observed in all treatments of cinnamon oil as compared to the control after 7 days of incubation at room temperature. However the Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) plates amended with 0.4% cinnamon oil showed the most promising results among all the treatments in suppressing the mycelial growth and conidial germination inhibition (83.2%), while there was no effective conidial germination inhibition found in the control. The cinnamon oil treatments also delayed the disease incidence and maintained quality during storage however, some phytotoxic effects were observed on fruits treated with higher concentration. It can thus be concluded that the concentration up to 0.3% can be used for extending the storage life of bananas for up to 28 days without affecting the physico-chemical properties.

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... Pseudomonas and Bacillus are two mostly used bio-control agents as they have antifungal, plant growth promoting and plant defense inducing activities [14]. The potential of essential oils as an alternative disease control for several fruit crops [29] has been well-studied. To date, a wide range of essential oils such as thyme, Eucalyptus, Mexican lime, lemongrass, cinnamon and castor oil applied on fruits have proven to be effective against C. gloeosporioides and L. theobromae [30,1]. ...
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Anthracnose, caused by the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, is the main post-harvest disease of the papaya. Inactivation of the spores of C. gloeosporioides in saline solution by the use of high hydrostatic pressure, citral oil and lemongrass oil, alone and in combination, was studied. C. gloeosporioides spores were efficiently inhibited after a pressure treatment of 350 MPa for 30 min. When C. gloeosporioides was treated with 0.75 mg ml(-1) of citral or lemongrass oil, the pressure needed to achieve the same spore inhibition was 150 MPa. This work suggests the use of high hydrostatic pressure and plant essential oils as an alternative control for fruit diseases.
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