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... Equally, however, the focusing effect of disasters has also been found to escalate research activity at the expense of scientific quality, when large volumes of often duplicative research are produced for largely opportunistic or political ends (Rodriguez et al. 2007, Black 2003, Birkland 2009). The convergence of researchers into a disaster zone, moreover, has been identified as a significant additional burden on regions struggling to cope in the aftermath of disaster (Brown and Donini 2014, Walton-Ellery and Rashid 2012, Sumathipala et al. 2010, Brun 2009, Gill et al. 2007, Sumathipala and Siribaddana, 2005. The Belmont Report (1979) provided three principles that continue to mark ethical limits beyond which researchers are not free to collect scientific data. ...
... Research activity must not only not do harm to participating individuals or groupsit should also actively provide benefits (the beneficence principle). Thirdly, the distributive justice principle dictates that research should not be conducted if it puts groups at risk of bearing "unequal burdens in research" because of their "ready availability in settings where research is conducted" (Sumathipala and Siribaddana 2005, p. 1419, citing Belmont Report 1979; see also Gill et al. 2007 andBrown andDonini 2014). Finding that increased research activity in disaster zones risks breaching both the beneficence and distributive justice principles, several ethicists have called for more active interventions to manage such activity, with a view to reducing this risk after disasters (Sumathipala and Siribaddana 2005, Citraningtyas et al. 2010, Sumathipala et al. 2010). ...
... Driven by rapid developments after the disaster, this directive was the result of assumptions and swift decision making concerning the distribution of tasks between the response operation and NHRP, the scope of NHRP function and responsibility, and participation in research activity into the disaster and its impacts. The directive is also important because it indexes the research pressure that Birkland and others have identified as a secondary effect of the high profile generated by major disasters (Birkland 2009, Rodriquez et al. 2007, Citraningtyas et al. 2010, Brown and Donini 2014, Gill et al. 2007). In addition to (scientific) risks to research quality, this pressure carries more immediate risks of particular concern to the response operation. ...
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This article argues that active coordination of research engagement after disasters has the potential to maximize research opportunities, improve research quality, increase end-user engagement, and manage escalating research activity to mitigate the ethical risks posed to impacted populations. We focus on the coordination of research activity after the 22 February 2011 Mw6.2 Christchurch earthquake by the then newly formed national research consortium, the Natural Hazards Research Platform, which included a social science research moratorium during the declared state of national emergency. Decisions defining this organization's functional and structural parameters are analyzed to identify lessons concerning the need for systematic approaches to the management of post-disaster research, in collaboration with the response effort. Other lessons include the importance of involving an existing, broadly based research consortium, ensuring that this consortium's coordination role is fully integrated into emergency management structures, and ensuring that all aspects of decision-making processes are transparent and easily accessed.
... However, special care must be taken to ensure research is done in an ethical and compassionate way. A group of social scientists met after Hurricane Katrina and established eight criteria to guide research on the disaster (Gill et al., 2007). While all eight criteria are relevant to occupational therapy research, the following four resonate most strongly with the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards (AOTA, 2010a) and occupational justice: ...
... However, special care must be taken to ensure research is done in an ethical and compassionate way. A group of social scientists met after Hurricane Katrina and established eight criteria to guide research on the disaster (Gill et al., 2007). While all eight criteria are relevant to occupational therapy research, the following four resonate most strongly with the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards (AOTA, 2010a) and occupational justice: ...
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