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Branding, celebritization and the lifestyle expert

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Abstract

The lifestyle expert – a figure whose knowledge is tied to the ordinary and the everyday – has emerged as a major cultural authority in recent times. This article examines the role and status of ‘ordinary experts’, such as Martha Stewart and Jamie Oliver, in relation to processes of ‘celebritization’ and branding. Linking these processes to broader shifts around the domestication and privatization of public culture and citizenship, I discuss the branding of lifestyle advice in the context of the emergence of informational capitalism and the growing role of the consumer in providing branded lifestyles with value and meaning. Arguing that the privatized modes of lifestyle consumption modelled by figures like Stewart and Oliver have emerged as a pre-eminent site of social relations, communality and lifestyle ‘activism’, the essay concludes with a discussion of what kind of civic politics might emerge out of this context.

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... A body of literature on lifestyle marketing explains the concept of lifestyle within market segmentation in the United States (Michman et al., 2003), offers a historical and systematic review of lifestyle in marketing research (Kahle & Valette-Florence, 2012) and analyzes the concept of lifestyle brand as regards global fashion companies (Saviolo & Marazza, 2013). Additionally, there is research on brand equity , self-expressive brands (Chernev et al., 2011) lifestyle TV productions (Taylor, 2002), lifestyle celebrity "personas" (Lewis, 2010) and lifestyle consumerism (Binkley, 2009). Some interpretative models exist (Helman & de Chernatony, 1999;Saviolo & Marazza, 2013), and its definition has been explored (Austin & Matos, 2013;Chernev et al., 2011;Jung & Merlin, 2003). ...
... Overall, these studies neither rely on nor offer a theoretical framework that would support empirical testing of lifestyle branding in the fashion industry; they thus fail to create a body of knowledge. Given the increasingly lifestyle-oriented consumer culture we live in (Lewis, 2010), there are calls to study how brand orientation can be operationalized in fashion retail (Bridson & Evans, 2004) and research on lifestyle from a brand perspective is on the rise. ...
... For some authors, this symbolic creation of the brand is about presenting a recognizable script of aesthetics (Dubois, 2012), which means establishing "a flagship brand for a certain lifestyle" (Hameide, 2011). Others claim that a global lifestyle brand attracts customers to clear concepts and themes (Oh et al., 2016) and value that emerges from the symbolic realm are structured through and around the brand (Lewis, 2010). However, among the publications, no authors specify what this dimension of the lifestyle brand represents and how it is related to other lifestyle brand dimensions or operationalized. ...
Article
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This paper expands knowledge of lifestyle branding by defining and identifying its scope, as well as its relationship to fashion branding. The term itself is ubiquitous in management, but remains undefined from a holistic point of view and is understudied in the academic literature. We thus address this gap and complement previous conceptualizations with empirical research on lifestyle fashion branding. The study herein relies on seven semi-structured, in-depth interviews with experienced Spanish fashion brand consultants who advise prestigious fashion companies in Spain. The interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis and Atlas.ti 7.5.18 software, employing an interpretive, qualitative approach. This paper’s primary contribution is found in its empirical study of lifestyle branding conceptualizations from fashion professionals with diverse fashion expertise, including in digital branding, lifestyle retailing, strategic communications, public relations, influencer marketing and social media. Insights into lifestyle branding conceptualizations in relation to fashion retailing emerge from their combined expertise, which then further point to opportunities for expanded research on lifestyle branding in a variety of fashion retail contexts.
... He and his companies are prime examples of the cultural production of popular lifestyle experts or gurus that engage audiences through optimising everyday life. Lewis (2008Lewis ( , 2010 suggests that the rise of the celebrity expert is one outgrowth of media culture, one growing from democratic capitalist forms (Marshall, 1997) that reconfigures distinctions between expert and ordinary discourse through a process of celebritisation. The celebrity-expert carries a kind of cultural authority characterised by a tension between 'a claim to exceptional or elite status and a kind of public representativeness' (Lewis, 2010, p. 582). ...
... Implicating dynamics of power, social status and democratisation, Lewis (2010) suggested that with growing mediatisation and commercialisation, it is the authority of traditional experts or intellectuals that has waned as 'more fashionable figures of authority such as the celebrity take centre stage' (ibid.). Within this process, media culture, and increasingly via social media, lifestyle experts, influencers, and expertise have diversified. ...
... Tae Bo workouts and Billy's Boot Camp programme) and others before him, represents a 'living brand' (Lury, 2004). In Lewis's (2010) terms, he represents a cultural authority that, on the one hand, mobilises his name and celebrity into an ontologicallymixed, commodified, multi-mediated, and merchandised entity, while simultaneously on the other hand displaces experts or intellectuals in health, fitness, or physical education. ...
Article
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In Spring 2020, the UK Government announced the cessation of in-person teaching for the vast majority of school-aged children in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Prompting an accelerated shift towards digital learning across the curriculum, this announcement was accompanied by a rise in market-based solutions to address the problem of keeping young people active, ‘healthy’ and ‘positive’ whilst at home. The most prominent of these was offered by Joe Wicks, who broadcasted PE with Joe live globally via YouTube for five days per week for eighteen weeks. The aim of this paper is to critically explore some of the contextual factors that enabled Joe Wicks to create and legitimise a public health intervention under the title of physical education, and henceforth position himself (whether intentionally or not) as an authoritative agent for change within the discipline. After outlining who Joe Wicks is, we unpack the discursive framing of PE with Joe in order to locate Wicks’ intervention amid the perennial politics of physical education. We then consider the meaning of PE with Joe and why Joe Wicks’ involvement in physical education matters, reflecting upon the effects of Joe Wicks on the future of physical education practice and research. Among our conclusions is that the Covid-19 pandemic provided an opportunity for Joe Wicks – here positioned and understood as a branded, celebrity lifestyle enterprise – to manoeuvre himself (and his products) from the periphery to the centre of physical education’s public imagery and discourse. Furthermore, we argue that exploring the ways in which Wicks’ presence in the physical education space has been received, embraced, modified, challenged and resisted is vital in discerning PE with Joe’s actual or perceived effects on the social construction of physical education, and the educational engagements of young people in physical activity in the post-Covid-19 landscape.
... In this article, the Mail then portrays the "golden couple" as experts in lifestyle (Lewis 2007(Lewis , 2010 which is highlighted by how eager they presumably were to get back to their daughter. in particular is portrayed as a "cultural icon of feminity, the 'supermom' who effortlessly [can] do it all" (Thompson 1996, 388). ...
... In addition, as Rose (1999) argues, the seduction to healthism takes place through advertising and media (see also Featherstone 1982). More specifically, media has framed celebrities as experts in lifestyle (Lewis 2007(Lewis , 2010, consumption (Hackley and Hackley 2015) and, indeed, health (Hoffman and Tan 2013) by framing celebrity lifestyle as aspirational. Furthermore, by framing celebrity lifestyle as aspirational and by framing consumption as a way to emulate the celebrity lifestyle, the media perpetuates consumerism and thus the neoliberal project (see Ayo 2012) via the celebrities. ...
... In this way it is possible to turn a celebrity fashion, with its connotations of faddism and overzealousness, into a normalised consumption practice. Indeed, while extant literature has established that "celebrities function as a mode of economic production whereby cultural resources are celebritized in pursuit of marketplace appeals" (Brownlie and Hewer 2009), and that celebrities have become experts in lifestyle (Lewis 2007(Lewis , 2010, consumption (Hackley and Hackley 2015) and health (Hoffman and Tan 2013), what this study aims to show is that this status is not static. In fact, this status depends on how the media negotiates their positive deviance. ...
Cover Page
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How is positive deviance utilised by the news media in the destigmatisation of a consumption practice? I study this question in the context of veganism through critically informed frame analysis of a major British newspaper, the Daily Mail. This context is ideal for such an analysis as the image of veganism has been transformed in the recent years from a stigmatised lifestyle to a normalised, healthy diet. Furthermore, this transformation has particularly taken place through celebrities, who are conceptualised as positive deviants. I then develop a discursive framing perspective of the role of media in the destigmatisation process of a consumption practice. The resulting framework shows how media can use positive deviance in destigmatisation by managing both the boundaries of the stigmatised practice and the dynamics of positive deviancy. Moreover, this framework contextualises the different frames in terms of the organisational, institutional, and national context as well as macro-level ideologies.
... In this article, the Mail then portrays the "golden couple" as experts in lifestyle (Lewis 2007(Lewis , 2010 which is highlighted by how eager they presumably were to get back to their daughter. in particular is portrayed as a "cultural icon of feminity, the 'supermom' who effortlessly [can] do it all" (Thompson 1996, 388). ...
... In addition, as Rose (1999) argues, the seduction to healthism takes place through advertising and media (see also Featherstone 1982). More specifically, media has framed celebrities as experts in lifestyle (Lewis 2007(Lewis , 2010, consumption (Hackley and Hackley 2015) and, indeed, health (Hoffman and Tan 2013) by framing celebrity lifestyle as aspirational. Furthermore, by framing celebrity lifestyle as aspirational and by framing consumption as a way to emulate the celebrity lifestyle, the media perpetuates consumerism and thus the neoliberal project (see Ayo 2012) via the celebrities. ...
... In this way it is possible to turn a celebrity fashion, with its connotations of faddism and overzealousness, into a normalised consumption practice. Indeed, while extant literature has established that "celebrities function as a mode of economic production whereby cultural resources are celebritized in pursuit of marketplace appeals" (Brownlie and Hewer 2009), and that celebrities have become experts in lifestyle (Lewis 2007(Lewis , 2010, consumption (Hackley and Hackley 2015) and health (Hoffman and Tan 2013), what this study aims to show is that this status is not static. In fact, this status depends on how the media negotiates their positive deviance. ...
Article
Full-text available
How is positive deviance utilised by the news media in the destigmatisation of a consumption practice? I study this question in the context of veganism through critically informed frame analysis of a major British newspaper, the Daily Mail. This context is ideal for such an analysis as the image of veganism has been transformed in the recent years from a stigmatised lifestyle to a normalised, healthy diet. Furthermore, this transformation has particularly taken place through celebrities, who are conceptualised as positive deviants. I then develop a discursive framing perspective of the role of media in the destigmatisation process of a consumption practice. The resulting framework shows how media can use positive deviance in destigmatisation by managing both the boundaries of the stigmatised practice and the dynamics of positive deviancy. Moreover, this framework contextualises the different frames in terms of the organisational, institutional, and national context as well as macro-level ideologies.
... Celebrity involvement in food issues and ethical consumption has increased over recent years (Johnston & Goodman, 2015;Lewis, 2010;Littler, 2008). Often termed cultural intermediaries (Piper, 2015) for conferring particular forms of knowledge to audiences, celebrities also perform the broader lifestyle project of neo-liberal societies by improving the privatized and lifestyled self through reflexive modes of consumption as a form of political citizenship (Lewis, 2010). ...
... Celebrity involvement in food issues and ethical consumption has increased over recent years (Johnston & Goodman, 2015;Lewis, 2010;Littler, 2008). Often termed cultural intermediaries (Piper, 2015) for conferring particular forms of knowledge to audiences, celebrities also perform the broader lifestyle project of neo-liberal societies by improving the privatized and lifestyled self through reflexive modes of consumption as a form of political citizenship (Lewis, 2010). Although celebrity vegans who educate about veganism perform a campaigning role (like celebrity chefs, or celebrity activists), they also intimately embody it through their own (vegan) consumption habits. ...
... As "ethicalized cultural intermediaries" (Lewis & Huber, 2015, p. 290), celebrities are also media creations and branded commodities (Johnston & Goodman, 2015); products of the political economy of neo-liberal societies with individualized consumer lifestyles as prioritized forms of citizenship. Celebrities are intimately bound up with the processes of celebrity production that require the commodification of the celebrity as a brand (Lewis, 2010), and of their views for consumption. Celebrity vegans achieve their status as celebrities first, before migrating into other social fields (Driessens, 2013). ...
Data
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... Celebrity involvement in food issues and ethical consumption has increased over recent years (Littler, 2008;Lewis, 2010;Johnston & Goodman, 2015). Often termed cultural intermediaries (Piper, 2015) for conferring particular forms of knowledge to audiences, celebrities also perform the broader lifestyle project of neo-liberal societies by improving the privatised and lifestyled self through reflexive modes of consumption as a form of political citizenship (Lewis, 2010). ...
... Celebrity involvement in food issues and ethical consumption has increased over recent years (Littler, 2008;Lewis, 2010;Johnston & Goodman, 2015). Often termed cultural intermediaries (Piper, 2015) for conferring particular forms of knowledge to audiences, celebrities also perform the broader lifestyle project of neo-liberal societies by improving the privatised and lifestyled self through reflexive modes of consumption as a form of political citizenship (Lewis, 2010). Although celebrity vegans who educate about veganism perform a campaigning role (like celebrity chefs, or celebrity activists), they also intimately embody it through their own (vegan) consumption habits. ...
... As "ethicalized cultural intermediaries" (Lewis and Huber, 2015, p. 290), celebrities are also media creations and branded commodities (Johnston & Goodman, 2015); products of the political economy of neo-liberal societies with individualised consumer lifestyles as prioritised forms of citizenship. Celebrities are intimately bound up with the processes of celebrity production that require the commodification of the celebrity as a brand (Lewis, 2010), and of their views for consumption. Celebrity vegans achieve their status as celebrities first, before migrating into other social fields (Driessens, 2013). ...
Article
Full-text available
Veganism offers an important critique of unethical and unsustainable food production practices, yet vegans have been historically stigmatized in mainstream media. Given the recent prominence of celebrity vegans, this article asks, how might the cultural intermediary work of vegan celebrities make the ethical practice of veganism more accessible? And how do vegans’ ethical concerns about the exploitative production and consumption of animals as food and by-products get reframed in the context of celebrity consumer culture? Bringing together philosophies of ethical veganism and eco-feminism with literature on ethical (food) consumption and celebrity culture, this article analyses the educational campaigning work on veganism by Hollywood actor, Alicia Silverstone and TV chat show host, Ellen DeGeneres. It finds that veganism is figured as a diet and lifestyle that foregrounds an ethics of care, compassion, kindness and emotion - about and for humans, animals and environment - consistent with ethical veganism. Yet these ethics are reworked through the commodity logic of celebrity culture to make it more marketable and thus consumable as a set of ideas and gendered lifestyle practices, where the individual choice is to be a healthy, happy and kind self. The tensions between ethical veganism as an intervention at the point of consumption within the production of exploitative and gendered human/animal/environmental relations, and the focus upon an individualised lifestyle politics through which celebrities maintain their commodity status, thus coalesce in the work of celebrity vegans.
... This is what the branders of the Alvar Aalto cultural route are aiming for when strengthening the brand associations between the route and the architect Alvar Aalto. Lewis (2010) examines the role and status of ordinary experts, such as Martha Stewart and Jamie Oliver, as examples of what is referred to as celebritization, and also characterizes these people and their branding as a living brand whose lifestyle expertise has become thoroughly commodified and merchandized (Lury 2004;Lewis 2010). ...
... This is what the branders of the Alvar Aalto cultural route are aiming for when strengthening the brand associations between the route and the architect Alvar Aalto. Lewis (2010) examines the role and status of ordinary experts, such as Martha Stewart and Jamie Oliver, as examples of what is referred to as celebritization, and also characterizes these people and their branding as a living brand whose lifestyle expertise has become thoroughly commodified and merchandized (Lury 2004;Lewis 2010). ...
... Aalto's reputation is undeniable, not only as the most famous Finnish architect; but also as "the most significant representative of The Other Tradition of Modern Architecture who believed strongly in realism and humanism" (Pallasmaa 2019, p. 21). Alvar Aalto was a celebrity of his time, but as his name and fame are enduring, he can be regarded as a living brand (Lewis 2010) of the current time as well. The following citation is a concrete example of a living brand. ...
Article
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The study explores how a cultural route supports the identity of a place. The study applies co-creative and identity-based place-branding theory and advances research on the significant role of culture when various actors identify with the brand of a place. Moreover, cultural sustainability is seen as a form of meta-narrative that frames the symbiosis of a place brand and its cultural values. Contributing to the previous research on branding a cultural route, this study discusses the value of a person (an architect) to the branding of a cultural route. The study also contributes to place-branding theory by linking the discourse on architectural heritage and branding an emerging cultural route. We used a single and critical case approach focusing on one of the sites representing a group of cities involved in the branding of the Alvar Aalto cultural route. Various qualitative research methods including interviews and publicly available material were utilized. The study presents empirical findings on branding an emergent cultural route. As a key theoretical contribution, the study shows how the culture and image of an individual site are expressed in the cohesive brand identity of that cultural route. Communication and co-creation are revealed to be prerequisites of efficient collaboration.
... This is what the branders of the Alvar Aalto cultural route are aiming for when strengthening the brand associations between the route and the architect Alvar Aalto. Lewis (2010) examines the role and status of ordinary experts, such as Martha Stewart and Jamie Oliver, as examples of what is referred to as celebritization, and also characterizes these people and their branding as a living brand whose lifestyle expertise has become thoroughly commodified and merchandized (Lury 2004;Lewis 2010). ...
... This is what the branders of the Alvar Aalto cultural route are aiming for when strengthening the brand associations between the route and the architect Alvar Aalto. Lewis (2010) examines the role and status of ordinary experts, such as Martha Stewart and Jamie Oliver, as examples of what is referred to as celebritization, and also characterizes these people and their branding as a living brand whose lifestyle expertise has become thoroughly commodified and merchandized (Lury 2004;Lewis 2010). ...
... Aalto's reputation is undeniable, not only as the most famous Finnish architect; but also as "the most significant representative of The Other Tradition of Modern Architecture who believed strongly in realism and humanism" (Pallasmaa 2019, p. 21). Alvar Aalto was a celebrity of his time, but as his name and fame are enduring, he can be regarded as a living brand (Lewis 2010) of the current time as well. The following citation is a concrete example of a living brand. ...
Article
Full-text available
The study explores how a cultural route supports the identity of a place. The study applies co-creative and identity-based place-branding theory and advances research on the significant role of culture when various actors identify with the brand of a place. Moreover, cultural sustainability is seen as a form of meta-narrative that frames the symbiosis of a place brand and its cultural values. Contributing to the previous research on branding a cultural route, this study discusses the value of a person (an architect) to the branding of a cultural route. The study also contributes to place-branding theory by linking the discourse on architectural heritage and branding an emerging cultural route. We used a single and critical case approach focusing on one of the sites representing a group of cities involved in the branding of the Alvar Aalto cultural route. Various qualitative research methods including interviews and publicly available material were utilized. The study presents empirical findings on branding an emergent cultural route. As a key theoretical contribution, the study shows how the culture and image of an individual site are expressed in the cohesive brand identity of that cultural route. Communication and co-creation are revealed to be prerequisites of efficient collaboration.
... The rise of food-related television [20,24] has been documented by food scholars [20,25] as well as media scholars [24,26]. From a tradition of informative programming, culinary television can now be seen as 'factual entertainment' [20]. ...
... From a tradition of informative programming, culinary television can now be seen as 'factual entertainment' [20]. The contemporary 'celebrity chef' plays a role in the transmission of cultural knowledge to viewing publics, through a position of expertise [26,27]. Literature on food television and celebrity chefs have provided a medium for examining cultural and ideological constructions of food and food practices [20], their interpretations by consumers, and the related practical implications (or lack thereof) [25]. ...
Article
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Food waste is a global issue with serious economic and environmental implications. Although a number of psychosocial and cultural factors have been identified, little attention has been paid to how food waste is culturally presented, circulated, and mediated. In this exploratory study, we consider how food waste is presented in the thriving genre of reality food television. Specifically, we conducted a content and discourse analysis of UK television programme, Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares (RKN).We found that visual and discursive references to food waste are associated with business, food, and personal incompetency in RKN. Furthermore, food handling was constructed as a moral issue. In RKN, food waste is not resolved via specific educational interventions for food waste prevention, but through attention to broader personal, business, and food incompetencies, which are value-laden and morally relevant. We discuss the symbolic dimensions of the transformation of food into food waste by drawing on Mary Douglas' ideas of matter out of place. We suggest that food waste research and behavior change could benefit from addressing personal, professional, and moral competencies which may not be directly related to food, but which mahy reduce food waste. Our analysis of food waste in a televised environment extends waste research in specific geographical locations and spatial contexts.
... In the last two decades, the roles of lifestyle experts in popular television programmes, whose aims are to teach or influence people's lifestyle choices, providing everyday expertise, are increasingly taken over by celebrity figures. These experts/celebrities, often referred to by their first names, have been characterised as 'living brands' (Lewis 2010). Such personalities, perceived as lifestyle role models, are major figures in home renovation programmes in particular. ...
... Several descriptions can be fixed with the term lifestyle: healthy, risky, sustainable, alternative etc, while it can also be attached as a characteristic of a place, for example lifestyle destinations or suburbs that are associated with a certain lifestyle(Smith 2014). The lifestyle concept is encountered in several academic disciplines, such as in literature of consumption, class and taste(Bourdieu 1984;Gram-Hanssen & Bech-Danielsen 2004;Allon 2013;Bonner 2005), citizenship(Lewis 2010(Lewis , 2008d,energy research (Gram-Hanssen 2010b; Eon, Morrison & Byrne 2017), sustainability (Barr & Gilg 2006; Partidario, Vicente & Belchior 2010), home improvement and renovation (Gabriel & Watson 2012; Rosenberg 2011a; Ryan 2014; Smith 2014; Stieß & Dunkelberg 2013) and popular media (Bonner 2005; Lewis 2011a; Rosenberg 2008; Bott 2008; Mcelroy 2017; Smith 2010).Lifestyle often signifies individuals' free choice, in order to follow or adopt certain lifestyles(Bell & Hollows 2007). However, according to Giddens, in 'conditions of high modernity', not only we follow certain lifestyles but we are forced to choose(Giddens, 1991 p.82). ...
Thesis
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Home renovation is an opportunity for decarbonising existing homes, particularly in high home ownership societies such as Australia where renovation is commonplace. Renovation is a socio-technical and emotional people-focused practice, which can take place as a one-off project and as an ongoing activity. Despite growing interest in investigating renovation in line with other everyday practices, recent literature on renovation emphasises defined periods when homes are materially reconstructed. There is limited understanding and documentation of the process before and after this window, specifically the contribution of intermediation and the significance of media in the everyday life at home. The thesis addresses this gap, by investigating the full scope of renovation practice, paying attention to the periods before and after the materially-engaged stages, to explore the significance of household media practices and intermediation in the adoption of low carbon practices. Adopting a practice-theoretical perspective and the mediatisation approach, I carry out an interdisciplinary examination of renovation, joining social research with media and cultural studies and design. I explore renovation practice and its association with homemaking, in a mediatised home environment. I map the complexity of the practice, including the non-materially engaged periods, focusing on the contribution of two different kinds of intermediation: the formal, typically short-term interactions with professionals and the informal, ongoing entanglement of people with media as texts, objects and contexts. Using a focused-ethnography and participatory methodology, I use home-tours and a workshop to bring together the actors that shape the practice. My thesis makes three contributions to renovation scholarship. The first relates to the interdisciplinary understanding of renovation as a practice that extends the materially-engaged periods, spread in five stages (Dreaming/Thinking/Planning/Performing/ Finalising or Sharing). I argue that renovation co-evolves with homemaking, in the mediatised household, and that these two practices get reproduced through common meanings of home, media technologies, emotion, and the tacit, culturally-distinct know-how of householders. This is exemplified through the ongoing Dreaming stage, which 3 connects the materially-engaged stages with the long-term period of imagining and meaning-making of ideal home in the mediatised home. The second contribution is the identification of media (as texts, objects, and contexts) as everyday informal intermediaries, who shape, incubate and accelerate the elements of renovation and homemaking, as meaning-making agents, materials and competences. I argue that the symbolic space of renovation is now global rather than local. The third contribution is the linking of formal and informal intermediation, with different household typologies and the identified renovation stages, examining how these shape low carbon practices. The complexity of the associated practices and the variation of household typologies explain why adoption of low carbon renovation is challenging. Using my stages model, I identify four formal and informal intermediation practices that can assist in the successful embedment of low carbon practices. 4
... Other brand attributes Different brand attributes have been explored in the literature in the area. Lewis (2010) examined the role and status of "ordinary experts." In Lewis' study, Martha Stewart's expertise is the attribute responsible for her influence on consumers as a human brand, with the processes of "celebritization" and branding. ...
... Conceptualization of human brands is still a key concern for researchers, partially because theory-building in this area is relatively new and, thus, there are further theoretical requirements (Erz and Christensen, 2018;Fournier and Eckhardt, 2019). Key brand principles such as positioning and brand attributes have been analyzed (Lewis, 2010;Lobpries et al., 2017). Authenticity is by far the most studied brand attribute. ...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is threefold. First, human brands are conceptualized and the distinction between them and personal brands is established. Second, human-brand research is reviewed in light of a strategic brand management framework and gaps in the knowledge that may suggest new research pathways are identified. Third, the extent to which a brand management model designed for products could be applied to human brands is explored. Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review was conducted in this study. The content analysis of the selected set of papers allowed the assessment of the state of this field of brand management and the identification of proposals for future research. Findings Substantial research exists on different aspects of human brands. However, these studies are fragmented in nature, thus highlighting the need for specific and complete human-brand management models. Research limitations/implications A limitation of this literature review is that it is based on a sample of papers collected by one specific criterion; furthermore, the way the papers were classified may be challenged. However, this study provides a comprehensive picture of studies on human brands available today. Originality/value A parsimonious distinction and connectivity between human and personal brands suggest a branding-by-individual continuum. Additionally, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first identifiable one that summarizes the growing literature on human brands, reveals important gaps in the knowledge and calls for the development of particular human-brand management models.
... The result of the analysis is summarized in Table 5: This finding agrees with previous studies which found a positive relationship between corporate visibility and corporate image (Olins 2000;Lewis 2000;Pauvit 2000;Balmer 2001, Balmer andGreyser 2003). Efforts aimed at enhancing corporate visibility correlate statistically and significantly with a positive corporate image improvement. ...
... deliberately constructed to influence the public (Olins 2000, Lewis 2000, Pauvit 2000, Balmer 2001, Balmer and Greyser 2003. The study reveals 68% of respondent perceived emotionally attached to the image of the radio stations and would readily patronize their events and programmes. ...
Article
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The study focus was to examine audience perception of corporate visibility of radio stations, and its impact on the image and credibility of radio stations in the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana. Based on quantitative approach, data was collected from 385 respondents (managers of radio stations and radio listeners), and analysed based on both descriptive and inferential statistical tests. The results revealed that most of the radio stations had in place corporate visibility strategies. Though some respondents could not attest to the link between such strategies and visibility, corporate visibility was found to influence corporate image and credibility positively and in a statistically significant relationship. The results suggest a linear dependence of corporate image and credibility on corporate visibility. The implication is that increasing and improving corporate visibility has potential to strengthen corporate image and credibility. Recommendations include the development of customer-oriented service which stresses on good corporate visibility and image-building to influence public perception and choice.
... Collins & Evans 2002;Jasanoff 2004;Rijswoud 2012). Uusia asiantuntijan statusta tavoittelevia ryhmiä ovat käytännön kokemukseen ja ammatinharjoittamiseen pohjaavat "kenttäasiantuntijat" (Setälä & Väliverronen 2014; Grundmann 2016) sekä julkisuuden kautta auktoriteettiaan rakentavat "lifestyle-asiantuntijat" (Lewis 2010). Tyypillisiä esimerkkejä näistä toimijoista ovat esimerkiksi ravintoterapeutit, kuntovalmentajat ja elämäntapavalmentajat. ...
... Mediajulkisuudesta nousseet lifestyle-asiantuntijat pyrkivät tekemään kuluttamisesta sosiaalista toimintaa, jossa kulutusvalinnat viestivät myös kuluttajan elämäntavasta ja arvoista (Lewis 2010). Nordinin voikin nähdä lifestyleasiantuntijana, joka yhdistää elämäntapaansa myymiinsä palveluihin. ...
Article
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Julkiseen keskusteluun terveydestä eivät osallistu vain lääkärit ja tieteentekijät, vaan tilaa ovat saaneet myös vaihtoehtoiset asiantuntijat. Samaan aikaan muuttuva mediaympäristö tarjoaa kuluttajille mahdollisuuksia omien näkemystensä esiin tuo- miseen. Miten verkkokeskustelijat arvioivat asiantuntijuutta ja miten nämä arviot kytkeytyvät tieteen- ja teknologiantutkimuksen kentällä käytävään keskusteluun asiantuntijuuden laajentumisesta?
... New expert groups include experience-based experts, "field experts" [Setälä and Väliverronen, 2014;Grundmann, 2017] and "lifestyle experts" [Lewis, 2010]. While not always disputing the knowledge and instructions provided by professional science-based experts, they challenge the knowledge basis and rhetoric of expertise. ...
Article
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Based on recent accounts of the sociology of expertise, we analyse the public contestation and expansion of expertise in the context of COVID-19. During the epidemic, the expertise of the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), became increasingly contested. By exploring Twitter discussions concerning the actions of THL during the first months of the epidemic from January to mid-June 2020, we analyse the main motivations and arguments in this public contestation as well as the alternative forms of expertise proposed by the critics. We focus particularly on two forms of criticism arguing for what we call networked expertise: liberal crowdsourcing supporters and data-solutionists presenting alternative epidemiological models. Abstract Public perception of science and technology; Public understanding of science and technology; Science and media Keywords https://doi.
... Instagram promueve una constante participación y actividad para conseguir mayor interacción con otros usuarios (Zulli, 2017;Stepanyan, 2019). Esta forma de comunicarse ha ido ganando terreno en las actividades de las celebridades, quienes prefieren llegar a sus fans de manera directa y sin filtros, en lugar de hacerlo a través de los medios tradicionales (Basilisco et al., 2019;Lewis, 2010). ...
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Este artículo analiza el proceso de mediatización cultural de las celebridades tomando como caso de estudio la auto-presentación en la red social Instagram de la cantante Rosalía (@rosalia.vt). Para ello se ha realizado un doble análisis cuantitativo y cualitativo de las 449 publicaciones que la cantante realiza entre el 1-1-2018 y el 31-7-2020, periodo en que alcanza fama internacional con el lanzamiento del álbum El Mal Querer. El análisis estadístico descriptivo de esta muestra permite determinar los patrones de publicación de la cantante, las categorías a las que asocia su imagen y el uso que hace de las potencialidades de esta red social. El análisis iconológico de la muestra permite determinar los referentes culturales que Rosalía asocia a su imagen, dentro de un contexto globalizado, urbano y de inspiración flamenca. Este estudio concluye que Rosalía aparece como un caso tipo de "celebritización", ya que usa estratégicamente la lógica mediática de las redes sociales como una manera de afianzar su marca personal diversificándola más allá del ámbito de la música.
... This present study's intended contribution is to connect these themes together in new ways through an analysis of the forms of language, discourse of expertise, and self-disclosures, and to indicate how these concepts can provide insight into contemporary discourses surrounding celebrity, food, and femininity. In exploring the concept of celebrity, particularly female celebrity chefs and their role as a culinary lifestyle expert, or 'ordinary expert' ( Lewis 2010), this study discusses how cookbooks play a critical role in communicating the celebrities' values demonstrated in their own lifestyle. Characteristics of women's language-qualifying statements, personal pronouns, disclosures-emerge in the narrative that enhance the appeal of the celebrity chef to their female readers. ...
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This article explores the gendered language used in female celebrity chef cookbooks. The analysis is a case study of three female celebrity chefs from the American cooking channel Food Network: Ree Drummond, Ina Garten, and Giada De Laurentiis. Relying on an interdisciplinary approach of interactional sociolinguistics, sociology, and feminism, this study identifies how the use of seemingly weak women’s language is used to enhance the celebrity chef’s appeal. Discourses of expertise, politeness strategies, and confessions build trust and rapport between the celebrity chef and the audience. This study complicates previous studies on gendered language and argues that women’s language strengthens the power and authority of female celebrity chefs as influential models of womanhood.
... Celebrity status is believed to be so powerful that celebrities can cash in on their success (Bell, 2010;Marshall, 1997), and this has drawn attention from scholars on various occasions to investigate its cultural and societal salience. While some scholars (Gamson, 1994;Turner, 2006) refer to "celebrification" to the process of one becoming a celebrity, others (Boykoff & Goodman, 2009;Lewis, 2010) prefer the term "celebrization." Although used interchangeably, these two terms are significantly different. ...
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Arguably, the advent of the Internet and, recently, social media has, to certain extent, contributed to the global quest for fame and celebritization. Fueled by advanced telecommunication technology and capitalism, the coined Internet celebrity has become a cultural phenomenon that captivates, especially, the younger generations struggling for being “liked” or “shared” in the “connected” society. By analyzing a collection of literature upon celebrity conceptualization and the related, this study aims to theoretically explore the phenomenon and the underlying social cultural influence of this new kind of capital through social construction, mostly based upon Max Weber’s fragmentary theory of the modern state, of contemporary celebritization in the modern social media era, including celebrity meaning, celebrity status, celebrity capital, and celebrity culture The parasocial interactions between Internet celebrities and their audiences lead to emerging online behaviors. In addition, the ultimate goal for future research is to investigate the impact of social media celebrity on the younger generations in consumerist society.
... Beauty and lifestyle content has a long history behind it, but its commercialization truly took off during the latter half of the 20th-century with the emergence of several celebrity experts ready to guide people's images -Nigella Lawson, Martha Stewart and Steven Sabados being some examples (Bell & Hollows, 2006;Lewis, 2010). However (initially at least), beauty and lifestyle YouTubers were explicitly not celebrities or experts; they made videos as ordinary citizens with hobby interests, taking advantage of the technologies available to them. ...
Article
This visual presentation outlines preliminary findings from a research study that focuses on the information creating activities and the informal information provider role occupied by serious YouTubers. These individuals regularly upload video content to a personal channel on the website YouTube, of which they produce most, if not all, themselves. As many serious YouTubers have gained substantial online followings, questions about the place of this increasingly influential demographic in the broader world can be raised. Through an examination of the self-presentation discourse used in the monographs of four serious beauty and lifestyle YouTubers, some implications and future research avenues are given. This visual presentation will take the form of a poster and accompanying set of public YouTube videos that will be played from a laptop, with captions, on loop.
... Closely related to modern consumption, lifestyle and identity performance, fashion blogging shares many features with lifestyle television and the celebritization of lifestyle gurus and can, in the words of Lewis, "be seen as a marker of a growing convergence between a public sphere of commodity production and spectacle, and an intimate, private sphere of consumption and ordinary, everyday life" (Lewis 2010: 581). This convergence is characterized by the increasing interconnectedness of information, entertainment, privatized lifestyle consumption and ethical modes of citizenship (Lewis 2010). ...
Chapter
Spurred by digital media logics, blogs have challenged the role of the fashion industry and its mass media portfolio of fashion magazines as authoritative intermediaries of fashion. The chapter investigates how fashion blogs as a distinct type of fashion communication are influenced by the formal and informal logics of the blog as a media technological and generic hybrid. We argue that fashion blogging, being an example of intensified digital communication, challenges the authority of fashion as an institution and transforms previously important ways of fashion communication. The chapter is based on a qualitative analysis of two Danish fashion blogs that received the Danish Fashion Blog Award in 2015 for ‘Best female fashion blog’ and ‘Best personal blog’.
... In my own work over the past decade on the evolution of lifestyle and lifestyle media, I have been similarly interested in the rise of a participatory culture in digital space, particularly in relation to sharing advice about managing everyday life or what I term 'ordinary expertise' via online platforms (Lewis, 2008(Lewis, , 2010Lewis et al., 2016). In the digital foodscape, in particular, we have seen the growing role of so-called ordinary people providing advice and demonstrating expertise in food and cooking, accompanied by an increasingly blurred line between professional and celebrity chefs and amateur cooks. ...
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This article examines the growing entanglements between the digital and the world of food while suggesting that food is a particularly generative space through which to understand the evolving but often hidden role of the digital in our everyday lives. The article starts by examining food photography on social media before discussing the role of ordinary people as participants in online food culture via video-sharing platforms such as YouTube. Mapping the shift from web 2.0’s dreams of creativity and sharing to the monetisation of digital food communities, section 3 focuses on food politics, and ‘the antinomies of connectivity’. The final section discusses big food players and their use of social media in an era of dataveillance and big data. It argues that ‘food citizens’ need to have an awareness of the commercial logics that support the communicative ecologies in which we increasingly engage with food and lifestyle practices.
... Part of this shift in relationships between the performer and audience on cooking shows is a result of a more fluid multimodal discourse of expert-friend talk. Hosts address their viewers in colloquial and informal ways (Chiaro, 2013), assume dual teacher/student roles (Davies, 2003), and act as the ''ordinary expert" (Lewis, 2010) to build solidarity with their audience. The conversational set-up is achieved through rhetorical questions (Matwick, 2016), trademark expressions (such as Martha Stewart's 'It's a good thing') (Davies, 2003, p. 149), personal language (such as Jamie Oliver's 'mockney') (Brunsdon et al., 2001, p. 39), and more. ...
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This article explores the mediated discourses of food and gender in a multimodal narrative analysis of two Food Network instructional cooking shows hosted by female protagonists. Through a discussion of the openings and closings, side-narratives and evaluations, this article shows how multimodality advances the cooking show narrative. In examining the presentation of the women cooks in the context of their homes and family, the analysis illustrates how the mediated context facilitates the transition of women from underappreciated and expected caretakers in the kitchen to confident and empowered agents.
... In such a fiercely competitive landscape, Jamie Oliver has done a remarkable job over the last two decades in carving a unique mindscape among the members of his constantly augmenting clientele. Oliver's success has been attributed repeatedly in the related scholarship to a unique combination of an authentic personality, as perceived overlap between onscreen and off-screen lives (Lewis 2010;Bennett 2011;Piper 2015). This is coupled with an adamant quest for ingredients that contribute to the performance of outstandingly gustative recipes, yet easy to prepare and packed with nutritional goodness. ...
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Amidst the constantly augmenting gastronomic capital of celebrity chefs, this study scrutinizes from a critical discourse analytic angle how Jamie Oliver has managed to carve a global brand identity through a process that is termed (dis)placed branding. A roadmap is furnished as to how Italy as place brand and Italianness are discursively articulated, (dis)placed and appropriated in Jamie Oliver’s travelogues which are reflected in his global brand identity. By enriching the CDA methodological toolbox with a deconstructive reading strategy, it is shown that Oliver’s celebrity equity ultimately boils down to supplementing the localized meaning of place of origin with a simulacral, hyperreal place of origin. In this manner, the celebrity’s recipes become more original than the original or doubly original. The (dis)placed branding process that is outlined in the face of Oliver’s global branding strategy is critically discussed with reference to the employed discursive strategies, lexicogrammatical and multimodal choices. Keywords: Jamie Oliver, place branding, celebrity branding, personal branding, critical discourse analysis, deconstruction
... 15 Furthermore, by examining the portrayal of these resisters in national media, I seek to strengthen scholarship dealing with what media studies scholar Tania Lewis has called the 'shifting ground of cultural authority'. 16 As historians of science have demonstrated, in the post-war era the relationship between trained experts and the public became more fraught. 17 Without going as far as declaring the 'death of the expert', 18 I aim to demonstrate how the mediatisation of industrialised societies resulted in a more ambiguous societal position for medical experts. ...
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In the past, advice on healthy living has often been neglected, or even openly defied. However, despite the prevalence of historical resistance against an idealised healthy lifestyle, this phenomenon has seen minimal investigation. Using eight American and Dutch newspapers, this study analyses how various ‘resisters’ found cross-border recognition from journalists for challenging existing norms about diet and exercise. It demonstrates that in the post-war era, lifestyle advice was increasingly contested in the U.S. and the Netherlands, leading to a transnational cacophony on the topic of health, and an increasingly ambiguous role for medical experts.
... Part of this shift in relationships between the performer and audience on cooking shows is a result of a more fluid multimodal discourse of expert-friend talk. Hosts address their viewers in colloquial and informal ways (Chiaro, 2013), assume dual teacher/student roles (Davies, 2003), and act as the ''ordinary expert" (Lewis, 2010) to build solidarity with their audience. The conversational set-up is achieved through rhetorical questions (Matwick, 2016), trademark expressions (such as Martha Stewart's 'It's a good thing') (Davies, 2003, p. 149), personal language (such as Jamie Oliver's 'mockney') (Brunsdon et al., 2001, p. 39), and more. ...
Article
This article explores the mediated discourses of food and gender in a multimodal narrative analysis of two Food Network instructional cooking shows hosted by female protagonists. Through a discussion of the openings and closings, side-narratives and evaluations, this article shows how multimodality advances the cooking show narrative. In examining the presentation of the women cooks in the context of their homes and family, the analysis illustrates how the mediated context facilitates the transition of women from underappreciated and expected caretakers in the kitchen to confident and empowered agents.
... In the years that followed, she would coach her own women's professional cycling team, organise a yearly leisure cycle ride for women ('Leontien Ladies Ride'), and expand her work as a public speaker and product endorser. Many of these endeavours, like those of other branded lifestyle experts, were aimed at elevating the former athlete to 'first-name fame' ('Leontien') (Lewis 2010). At the same time, her comeback story was the subject of a near-constant stream of TV and radio appearances, and was covered extensively in four biographical works published between 2002 and 2008three of which were based on interviews with Van Moorsel herself (Steman 2002, De Kort 2003, De Vries 2006, Hurkmans 2008. ...
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Celebrity athletes have become a popular source for advice on healthy living. However, little research exists on the changing representations of their interventions. This article analyses the case of Dutch top cyclist Leontien van Moorsel, whose celebrity status increased after a highly-publicised struggle with anorexia. By examining biographies, cookbooks, and radio and TV appearances, it traces Van Moorsel’s celebrification and her transformation into an experience-based expert on lifestyle, and more specifically, eating disorders. It argues that, following her ‘anorexic period’, the cyclist’s physical appearance was presented as proof of her embodied expertise on defeating anorexia. Simultaneously, through her TV appearances as a coach for girls engaged in self-starvation, Van Moorsel reveals a tension between her ‘experience’ and her ‘expertise’: her representation as a dispassionate expert on anorexia demanded that she actively distanced herself from her own life story. Hence, the case of Van Moorsel demonstrates the possible contradictions in representations of celebrity athletes’ expertise. However, it also shows that it is likely that the social field of sport will continue to offer unique possibilities for presenting celebrity athletes as experts on healthy living.
Chapter
MasterChef is a competitive cooking show, currently broadcast in over 50 countries in a format that combines features of career-oriented programmes with conventional game show procedures. The remarkable success of the franchise and its subsequent spin-offs has sparked a growing body of work on ‘the MasterChef phenomenon’, most of it dealing specifically with MasterChef Australia (e.g. Lewis 2011; Bednarek 2013). The popularity of the programme has much to do with the format. As Chalaby (2011: 294) has noted in a discussion of the TV format trade as a global industry, reality, talent and factual entertainment formats are ‘designed to create dramatic arcs and produce story lines’ where ‘the narrative arc is based on the journey that the contestant makes which, in the most dramatic cases, transforms their lives’ (emphasis in original).1 While global phenomena, however, these programmes would appear to be ultimately dependent on the audience’s identification and affirmation of aspects of the national culture and identity. Turner (2005), in a study on cultural identity, soap narrative and reality TV, shows how the Australian Big Brother gradually transformed the discourse of the original British version with its ‘expectations of conflict and sexual adventure’ and emphasis on extroversion. Turner attributes this ‘indigenization’ in part to production choices in the editing stages to focus on narrative strategies typical of Australian soap opera (‘upbeat, sunny, community oriented’), and to emphasise the soap opera’s ‘suburbanality’ in the Australian-ness of the house, with its pool, barbecue, vegetable garden and chicken coop.
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In this chapter Taylor examines Amy Poehler and Lena Dunham, celebrities who represent the mid-point between women who are famous because of their feminism and those who later chose to add feminism to their ‘brand’. For these two celebrities, feminism has always been central to their creative practice, and is thereby integral to their renown; it also clearly underpins their books, Yes Please and Not That Kind of Girl respectively. In each case, their comic blockbuster memoirs have worked to sustain their feminist celebrity in important ways but, as Taylor comprehensively demonstrates, these bestselling texts represent only one part of the equation. Accordingly, engaging with Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls website and Lena Dunham’s Lenny e-newsletter, Taylor argues that, in addition to literary works, celebrities are increasingly deploying new media to shape public conversations around feminism.
Article
DIY (do-it-yourself) craft is in the midst of a North American renaissance, and the reasons attributed to the phenomenon's meteoric rise are manifold. Thrift, conspicuous consumption, politics, environmental activism, nostalgia, individuality, community: each in turn has been cited as the driving force behind handicraft's recent blossoming. In this dissertation I examine the work of professional and semi-professional crafters through an alternative explanatory lens, one that is noticeably absent from academic investigations of DIY and underutilized in the scholarship on creative work at large: the rhetoric of pleasure. Through an examination of in-depth interviews with Etsy sellers and DIY bloggers, textual analysis of promotional materials from individual crafters and from Etsy.com, and participant observation at indie craft fairs and local knitting groups, I trace pleasure's effect on the chronology of commercial handicraft. First, drawing on Roland Barthes's distinction between jouissance and plaisir, as well as Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi's concept of "flow," I argue that the pleasure crafters derive from the act of making DIY is itself bifurcated, at once concretizing and destabilizing their sense of self. I then direct my attention to the handcrafted object's sale, maintaining that both jouissance and plaisir are folded into the professional crafters' marketing narratives to build their personal brands and signal their creative authenticity. Finally I consider interactions between individuals in the craft community and the nature of the Etsy exchange, suggesting that commercial handicraft functions simultaneously as gift and commodity. However the primacy of pleasure throughout the sale of DIY obscures the challenges that creative entrepreneurship engenders. But in considering these oft unrecognized hardships--the loneliness and isolation; the endless administrative burdens; the pressures of a saturated marketplace--it becomes clear that there is a deep-seated irony at work: the more successful a maker becomes and the bigger her business grows, the farther away she moves from personally experiencing jouissance. I conclude by arguing that this paradox is emblematic of neoliberal creative work at large and points to the limits of the creative class thesis. I suggest that the surest path to the pleasures of creative production might in fact lie outside its professionalization.
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to unpack an Asian-born celebrity culture in which celebrities become everyday necessities for global consumers’ identity struggle, prototypes for global branding strategy, contents for the media industry, and agents for sociocultural transformation. Design/methodology/approach In order to better elucidate such a significant phenomenon, the authors also introduce two mostly palpable and more relevant domains of celebrity culture to global consumer culture literature − politics of aesthetics and memetics − as analytical tools. Observations and publicly available narratives are also incorporated to enhance the review and critique of the global celebrification process. Psy’s Gangnam Style (GS) is chosen as an archetype, due to its exceptionally vulgar but highly replicable nature. Findings The specific case of GS exposes three unique qualities of kitsch − exaggeration, disconcertment, and subversive sensibility − that are substantially commensurate with prototypical characteristics of globalized online memes − ordinariness, flawed masculinity, theatricality, and ludic agency. Polysemy and optimism also facilitate the celebrification process in global participatory culture. Research limitations/implications The “radical intertextuality” of online memes sustains the participatory culture in which kitsch becomes a global icon through a reproductive process. Korean popular culture cultivates reverse cosmopolitanism through a nationalistic self-orientalization strategy that paradoxically indigenizes western pop-culture and transforms power relations in global pop culture. Originality/value This paper presents further elaboration of current discourses on global-celebrity culture by incorporating popular concepts and practices, such as kitsch, meme, parody, and sharing, which synergistically advance aesthetic liberation on a global scale.
Article
Why is it that some film directors become and remain central in the reception of their works and others do not? Classical auteur theory suggests the answer lies in the personality of the director. In this article, we explore and re-conceptualize the status of auteur du cinema Ingmar Bergman, Swedish film director. In line with Dyer’s gap between the institution and the audience, we explore Bergman’s self-fashioning through his own published writings and compare this to what was written about him in the Swedish press between 1944 and 1983, his most active years as a film director. The result is an analysis of dominant and alternative cultural discourses concerning Bergman’s authorship that facilitates an exploration into the corresponding interpretative strategies located in the audience. Here, Bergman’s status as popular celebrity in Sweden contributes to a paradoxical image – and recognition – of the high-art auteur, not in the least through his own myth-making.
Article
Podcasts cover a wide range of topics and genres that can be created and developed for diverse and niche audiences. Using an inductive approach, we explore the connections and insights the podcast Anything for Selena offers about parasociality, celebrity grieving, and diasporic Latina/o/x identity, in the context of Selena as a brand. Themes follow acts of performing culture, posthumous branding, aspirational identity, and parasocial grieving across traditional and new digital media. A focus on multilingual and multicultural Latina/o/x identity revealed narrative nuances specific to the target audience. Selena’s crossover appeal, augmented by engaged niche groups in podcast communities, remains relevant for the 2020s and beyond.
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Suomalaisten ruokasuhdetta määrittävät valintojen välttämättömyys runsauden keskellä ja pyrkimykset asettaa rajoituksia syömiselle. Teollisesti valmistettuihin ruokiin liittyy lupaus vaivattomasta elämästä, mutta samalla osa kuluttajista moittii niitä mauttomiksi ja epäterveellisiksi. Itse tekemistä arvostetaan ja pienimuotoista tuotantoa pidetään teollista ”aidompana” ja ”puhtaampana”. Myös terveyden ja nau- tinnollisuuden välinen jännite on vahva. Yhtäältä pitäisi välttää liiallista itsekontrollia, joka voi riistäytyä syömishäiriöksi. Toisaalta mässäilyn vaaroina ovat terveysriskit. Samalla kun mainonta ja markkinointi kannustavat huolettomaan kuluttamiseen ja itsensä hemmotteluun, ympäristö- ja eläinsuojelujärjestöt toivovat kansalaisten syövän vastuullisesti. Kuluttajien ongelmana on ruokaan liittyvien odotusten yhteensovittaminen. Terveydenhuollon toimijoiden haasteena puolestaan on sovittaa yhteen tiede- perustainen viesti terveellisestä ruokavaliosta ja asiakkaiden muut syömiseen kohdistuvat toiveet.
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This chapter focuses on the current ubiquity of the “life expert” on television and the increasingly central role and status popular media figures have as cultural authorities within public and political life today. It analyzes the proliferation of experts on television, drawing upon a broad range of examples of reality shows but focusing in particular on that subgenre of reality television concerned with optimizing and transforming one's lifestyle. The chapter then goes on to place the rise of the reality television expert in the context of the specific dilemmas and concerns of late modernity. It presents a range of conceptual frameworks for understanding the regimes of living and selfhood promoted by reality-television-based experts - from gender and class to neoliberal individualization to cosmopolitan models of transnational consumption, citizenship, and taste. The chapter also draws on a variety of examples of programming and figures of expertise.
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This chapter shows how television cooking shows operate as platforms for the production of celebrity food brands and food businesses. Through case studies of British celebrity chefs Jamie Oliver and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Phillipov demonstrates how the conventions of their food television programmes (including Jamie’s School Dinners, Jamie’s Food Revolution and River Cottage) are crucial to the success of their extra-textual food brands and businesses. In the case of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, the idyllic experiences depicted on River Cottage mirror what audiences can experience at the River Cottage HQ tourist site. In the case of Jamie Oliver, his range of Jamie Oliver branded food products capitalise on his reputation for healthy eating and lifestyle cookery established through his food television programmes.
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An overview of the rise of popular food media and its relationship to ‘alternative’ food politics, the Introduction shows how the contemporary food media landscape is being shaped by new relationships and alliances between media and food industries. Phillipov argues that food media is now so central to the expression of popular food politics that it plays a key role in shaping media and food industry practices. She shows how this is giving rise to a new politics of food, in which the powerful affordances of food media’s mainstream ‘reach’ are being deployed both by those with a genuine, activist commitment to a progressive food politics and by large corporations subject to criticism for their questionable food ethics.
Thesis
The research question of this thesis is what is the role of media and celebrities in the rise of a marginalised form of consumption. This question is explored through the rise of sustainable consumption and particularly veganism through different theoretical lenses, from a structural point of view. Through media analysis, the first essay uncovers the role of the media institution in explaining the status of sustainable consumption. The second essay focuses on the symbiotic role of media and celebrities in the destigmatisation of veganism in British media, and relates the development to wider ideologies. Based on these essays, the thesis builds a framework explaining why media and celebrities have contributed to this change. Conversely, the last two essays explore the process by which this change has happened. The third essay analyses co-optation of veganism in British media. The paper develops a novel stage model of co-optation which highlights the two-fold role of celebrities in the process. Finally, the fourth essay explores the role of media meta-capital in the rise of veganism using Bourdieu’s field theory. Based on these essays the thesis develops a Bourdieusian framework of how media and celebrities contribute to the rise of veganism.
Book
Celebrity introduces the key terms and concepts, dilemmas and issues that are central to the study and critical understanding of celebrity. Drawing on two dynamic models from two different modes of enquiry - the circuit of celebrity culture and the circuit of celebrity affect - this book explores the multi-layered, multi-faceted contexts and concepts that sit within and surround the study of celebrity. Through building a critical story about celebrity, Sean Redmond discusses key topics such as identity and representation; the celebrity body; the consumption of celebrity and celebrity culture; and the sensory connection between fans and celebrities, gender, activism, gossip and toxicity.Including case studies on Miley Cyrus, David Bowie, Scarlett Johansson and Kate Winslet, Celebrity is a dynamic and topical volume ideal for students and academics in celebrity and cultural studies.
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In 1968, Weight Watchers International introduced behavior modification practices to their established commercial program. At the time, the addition of behavioral psychology gave Weight Watchers a distinct advantage over the many competing weight control groups in postwar America. The process of combining group therapy with a controlled diet plan, behavior techniques and later, exercise, has significantly influenced American popular culture. This article considers how the commercialization of group weight control impacted the development and dissemination of a new multidimensional approach for weight management and how this has shaped popular ideas associated with dieting and wider understandings of healthy living.
Article
The popularization of wine drinking was one of the most significant changes in British drinking culture in the twentieth century, in terms of the increase in both the availability and acceptability of wine for the general population. Based on a discourse analysis of 35 years of Jane MacQuitty’s Saturday Times Wine Column (1982–2017), this paper argues that while wine has been discursively constructed as a drink of the many, the distinction traditionally associated with wine drinking in Britain remains. The data demonstrate how MacQuitty constructs wine through the media stylistically as everybody’s drink, while also constructing and maintaining a distinction between “us” as an in-group whose wine knowledge and taste are distinct from “them.”
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Žižek Studies: The Greatest Hits (So Far) assembles and presents the best work published in the field of Žižek Studies over the last ten years, providing teachers, students, and researchers with a carefully curated volume of leading-edge scholarship addressing the unique and sometimes eclectic work of Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic Slavoj Žižek. The chapters included in this collection have been rigorously tested in and culled from the (virtual) pages of the International Journal of Žižek Studies, a leading open access journal that began publication in 2007. The original paper was published in International Journal of Žižek Studies in 2015 under the same title 'The Joy of Inequality: The Libidinal Economy of Compassionate Consumerism'.
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Digital foodscapes not only transform our everyday relationships with food but offer creative and entrepreneurial opportunities. This paper works to expand the Anglo-American focus of digital foodscapes scholarship in analysis of Japanese Instagram food influencers and their relationship to gendered social reproduction. Japan’s most prominent influencers are mothers documenting the bentos (boxed lunches) they prepare for their children, a meal suffused with socio-cultural meaning about good food and good mothering. I develop the concept of precarious digital mothering to examine the hidden, gendered labor created and magnified through Instagram bento accounts. I argue that the creative and entrepreneurial opportunities offered to women though Instagram are inseparable from the cultural meaning of bento as a judgment on good mothering and create a bind where digital success cannot occur without taking on additional domestic food work. Precarity is created both for the mothers who take on unpaid and unrecognized labor in the pursuit of Instagram success, and those who consume their content and the problematic narratives of food and motherhood it normalizes in its idealized and mediated performance.
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On 27 August 2013, Australian commercial broadcaster Network Ten screened a new reality show, Recipe to Riches, in a primetime slot. Based on a Canadian format of the same name, the show sees contestants — ordinary people with no formal training or food credentials — competing for the prize of having their homemade recipes recognised as worthy of being top-selling supermarket products. This chapter discusses the Australian version of this somewhat unusual reality show, situating the rise of the format in the broader contexts of the increasing politicisation and scrutiny of food production and provenance as well as the role of agribusiness and supermarket players in Australia and internationally. Reality-based food shows like MasterChef Australia (Network Ten 2009-) have proved to be highly successful commercial ventures, integrating ‘below-the-line’ advertising and commodities seamlessly into their format structure and content. Sponsored by major Australian supermarket chain, Woolworths, Recipe to Riches takes this commercial logic considerably further. Turning the recipes of ordinary Australians into mass products through a large-scale ‘batch up’ process in a (purportedly) commercial kitchen, the show’s narrative involves developing a branding strategy and a product launch, finally resulting in its temporary placement on Woolworth’s shelves, at which point viewers get to vote for their favourite product by buying it in-store or online.
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This article examines the representation of men as domestic experts in the lifestyle genre on British primetime TV. This is contextualized in relation to changing representations of the home as a space for the stylish individual and to changes in British primetime programming, where a movement towards hybrid TV forms appears to rearticulate the mission to ‘inform, educate and entertain’ and to transform private matters into public spectacle. The article aims to examine the ways in which contemporary representations of the male domestic expert struggle to negotiate perceived boundaries between the ‘inside’ of private space and the ‘outside’ of the public sphere and between the categories of femininity and masculinity, a struggle that is evident across the lifestyle genre and within individual programmes, such as BBC2’s Home Front. In Home Front, aestheticism and camp become key strategies for the redefinition of the home and masculinity as matters of lifestyle.
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1. Introduction 2. How should one do the history of 'the self'? 3. A critical history of psychology 4. Psychology as a 'social' science 5. Expertise and the 'techne' of psychology 6. Psychology as an 'individualizing' technology 7. Social psychology as a science of democracy 8. Governing enterprising individuals 9. Assembling ourselves 10. Notes 11. Bibliography.
Book
Drawing on rich empirical material, this revealing book builds up a critical theory, arguing that brands have become an important tool for transforming everyday life into economic value. When branding lifestyles or value complexes onto their products, companies assume that consumers desire products for their ability to give meaning to their lives. Yet, brands also have a key function within managerial strategy. Examining the history of audience and market research, marketing thought and advertising strategy; the first part of this book traces the historical development of branding, whilst the second part evaluates new media, contemporary management and overall media economics to present the first systematic theory of brands: the brand as a key institution in information capitalism. It includes chapters on: Consumption. Marketing. Brand management. Online branding. The brand as informational capital. Richly illustrated with case studies from market research, advertising, shop displays, mobile phones, the internet and virtual companies, this outstanding book is essential reading for students and researchers of the sociology of media, cultural studies, advertising and consumer studies and marketing.
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Despite the explosion of interest in cooking, there has been little research into the meanings that men bring to their cooking practices. This article examines how a mode of domestic masculinity is negotiated in Jamie Oliver's television shows and cookbooks. Drawing on Marjorie DeVault's work, in which she argues that cooking is a way in which women construct themselves as `recognizably womanly', the article argues that in The Naked Chef cooking is constructed as `recognizably manly' through association with `recognizable masculinities'. The construction of the masculine domestic cook involves disavowing the extent to which cooking is a form of labour and constructing it as a `fun' leisure and lifestyle activity. The article draws on Bourdieu's work to suggest that the ability to experience cooking as leisure is dependent on a distance from both economic and temporal constraints, a position that is both classed and gendered.
Article
■ This article attributes the popularity of lifestyle to the contemporary shift from civic to consumer culture. At the local level, `lifestyle' is replacing the traditional `way of life'. The media, culture and leisure industries have a vested economic interest in encouraging the transition to lifestyle — hence the increased popularity of lifestyle programming in British primetime television. Since the mid-1990s, however, garden lifestyle media products have multiplied alongside a concomitant growth in consumer spending on garden merchandise. This article analyses the `ordinari-ization' strategies garden lifestyle programmes use to urge ordinary gardeners to invest in lifestyle projects. Viewers witness the embrace of more ordinary subjects and garden experts are `personalityinterpreters', translating lifestyle ideas from the symbolic repertoires offered by consumer culture. ■
Article
If we are to understand series such as the first U.K. version of Big Brother as events, rather than just as texts or production processes, we need to draw on anthropological theory, for example, Dayan and Katz's theory of media events. This article develops an anthropologically informed argument about the status of Big Brother as event, its ambiguous claims to present social “reality,” and the connection of those claims with its other claim to offer “liveness” in a new web-enhanced form. These ambiguities can be traced not only in the discourse of the program but also in the discourses by producers and others that surrounded it, ambiguities that are ideological in the same way that “myth” was for Roland Barthes.
Article
This paper discusses the way in which popular media culture has been marked by a growing concern with questions of civic responsibility and citizenship particularly in relation to the impact of contemporary lifestyles and consumption on the environment.
Article
In-depth interviews with 10 women who are Martha Stewart fans addressed the roles Stewart and her media products play in their lives and why and how they use her media products. Stewart and her media products appear to play 3 main roles in the lives of these women: They encourage the fantasy of an upper-class lifestyle of elegance and luxury while providing an escape from their daily lives; they validate the women's interest in domesticity by making domestic work respectable and seem important; and they foster creativity and feelings of accomplishment and pride among those who complete projects and recipes. In addition, the women were able to use Stewart's media products flexibly to fit individual schedules, budgets, tastes, and desires. This paper argues that the domestic fantasy of class mobility privileges appearance over substance and substitutes the look of luxury for the unattainable class ascension. However, rather than condemning fans for embracing this fantasy, it is necessary to understand the pleasures provided and desires met by Stewart's media products, as well as the contradictions in the lives of Stewart's fans.
Book
Simultaneously celebrated and denigrated, celebrities represent not only the embodiment of success, but also the ultimate construction of false value. Celebrity and Power questions the impulse to become embroiled with the construction and collapse of the famous, exploring the concept of the new public intimacy: A product of social media in which celebrities from Lady Gaga to Barack Obama are expected to continuously campaign for audiences in new ways. In a new Introduction for this edition, P. David Marshall investigates the viewing public’s desire to associate with celebrity and addresses the explosion of instant access to celebrity culture, bringing famous people and their admirers closer than ever before. © 2014 by the Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
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‘Graeme Turner is one of the leading figures in cultural studies today. When his gaze turns to celebrity, the result is a readable and compelling account of this most perplexing and infuriating of modern phenomena. Read on!’ – Toby Miller, New York University We cannot escape celebrity culture: it is everywhere. So just what is the cultural function of celebrity? This is the first comprehensive overview of the production and consumption of celebrity from within cultural and media studies. The pervasive influence of contemporary celebrity, and the cultures it produces, has been widely noticed. Earlier studies, though, have tended to focus on the consumption of celebrity or on particular locations of celebrity – Hollywood, or the sports industries for instance. This book presents a broad survey across all media as well as a new synthesis of theoretical positions, that will be welcomed by all students of media and cultural studies. Among its attributes are the following: It provides an overview and evaluation of the key debates surrounding the definition of celebrity, its history, and its social and cultural function; It examines the ‘celebrity industries’: the PR and publicity structures that manufacture celebrity; It looks at the cultural processes through which celebrity is consumed; It draws examples from the full range of contemporary media – film, television, newspapers, magazines and the web.
Article
Brands are everywhere: in the air, on the high-street, in the kitchen, on television and, maybe even on your feet. But what are they? The brand, that point of connection between company and consumer, has become one of the key cultural forces of our time and one of the most important vehicles of globalization. This book offers a detailed and innovative analysis of the brand. Illustrated with many examples, the book argues that brands: mediate the supply and demand of products and services in a global economy, frame the activities of the market by functioning as an interface, communicate interactively, selectively promoting and inhibiting communication between producers and consumers, operate as a public currency while being legally protected as private property in law, introduce sensation, qualities and affect into the quantitative calculations of the market, organize the logics of global flows of products, people, images and events. This book will be essential reading for students of sociology, cultural studies and consumption.
Comeback queen: Martha Stewart's next lifestyle launch', The GuardianPlaying for Celebrity: Big Brother as Ritual Event
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Brady, S. (2006) The Martha Factor, Ottawa, Citizen. Burkeman, O. (2006) 'Comeback queen: Martha Stewart's next lifestyle launch', The Guardian, 2 May, p. 14. Corner, J. & Pels, D. (2003) Media and the Restyling of Politics: Consumerism, Celebrity, Cynicism, London, Sage. Couldry, N. (2002) 'Playing for Celebrity: Big Brother as Ritual Event', Television & New Media, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 283Á293.
Everywoman.com: getting out of the house with Martha Stewart', The New Yorker
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Didion, J. (2000) 'Everywoman.com: getting out of the house with Martha Stewart', The New Yorker, 21 February.
Understanding Media: Inside Celebrity
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Evans, J. & Hesmondhalgh, D. (2005) Understanding Media: Inside Celebrity, Maidenhead, Open University Press in association with The Open University.
Undoing Culture: Globalization, Postmodernism and Identity
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Featherstone, M. (1995) Undoing Culture: Globalization, Postmodernism and Identity, London, Sage Publications. Forbes (2007) Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling and Martha Stewart Top Forbes' First-Ever List of the 20 Richest Women in Entertainment, New York, Forbes.
Oliver's Twist: leisure, labour and domestic masculinity in The Naked Chef Jamie Oliver and Richard and Judy Top Mother's Day pol
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Hollows, J. (2003) 'Oliver's Twist: leisure, labour and domestic masculinity in The Naked Chef', International Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 6, pp. 229Á248. Home-Start (2006) Jamie Oliver and Richard and Judy Top Mother's Day pol, Leicester, Home-Start.
‘“Kmartha” to the rescue?’ BusinessWeek Online
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Martha Stewart brand faces uphill battle’ Reuters News
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