Article

Identification of an Alarm Pheromone in the Ant Crematogaster peringueyi

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Abstract

Chemical alarm communication commonly occurs among the social Hymenoptera, particularly among the more highly organized species in which the number of workers per colony is large (Maschwitz 1964). Several of the pheromones concerned with this alarm communication have been chemically identified, but the number identified is small compared with the large number of social Hymenoptera in which they must occur, even after allowance is made for an evident lack of specificity between related species. We report the identification of octan-3-one as the major component of an alarm pheromone complex from the heads of Crematogaster peringueyi Emery. This ketone has not previously been identified as an alarm pheromone in any species of social insect.

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... When crushed heads of C mimosae or. C negriceps were presented to either species on the tree, the ants displayed alarm behavior like thai described for C peringueyi (Crewe et al. 1969). No response was obtained when other body parts were used. ...
... Comparably, also octan-3-one has been reported from the secretions of various insects, in particular from the mandibular glands of myrmicine ants (e.g., Crewe et al 1969). ...
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