Article

Relationship Skills Training in Schools: Some Fieldwork Observations

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Abstract

The importance of training in relationship skills is emphasised. Following a review of the British and American literature on relationship skills training in schools, a year-long relationship skills course with a group of Australian secondary-school students of low academic achievement is described. The course had mixed success. Issues and problems pertaining to the course and to doing this kind of work in schools are discussed. These issues include: theoretical assumptions, content of course, size of group, composition of group, training methods, facilitating motivation and participation, and assessment. Though its difficulty should not be underestimated, relationship skills training in schools represents an exciting challenge.

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