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Abstract

This article describes a civic engagement and service learning living-learning community on a dedicated floor in a university residence hall. Students volunteered to live with one another while concurrently enrolled in social work service-learning courses. Student assessment of the combined affect service learning and residence hall living-learning experience on community engagement is presented for three cohorts of participants.

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... Service learning, hereinafter referred to as SL, is not a new methodology (Sedlak et al, 2003). It is a pedagogical conciliatory strategy that nurtures collaboration, mutual respect, relations between people and endeavours to establish the bridges between the University, the students and the community (Petracchi et al, 2010). Is a pedagogical approach and it addresses education from an experience perspective. ...
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The Service Learning is an articulated, consistent and coordinated teaching-learning methodology. It resorts to unique assumptions, integrates the learning of technical and scientific knowledge with the personal, social and community development. This methodology permits the student to realise interdisciplinary work and produce plasticity on his/her creativity whilst producing cognitive, personal, social, emotional and transcendental knowledge. This process allows for the development of interpersonal, intrapersonal relations, communication, it fosters joint work and networking, leadership, cooperation and negotiation, personal effectiveness, self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-motivation. It also sensitises students to address humanitarian issues and for the everyday life of the community and social responsibility. This study reflects on the importance of teaching-learning methodology based on Service Learning and it discusses the relevance of its inclusion in the academic curriculum. It uses qualitative methods of data collection and analysis, favouring group interviews with content analysis.
... Service-learning pedagogy incorporates the didactic classroom content, community service, stakeholders' interactions, and collaborative relationships. The co-creation approaches, framed by AI, help students (1) facilitate their project-based group work; (2) be receptive to socially relevant knowledge, and (3) benefit the community and the social work or human service professions (Artale, 2001;Petracchi, Weaver, Engel, Kolivoski & Das, 2010;Stoecker, Loving, Reddy, & Bollig, 2010). Service-learning models directly linked to communities, CBOs, and human service agencies expose students to diverse populations and socially relevant human service matters (Mather & Konkle, 2013). ...
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Service-learning provides an opportunity for BSW students to actively apply course concepts in the field. Experiential learning can transform abstract theories that substantiate multidimensional contexts into practical scenarios in the field. Although service-learning courses are encouraged, faculty workload concerns and the need for guided, structured experiences deter many faculty members from participating. Appreciative inquiry, a strategy focused on using strengths to build solutions in agencies, can provide a framework for student assignments that entail student-group work with community agencies and communities. Using this framework, BSW students and instructors can co-create a learning experience through planned and structured interactions with community agencies. An explanation of appreciative inquiry and its utility in the service-learning classroom are presented. Keywords: appreciative inquiry, BSW education, service-learning, co-creation pedagogy, teaching strategies
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Thirty-six undergraduate students were required to complete a compulsory intergenerational service-learning subject that aims to develop them ability to communicate with elderly and apply essential principles to promote health in community setting. Students organized center activities or conducted home visits in nine weeks. A content analysis on students’ reflective essay after the intergenerational service-learning subject was conducted to evaluate their personal growth and insights into elderly community health services. Results indicated that students were able to apply the skills of health promotion, show empathy, identify needs of elderly services and build community engagement.
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Service-Learning as a co-curricular activity blends teaching and research can create comprehensive academic activity in higher education mission all over the world. Depending on the curricular framework on par with institutional vision and mission, each educational institution differs in conducting service-learning course in the neighborhood community through students. Service Learning as outside the classroom experience provides an opportunity for students to learn and exercise social awareness and leadership. The field experience and feedback learned by the students are discussed in the classroom wherein the faculty, researchers alike participates in the analysis. The need for community service calls the attention of students , researchers and faculty members. It also mobilizes staff resources at colleges and universities level for volunteering, which has been referred to as academic charity. This becomes the main component of co-curricular activity in many academic institutions in India. Loyola College, Chennai had been a harbinger in conducting in service learning programme for four decades holds scientific exposure which has been already utilized for many researchers and public policy framework by the state government, particularly on urban slum management and poverty alleviation. This study verifies whether this Loyola College Chennai model can be a suggestive model for all higher education institutions in India.
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This article briefly outlines the history of living-learning communities (LLC) in colleges and universities. It details conceptualization, design, implementation and assessment of such programs. Model recreation and leisure LLC are highlighted and discussed.
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Service learning is neither field education nor volunteerism. Rather, it is a pedagogical approach designed to reinforce classroom instruction with concurrent service activities occurring in the local community. This service is driven by community-identified needs. Service learning supports social work values, yet the profession has been slow to embrace it in social work education. This article reports results of a national survey examining the use of service learning among baccalaureate programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The majority of respondents report service learning is a required component of at least one course (generally an introductory or practice-based course) and has been incorporated into their programs for more than a decade. Results also suggest some programs may not implement service learning appropriately as it remains undifferentiated from volunteerism or field education.
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This article reviews research-based knowledge about service learning in social work education. Student learning outcomes common to both service learning and social work education are examined, and the research-based literature on service learning in social work is analyzed. Service-learning practice issues in social work education are described: creating learning activities distinct from those required in field practica, managing conflicts of interest among students employed in the field, minimizing professional ethics violations, and assisting students who observe unprofessional practice behaviors. Recommendations for planning, implementing, and evaluating service-learning projects in social work education are provided to strengthen scholarship in this area. Copyright © 2007, Council on Social Work Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The current interest in service learning provides universities with a unique opportunity to engage their students in community service, expand their educational agenda, and build reciprocal partnerships with the community. This article discusses the implementation of service learning by delineating a set of activities for four constituencies: institution, faculty, students, and community.
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Researchers typically focus on the defining features of learning communities and frequently examine how those features influence student achievement. Occasionally, researchers evaluate whether structural and programmatic variations across different types of learning community programs have an effect on academic and social outcomes. In this study, the focus is on differences among the sections within one first-year learning community program and the associations between these differences and measures of student achievement. These learning community sections vary considerably, and persistence and grades are higher for first-year students from learning communities that provide a strong sense of community, in which instructors are engaged and approachable, and where a strong and visible linkage exists between instructors, subject matter, and course organization.
Service learning and social work education: A natural but tenu-ous connection Social work and service learning: Partnerships for social justice The contributions of living–learning programs on developing sense of civic engagement in under-graduate students
  • A Phillips
Phillips, A. (2007). Service learning and social work education: A natural but tenu-ous connection. In M. Nadel, V. Majewski, & M. Sullivan-Cosetti (Eds.), Social work and service learning: Partnerships for social justice. New York: Rowman & Littlefield. Rowan-Kenyon, H., Soldner, M., & Inkelas, K. K. (2007). The contributions of living–learning programs on developing sense of civic engagement in under-graduate students. NASPA Journal, 44(4), 750–778.
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Inkelas, K. K., Brower, A. M., Crawford, S., Hummel, M., Pope, D., & Zeller, W. J. (2004). National study of living–learning programs: 2004 report of findings. Retrieved, April 25, 2010, from http://www.livelearnstudy.net/ additionalresources/reports.html Downloaded by [University of South Carolina ] at 04:00 05 October 2014
Service-learning and the development of democratic universi-ties, democratic schools, and democratic good societies in the 21st century
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Harkavy, I. (2004). Service-learning and the development of democratic universi-ties, democratic schools, and democratic good societies in the 21st century. In M. Welch & S.H. Billig (Eds.), New perspectives in service-learning: Research to advance the field (pp. 3–22). Greenwich, CT: Information Age.