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Molecular phylogeny of tribe Schismatoglottideae (Araceae) based on two plastid markers and recognition of a new tribe, Philonotieae, from the neotropics

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Tribe Schismatoglottideae comprises one large genus, Schismatoglottis, and six small 'satellite' genera. A combined molecular phylogenetic analysis of matK, the 3′ portion of the trnK intron, and trnL-F sequence data was carried out on 77 taxa representing all genera in the tribe, all informal groups in Schismatoglottis, together with sister tribe Cryptocoryneae, and outgroups from Araceae. Analyses of combined datasets with parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods revealed tribe Schismatoglottideae to be a polyphyletic assemblage. Neotropical Schismatoglottis is shown to be sister to the palaeotropical Schismatoglottideae + Cryptocoryneae. Schismatoglottis acuminatissima is a sister clade to the rest of the Schismatoglottideae. Palaeotropical Schismatoglottis is unsupported as a monophyletic genus. A new neotropical tribe of Araceae, Philonotieae S.Y. Wong & P.C. Boyce, sister to Cryptocoryneae + palaeotropical Schismatoglottideae, is proposed.
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... & Moritzi is the largest genus of the tribe, with probably in excess of 250 species restricted to per humid and everwet tropical Asia (Boyce & Wong, 2007). Recent taxonomic and systematic treatments for the genus include an alpha taxonomy (Hay & Yuzammi, 2000), and various additional novel taxa (e.g., Wong & Boyce, 2010a, b, c;Wong & al., 2010). One outcome of the partial phylogenetic treatment was the resurrection of the genus Apoballis Schott, and the transfer of 12 former Schismatoglottis species to Apoballis (Table 1). ...
... data), except for the genus Amorphophallus Blume ex Decne., where many different ornamentation types occur within a single genus (Van der Ham & al., 1998). Pollen of all Schismatoglot tis species and species within the recently resurrected New World genus Philonotion Schott (Wong & al., 2010), so far studied by us (Appendix), is psilate, in accordance with literature reports (Grayum, 1992;. Curiously Thanikaimoni (1969) Unfortunately, Thanikaimoni's report was overlooked and even suspected as a misinterpretation of fungal spores (Grayum, 1992). ...
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... In addition, several molecular phylogenetic studies in Araceae have been published recently. Although these have mostly focused on the family level, species-level studies of Old World and temperate taxa have been conducted as well (e.g., Grob et al., 2004;Renner et al., 2004;Mansion et al., 2008;Wong et al., 2010). Despite the fact that tropical America holds ca. ...
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Thesis
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Thesis
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