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Available from: Martha E Shenton
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    • "Those with the highest exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact showed the thinnest cortex, suggesting a cumulative effect of subconcussive brain trauma. This is in line with our previous work demonstrating alterations of the white matter microarchitecture in younger professional soccer players without a history of concussion (Koerte et al. 2012). Further, within the soccer group, cortical thinning in the right posterior parietal and occipital region was associated with estimated exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact . "
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    ABSTRACT: Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. Soccer players are at high risk for repetitive subconcussive head impact when heading the ball. Whether this leads to long-term alterations of the brain's structure associated with cognitive decline remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate cortical thickness in former professional soccer players using high-resolution structural MR imaging. Fifteen former male professional soccer players (mean age 49.3 [SD 5.1] years) underwent high-resolution structural 3 T MR imaging, as well as cognitive testing. Fifteen male, age-matched former professional non-contact sport athletes (mean age 49.6 [SD 6.4] years) served as controls. Group analyses of cortical thickness were performed using voxel-based statistics. Soccer players demonstrated greater cortical thinning with increasing age compared to controls in the right inferolateral-parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex. Cortical thinning was associated with lower cognitive performance as well as with estimated exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact. Neurocognitive evaluation revealed decreased memory performance in the soccer players compared to controls. The association of cortical thinning and decreased cognitive performance, as well as exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact, further supports the hypothesis that repetitive subconcussive head impact may play a role in early cognitive decline in soccer players. Future studies are needed to elucidate the time course of changes in cortical thickness as well as their association with impaired cognitive function and possible underlying neurodegenerative process.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Brain Imaging and Behavior
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    • "There is a real need for novel neuro-imaging assessment tools that can be used to evaluate concussion in individual patients and generate useful quantitative biomarkers that can aid in the diagnosis, prognostication, and management of post-concussion syndrome (PCS). Recent studies have applied sophisticated neuro-imaging techniques including magnetoencephalography (MEG), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography, and task-based fMRI [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27]. Despite detecting changes between groups of concussion patients and healthy controls, none of these techniques have emerged as clinical tools that can reliably confirm the diagnosis of concussion, quantify concussion severity, or assess clinical recovery in individual patients. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background There is a real need for quantifiable neuro-imaging biomarkers in concussion. Here we outline a brain BOLD-MRI CO2 stress test to assess the condition. Methods This study was approved by the REB at the University of Manitoba. A group of volunteers without prior concussion were compared to post-concussion syndrome (PCS) patients – both symptomatic and recovered asymptomatic. Five 3-minute periods of BOLD imaging at 3.0 T were studied – baseline 1 (BL1– at basal CO2 tension), hypocapnia (CO2 decreased ∼5 mmHg), BL2, hypercapnia (CO2 increased ∼10 mmHg) and BL3. Data were processed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for 1st level analysis to compare each subject’s response to the CO2 stress at the p = 0.001 level. A 2nd level analysis compared each PCS patient’s response to the mean response of the control subjects at the p = 0.05 level. Results We report on 5 control subjects, 8 symptomatic and 4 asymptomatic PCS patients. Both increased and decreased response to CO2 was seen in all PCS patients in the 2nd level analysis. The responses were quantified as reactive voxel counts: whole brain voxel counts (2.0±1.6%, p = 0.012 for symptomatic patients for CO2 response < controls and 3.0±5.1%, p = 0.139 for CO2 response > controls: 0.49±0.31%, p = 0.053 for asymptomatic patients for CO2 response < controls and 4.4±6.8%, p = 0.281 for CO2 response > controls). Conclusions Quantifiable alterations in regional cerebrovascular responsiveness are present in concussion patients during provocative CO2 challenge and BOLD MRI and not in healthy controls. Future longitudinal studies must aim to clarify the relationship between CO2 responsiveness and individual patient symptoms and outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    • "Results were not given separately for the 14 players who did not suffer a concussion nor was their neurologic status. Additionally, Koerte et al compared the DTI scans of 12 male elite-level club soccer players to 8 male competitive swimmers, none of whom reported a history of concussion [21]. Soccer players had multiple brain regions with increased mean radial and axial diffusivity but none with significant changes in MD or FA. "
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    ABSTRACT: Repetitive head impacts (RHI) sustained in contact sports are thought to be necessary for the long-term development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Our objectives were to: 1) characterize the magnitude and persistence of RHI-induced white matter (WM) changes; 2) determine their relationship to kinematic measures of RHI; and 3) explore their clinical relevance. Prospective, observational study of 10 Division III college football players and 5 non-athlete controls during the 2011-12 season. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), physiologic, cognitive, and balance testing at pre-season (Time 1), post-season (Time 2), and after 6-months of no-contact rest (Time 3). Head impact measures were recorded using helmet-mounted accelerometers. The percentage of whole-brain WM voxels with significant changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) from Time 1 to 2, and Time 1 to 3 was determined for each subject and correlated to head impacts and clinical measures. Total head impacts for the season ranged from 431-1,850. No athlete suffered a clinically evident concussion. Compared to controls, athletes experienced greater changes in FA and MD from Time 1 to 2 as well as Time 1 to 3; most differences at Time 2 persisted to Time 3. Among athletes, the percentage of voxels with decreased FA from Time 1 to 2 was positively correlated with several helmet impact measures. The persistence of WM changes from Time 1 to 3 was also associated with changes in serum ApoA1 and S100B autoantibodies. WM changes were not consistently associated with cognition or balance. A single football season of RHIs without clinically-evident concussion resulted in WM changes that correlated with multiple helmet impact measures and persisted following 6 months of no-contact rest. This lack of WM recovery could potentially contribute to cumulative WM changes with subsequent RHI exposures.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · PLoS ONE
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