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Researching Blue's Clues: Viewing Behavior and Impact

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Abstract

Blue's Clues is a preschool television series designed to promote mastery of thinking and problem-solving skills. This paper summarizes a series of studies concerning the impact of the program on television viewing behaviors and on cognitive development. Three studies of viewing behavior indicate that as preschool children were in the process of learning from the program they were relatively quiet and highly attentive. As they mastered the content they became increasingly vocal and interactive. Their tendency to interact with Blue's Clues transferred to another program from a different series. A longitudinal study comparing children who regularly watched Blue's Clues to demographically similar children who could not receive the program indicated that the program had a positive impact on cognitive development.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright ©2000. All Rights Reserved.
... The now-classic Sesame Street (1969), as well as other shows that followed its steps (Barney & Friends (1992) and Blue's Clues (1996)), has used empirical formative research to design its programs (Anderson et al., 2000;Fisch, Truglio, & Cole, 1999;Singer & Singer, 1998). Sesame Street, for instance, was developed to help support the school readiness skills of at-risk youth by merging educational lessons into an entertaining and engaging format (Fisch & Truglio, 2001). ...
... Sesame Street and other similar children's educational shows rely on empirical tests after their completion to make sure that its goals have been achieved (Fisch & Truglio, 2001;Piotrowski, 2018). These evaluations have demonstrated strong effects on the development of children's academic and social skills (Anderson et al., 2000;Crawley, Anderson, Wilder, Williams, & Santomero, 1999;Fisch et al., 1999;Jennings, Hooker, & Linebarger, 2009;Mares & Pan, 2013;Piotrowski, 2018;Singer & Singer, 1998). For Sesame Street, for example, evaluations have shown that viewers of the show spent more time reading and engaging in educational activities, not only as children but also as teens years later (Fisch et al., 1999;Huston, Anderson, Wright, Linebarger, & Schmitt, 2001). ...
Chapter
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Entertainment-education (EE) and educational television for children and adolescents have been around for a long time, and while they have clear differences, they also overlap in many ways. The current chapter aims to overview the similarities between these two types of media content, such as the theoretical background and research structures that they both share. Readers are invited to consider the existing overlap and to close the gap between the two bodies of literature that have formed over the years to strengthen the field of educational content for young audiences. Furthermore, the appearance of digital EE for youth is also discussed in this context, highlighting its future potential.
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Chapter
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This study relies on a national survey of parents and children and interviews with children to assess the extent and nature of use of videocassette recorders (VCRs) by children and adolescents. It reports on developmental changes in the use of VCRs for repeated viewing of videos, as well as children's descriptions of when and why they rewind and fast-forward videos.