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Sustainable consumption American style: Nutrition education, active living and financial literacy

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Abstract

The 1992 Earth Summit highlighted the critical role of consumption in affluent nations as a source of global environmental deterioration. While most developed countries have begun over the past decade to grapple with the difficult challenges of reducing household demand for energy and materials, sustainable consumption has yet to attract substantive attention in the United States. There exist, however, several strategic openings that American proponents of more environmentally benign household provisioning could exploit to launch a public dialogue about the environmental implications of contemporary consumption. First, public health professionals have in recent years begun to make significant strides publicizing the nutritional inadequacy of the American diet and the contributory role it plays in elevating incidences of chronic disease. Second, the rapid increase in the rate of obesity in the country is now coming to be understood as a health problem that is attributable to the prevalence of sedentary lifestyles. Finally, there is growing public concern in the United States over the accumulation of unprecedented levels of consumer debt and the epidemic of personal bankruptcies. The intent of this paper is to highlight the need to consider the personal dimensions of everyday life when formulating strategies to foster more sustainable consumption.
... Scholars from all around the world, especially those who studied the recycling of waste, have carried out research (Hanyu et al. 2000;Barr et al. 2005). In addition, some scholars examined the factors that affect people's health and lives, such as dietary changes and food nutrition, so as to formulate sustainable consumption strategies (Cohen 2005;Duchin 2005). Methodological innovations mainly combined the input-output method or life cycle assessment with other methods to study issues related to carbon dioxide emissions and the carbon footed a sense of global cultural identity in order to combine material products with green positioning (Strizhakova and Coulter 2013), and they need to explore the factors that affect green purchasing while also ensuring that they promote a successful "green" image (Chen and Chang 2012). ...
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Green consumption (GC), as one of the important initiatives to achieve the goal of carbon peaking and carbon neutrality, has attracted widespread attention from scholars in environmental and economic fields. This article reviews the literature on GC, asking two main questions: how can GC research be analyzed from macro, meso, and micro perspectives? How have the research topics in the field of GC evolved in international and Chinese academia? This study makes a visual analysis of knowledge domain based on the literature of Web of Science Core Collection and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, so as to reveal hot topics, stage division, and research trend of GC research. The results revealed the following: GC research is in a period of rapid growth, and it is mainly distributed in developed countries dominated by the USA and in developing countries dominated by China. There is a trend of interdisciplinary research on GC, such as ecology, psychology, health, systematics, politics, and economics, which indicates that GC research has become increasingly inseparable from human survival and health, psychological acceptance, and social development. For the international academia, GC research pays more attention to the transformation of consumer psychology, while the Chinese academia is more concerned with the regulation of consumer behavior and the activation of green emotions. Considering the focus and characteristics of GC supervision, this study proposes GC 3.0 with a consumer-oriented and emphasizing green emotions and proposes future application scenarios from four aspects: government supervision, social self-regulation, enterprise demonstration, and personal self-monitoring.
... Currently, developing countries are considering sustainable consumption behavior (SCB) more than developed countries (Lai, 2011). Some developing countries such as India (Cuevas et al., 2019), Brazil (Severo et al., 2017), Egypt (Shaban & El-Bassiouny, 2015), and developed countries such as the United States (Cohen, 2005) and Germany (Vinz, 2009) focus on the development of SCB. In recent years, more and more studies begin to explore the SCB in China (Wang et al., 2014). ...
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In recent years, the concept of sustainable consumption behavior (SCB) is largely introduced and changed continuously to be discussed with industries such as energy sector, agriculture, transportation, sharing economy, and tourism. However, the study of sustainable consumption behavior in the online education industry (SCBOEI) remains a research gap. Thus, this paper aims to identify the significance of sustainable consumption behavior and theoretically conceptualize SCBOEI. This study employs content and text analysis to reconceptualize the major theories that contribute to the research of SCB. The findings in this study show that SCBOEI is contributed of great significance to promote sustainable development. In addition, this study introduces a model of SCBOEI, in which the consumer value theory, social exchange theory, and planned behavior theory are integrated. Additionally, this paper suggests that value, environmental attitude, identity, consumer engagement, and contextual factors (government behavior, market conditions, and environmental education) are highly important to extend the research on SCBOEI. In conclusion, this study strongly recommends that SCB research shall be directed to the online education industry. Furthermore, future studies shall emphasize the empirical effects of psychological factors, activity factors, and contextual factors for SCBOEI to find the correlation.
... O como ocurre en algunos países, no se promueven políticas de consumo sustentable por considerarlas contrarias al desarrollo económico. En palabras de Cohen, 2005: "El consumo sustentable es visto como incompatible con las prioridades políticas que enfatizan el crecimiento económico" la promoción de la autonomía del consumidor, el excesivo uso de energía y la acumulación irrestricta de bienes materiales" (p. ...
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El consumo sustentable parece estar entre los que tienen conciencia ambiental y los que tiene comportamientos proambientales, por esta razón la importancia de llevar acabo esta investigación que nos permitiera analizar los aspectos de la situación actual de los consumidores, su interés ambiental y pautas asociadas al cuidado del medio ambiente. Bajo el enfoque de investigación cuantitativa con diseño descriptivo, los principales hallazgos que se encontraron fueron; identificar que el 70% de la población tiene poco interés en cuidar el medio ambiente, por consecuencia el planeta y solo 17% de la población deposita la basura en los lugares que se indican por parte del gobierno. Además, el 13% separa la basura, los residuos que se separan con mayor regularidad son botella de plástico y el papel. Nos llevó a concluir que existe poca educación ambiental y una tasa muy baja de comportamiento proambiental en la población de Matehuala.
... In this context, to reconcile diverse interests, it is relevant to consider the relations between governments and the other actors involved in the process. Because the changes implemented may affect the economy and society (Cohen, 2005(Cohen, , 2010Tukker et al., 2008a). All official documents associated with sustainable development is addressing the question of the inter-sectorial as a critical factor of promoting sustainable consumption. ...
... SCP is seen as an effort to "decouple" economic growth and environmental degradation by increasing the efficiency of resource use in the production, distribution and use of products, aiming to keep the energy, material and pollution intensity of all production and consumption functions within the carrying capacities of natural ecosystems. (Voigt 2015, p. 246) At the same time, a group of activists, scholars, and others, increasingly concerned with the effects of material consumption on the global environment, have catalyzed around a vocal group known as SCORAI (Sustainable Consumption Research and Action Initiative), * resulting in new activities and writings focusing on sustainable consumption (Cohen 2005;Cohen et al. 2010;. Parallel to this, there is an emerging discussion of "sufficiency," of both materials goods and energy, as a societal norm (Schneidewind and Zahrnt 2014). ...
... In this context, to reconcile diverse interests, it is relevant to consider the relations between governments and the other actors involved in the process. Because the changes implemented may affect the economy and society (Cohen, 2005(Cohen, , 2010Tukker et al., 2008a). All official documents associated with sustainable development is addressing the question of the inter-sectorial as a critical factor of promoting sustainable consumption. ...
... There are connections between the literature on consumer credit/finance and sustainable consumption. For instance, Juliet Schor (1991) included credit in her analysis of the work-and-spend cycle and Maurie Cohen (2005) suggested that swelling concern at the time about consumer debt and personal bankruptcy could be strategically exploited by proponents of sustainable consumption. He later followed this up by exploring the dynamics behind the increasing use of credit cards and the dramatic growth in consumer debt and argued that sustainable consumption research should focus on the implications of indebtedness with respect to both the quantity and the type of consumption (Cohen, 2007). ...
... If consumers in our simulation were equipped with a desire to acquire new car models (irrespective of their functional superiority over an existing vehicle), the model shows that transition to electric vehicles would go much faster due to higher vehicle replacement rate. Although emission-wise, this electrified fleet leads to an environmental advantage, on the whole this finding is in contrast with the "green consumerism" perspective, where a prolonged use and repair of products is advocated to reduce the environmental impact of production and waste (e.g., Cohen, 2005). ...
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