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Note sur quelques insectes récoltés au piège Malaise en Guyane française

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Nous présentons ici les premiers résultats d'un travail de collecte, à l'aide de pièges Malaise, d'insectes de Guyane française. Trois régions ont été investiguées: la région de la Basse-Mana, la région de Saint-Laurent-du-Maroni et les MOntagnes de Kaw. Les résultats présentés mettent l'accent sur les Hyménoptères présents sauf pour la région de la Basse-Mana où d'autres ordres ont été pris en compte. La faune observées, telle que nous la révèlent ces derniers résultats, comporte surtout des espèces communes. Toutefois, pour la première fois, nous pouvons signalés la présence en Guyane de Epsilogaster panama Whitfield & Mason, 1994 (Braconidae) Monomachus ?glaberrimus Schletterer, 1890 (Monomachidae), Mysticagenia sp.n. (Pompilidae), Rhopalosoma guianenses Schulz, 1906 et Olixon testaceum Cameron, 1887 (Rhopalosomatidae), Clystopsenella longiventris Kieffer, 1911 (Scolebythidae).
... In general, the use of several capture methods is necessary for inventory of species with diverse life histories such as beetles, which constitute the largest insect order ( Lhoir et al., 2003). Braet et al. (2000) recommended that insects in tropical environments would be more effectively inventoried with combined use of different trapping methods. So far, investigation on beetles using several methods of capture has not been conducted in Ivory Coast. ...
... The pitfall traps are suitable for collecting ground-dwelling beetles. The complementary abilities of different traps to collect different insects make it necessary to use them in combination with others for faunal inventories ( Braet et al., 2000). . ...
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