Economic Evaluation of a Neural Tube Defect Recurrence–Prevention Program

ArticleinAmerican journal of preventive medicine 35(6):572-7 · November 2008with16 Reads
Impact Factor: 4.53 · DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.07.008 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Women with a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect (NTD) are encouraged to take folic acid prior to a subsequent pregnancy, but it is unknown whether organized attempts to identify and counsel such women to prevent recurrent NTDs are cost effective.
    Data from the South Carolina recurrence-prevention program for October 2001-September 2002 were analyzed between October 2002 and December 2003 to calculate costs. Cost-effectiveness modeling of the program during 1992-2006 was conducted during 2007. Results were calculated for three scenarios based on recurrence risk, supplement use, and the effectiveness of folic acid in preventing recurrences. For each scenario, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated separately using prevented NTD-affected live births; prevented NTD-affected births (including fetal deaths); and all prevented NTD-affected pregnancies.
    The prevention program cost approximately $155,000 per year in 2003 dollars to protect 35 pregnancies and prevent approximately one NTD. The direct costs associated with an NTD depend on type and outcome, but are approximately $560,000 in 2003 dollars for a live birth with spina bifida. The base-case cost-effectiveness ratio was $39,600 per QALY gained from avoided NTD-affected live births and stillbirths, and $14,700 per QALY gained from the avoidance of all NTD-affected pregnancies. The baseline NTD recurrence risk and the use of folic acid supplements by women who are at high risk for an NTD-affected pregnancy were influential parameters.
    The South Carolina NTD recurrence-prevention program appears comparable in cost effectiveness to other preventive services. Other states might consider including NTD recurrence prevention in birth defect-prevention programs.