Article

A Prospective Study Investigating the Effectiveness of a New Lens Filter (Migralens) in Reducing the Impact of Migraine

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Abstract

Background: Migraine sufferers typically report photophobia associated with their attacks and are particularly sensitive to the blue and red ends of the spectrum.Objective: To develop a new lens filter and test it in a prospective study in a group of migraine sufferers.Methods: Patients with a history of migraine who suffered from migraine alone or migraine combined with chronic daily headache (CDH) took part in a prospective, open study. Patients were evaluated at baseline and treated their migraine attacks for 1 month (migraine/CDH) or 2 months (migraine) with a new lens filter (Migralens) that reduces light transmission at the 400–450 nm (blue) and 560–640 nm (red) ends of the spectrum. Patients' headache severity, headache impact (Headache Impact Test [HIT-6] score) and functional ability, and their subjective responses to efficacy, light sensitivity and perceived clinical utility of the new lenses, were recorded at baseline and during and after treatment. The primary endpoints were the changes in headache severity and HIT-6 score after treatment, analysed as paired-sample t-tests.Results: Twenty-five patients who were severely affected by their migraine attacks took part in the study, 16 with migraine and nine with migraine/CDH. For the total population, the median headache intensity at baseline was severe and the mean HIT-6 score was 65.04. After treatment with the new lenses, the headache severity and HIT-6 score were significantly improved compared with baseline values (p < 0.001 for both assessments). The median headache severity improved to moderate and the mean HIT-6 score improved to 61.28. Similar significant improvements in headache severity and HIT-6 score were reported for both the migraine and migraine/CDH groups. These responses coincided with improvements in patients' subjective perceptions of migraine symptoms and sensitivity to different light sources. Most patients wanted to continue using the lenses and were willing to recommend them to other sufferers.Conclusions: Use of the new lenses for migraine resulted in a reduction in migraine headache severity and impact, and in improvements in patients' subjective assessments of efficacy and light sensitivity. The Migralens spectacles may therefore become a new addition to the armamentarium of migraine treatments available to sufferers.

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