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Healing With Bach(R) Flower Essences: Testing a Complementary Therapy

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Abstract

Bach® Original Flower Essence (BFE) Rescue® Remedy, a modality used since 1930 but not yet thoroughly investigated scientifically, was evaluated for the reduction of acute situational stress. A double-blind clinical trial comparing a standard dosage of BFE Rescue Remedy against a placebo of identical appearance was conducted in a sample of 111 individuals aged 18 to 49, randomized into treatment (n = 53) and control (n = 58) groups. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was administered before and after the use of Rescue Remedy or placebo. Downward trends in anxiety level measurements were discovered in both the treatment (Rescue Remedy) and control (placebo) groups. Statistical analyses indicated that only the high-state anxiety treatment subgroup demonstrated a statistically significant difference between pretest and posttest scores. The results suggest that BFE Rescue Remedy may be effective in reducing high levels of situational anxiety.
... 15 Bach flower remedies are designed to holistically treat the individual by restoring emotional balance. 14,16 There is some evidence that Bach flower remedies can help reduce acute situational stress in individuals with high degrees of anxiety. 16 Turmeric is an herb that was prescribed for its antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, as it can protect against oxidative damage and the formation of cells that can promote inflammation. ...
... 14,16 There is some evidence that Bach flower remedies can help reduce acute situational stress in individuals with high degrees of anxiety. 16 Turmeric is an herb that was prescribed for its antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, as it can protect against oxidative damage and the formation of cells that can promote inflammation. 17,18 Echinacea was prescribed for its immune-modulating properties, as well as for its anti-inflammatory properties. ...
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Introduction: Women with breast implants may experience breast implant illness (BII). BII is comprised of a collection of systemic symptoms, such as fatigue and pain, that are postulated to be related to having breast implants. Case presentation: This case report documents the naturopathic treatment of a 35-year-old female patient diagnosed with fibromyalgia, tension headaches, and chronic anxiety, perceived to be linked to and exacerbated by her textured cohesive gel implants. The patient sought naturopathic treatment for support during the explant process of her breast implants.Naturopathic treatment was provided over a 3-month period in conjunction with prescribed medication for her anxiety and tension headaches. Conclusion: At 3 months post-naturopathic treatment, the patient experienced a reduction in anxiety, fatigue, and self-reported pain. The integration of alternative therapies with prescribed pharmaceutical treatment appeared to positively impact the health of this patient.
... Edward Bach believed that illness was the result of a conflict between the purposes of the soul and the personality's actions and outlook. Our souls are coming here to learn and evolve and the physical decease is a result of disharmony between our real purpose that is spiritual and our actions in this world that might not lead to the evolution of the soul (Halberstein, DeSantis, Sirkin, Padron-Fajardo & Ojeda-Vaz 2007). ...
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Spiritual science tries to merge science and religion. The humankind is always evolving and what was called before religion becomes science in modern times. The Gospel of Thomas, written in the second century teaches that salvation is through the words of Jesus and not through his death and resurrection which are never mentioned. The gospel does not contain cross, suffering, healing, miracle stories or exorcisms. The gospel teaches that salvation comes from the perfection of the individual. The article gives an interpretation to the Gospel of Thomas from the Spiritual Science perspective that empowers the individual as capable of understanding his true nature and relationship with the creation. The gospel reconciliates Christianity with Buddhism as it teaches that reaching enlightenment is the only way to escape the material world.
... However, the authors reported a significant reduction in anxiety in students with high levels of anxiety at the baseline. [16] Rescue remedy was recommended for children as a preventive measure before a dental or medical appointment, a surgery, or examination. [17] A systematic review by Thaler et al. concluded that available evidence failed to show efficacy of Bach flower remedies over placebo in reducing pain and anxiety in adults. ...
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Background: Dental anxiety is a primary cause of missed dental appointments, delayed treatment, and untreated dental caries in children. Alternative techniques such as music therapy (MT) and Bach flower therapy (BFT) have potential to reduce anxiety. Lack of randomized controlled studies evaluating effectiveness of these methods in reducing dental anxiety led us to this study. Aim: To compare the effectiveness of BFT and MT on reduction of dental anxiety in pediatric patients. Materials and methods: A total of 120 children (aged 4-6 years) were selected and randomly allocated to three groups: BFT, MT, and control. All children received oral prophylaxis and fluoride treatment. Dental anxiety was evaluated using North Carolina Behavior Rating Scale, Facial Image Scale (FIS), and physiological parameters. Results: Significantly better behavior was seen in children from the BFT group as compared to the control group (P = 0.014). FIS scores measured postoperatively did not show significant differences among the groups. Children from the BFT and MT groups showed a significant decrease in the pulse rates intraoperatively from the preoperative period. Intraoperative systolic blood pressure in children from the MT group was significantly lower than both the BFT and the control groups. Diastolic blood pressure significantly increased in the control group intraoperatively, whereas other groups showed a decrease. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate significant effects of both single dose of BFT and exposure to MT, on reduction of dental anxiety in children aged between 4 and 6 years.
... O primeiro assunto abordado, presente em 33,3% da amostra, (02) Remedy ( que é a formação de cinco flores: Impatiens, Clematis, Star of bethelehem, cherry Plum e Rock Rose) mostrou significativa redução da ansiedade somente em indivíduos que apresentavam altos níveis de ansiedade (Halberstein R, 2007). ...
... Alguns estudos mostram bons resultados da terapia floral como, por exemplo, uma pesquisa com terapia floral e placebo, em que ambos os grupos apresentaram tendências descendentes nos indicadores de nível de ansiedade durante o teste (15) . Em outra pesquisa a intervenção com a terapia floral também diminuiu a ansiedade em indivíduos que se submeteram a este tratamento (8) . ...
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Objective: To understand the experience from the perspective of the participant of a clinical research, which had as intervention the flower therapy for anxiety of individuals with overweight and obesity. Method: qualitative study, developed by semi-structured interview with 42 participants from a clinical research and data submitted to content analysis. Results: after analysis, five thematic categories emerged: seeking natural alternatives to aid in control of anxiety and obesity; perceiving the benefits of flower therapy in itself and in family and professional relationships; recognizing flower therapy as source of tranquility and self-knowledge; perceiving changes in sleep quality; acquiring self-control and guidance on food and relational needs. Final considerations: the participants showed the intention of seeking natural alternatives to aid the control of anxiety and obesity, employing complementary therapies to strengthen their health. Consequently, participants reported self-control in feeding and in family and professional relationships.
... It can even rewire the brain, making you more vulnerable to everyday pressures and problems." [20] Traditional Chinese Medicinal herbs may also be prescribed depending on the overall health condition of the patient and the availability of the herbs on site or nearby the clinic, hospital or private practice rooms. ...
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SUMMARY/ABSTRACT: Violent extremist groups are using all methods possible to wage a successful long term campaign using children. These groups infiltrate existing systems, threaten and radicalize important players, use extreme forms of violence to attack those they perceive as non-compliant. No foundation of society is off limits be it: hospitals, schools, religious organizations, legal institutions, law enforcement, orphanages, charities, sports, businesses, transportation, recreation or communication sites. Every means is justified for their stated aim of a worldwide Islamic caliphate under Sharia law. The scope of this phenomenon has increased in the past decade, however the methods implemented were developed and refined during and after World War II. No child is left behind if they can be exploited.
... Finally, it is necessary to recognize the importance of healing as much as curing." [15] All the treatments mentioned may be expanded upon with more research, observation and implementation. Those who are already trained and skilled TCM practitioners can work together with western medicine trained practitioners to offer patients a range of healing strategies and treatments. ...
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Background: the preclinical studies that in their habitual form precede the use of a conventional drug, could become a solution to testing therapeutic actions of natural medications such as the Bach flowers. The acute inflammation and the experimental models that simulate it are very useful tools in this direction. Objective: to evaluate the antinflammatory activity of the Bach flower essence in an acute inflammation model in rats. Methods: a pilot experimental preclinical study, controlled and blindly randomized, was carried out at the UTEX of the Medical Sciences University of Villa Clara on December 2010. The experimental model consisted on the induction of plantar oedema with Dextran. 5 groups of 6 animals were formed (30 rats in total). They were treated with Beech and Vervain essences and Rescue Remedy respectively; while the remaining 2 formed the control group (negative with placebo and positive with Diphenhydramine). Results: different effects in the treatments were observed. Beech and Vervain showed antinflammatory properties with significant differences form placebo, condition that endorse their use in the treatment of pathologies where inflammation is a common factor. These actions were selective because Beech had an immediate effect and Vervain showed its activity on the inflammation in the third hour. Other preparation, the Rescue Remedy, showed that its activity was not different from placebo.
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An analysis of the control groups in double-blind trials of medicines demonstrates broad variation--from 0 to 100 percent--in placebo effectiveness rates for the same treatment for the same condition. In two cases considered here, drug healing rates covary with placebo healing rates; placebo healing is the ultimate and inescapable "complementary medicine." Several factors can account for the dramatic variation in placebo healing rates, including cultural ones. But because variation differs by illness, large placebo effects for one condition do not necessarily anticipate large placebo effects for other conditions as well. Deeper understanding of the intimate relationship between cultural and biological processes will require close ethnographic scrutiny of the meaningfulness of medical treatment in different societies.
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Bach-flower remedies are a type of alternative medication used increasingly for over-the-counter self-help purposes. We studied the efficacy of a combination of Bach-flower remedies in subjects with test anxiety in a randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded parallel group design, with crossing over the placebo group to remedies after the first phase. Anxiety was measured by a standardized, validated test anxiety questionnaire (the German version of the Test Anxiety Inventory, TAI-G). Fifty-five of 61 subjects with self-reported test anxiety gave valid data. There was no significant difference between the groups, but a significant decrease of test anxiety in all groups was present. We conclude that Bach-flower remedies are an effective placebo for test anxiety and do not have a specific effect.
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To evaluate the effects on blood pressure, lipid profile, and anxiety status on subjects received a 12-week Tai Chi Chuan exercise program. Randomized controlled study of a Tai Chi Chuan group and a group of sedentary life controls. Taipei Medical University Hospitals and University campus in the Taipei, Taiwan, area. Two (2) selected groups of 76 healthy subjects with blood pressure at high-normal or stage I hypertension. A 12-week Tai Chi Chuan exercise training program was practiced regularly with a frequency of 3 times per week. Each session included 10-minute warm-up, 30-minute Tai Chi exercise, 10-minute cool-down. Exercise intensity was estimated to be approximately 64% of maximal heart rate. Blood pressure, lipid profile and anxiety status (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; STAI) were evaluated. After 12-weeks of Tai Chi training, the treatment group showed significant decrease in systolic blood pressure of 15.6 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure 8.8 mm Hg. The serum total cholesterol level decreased 15.2 mg/dL and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased 4.7 mg/dL. By using STAI evaluation, both trait anxiety and state anxiety were decreased. This study shows that under well-designed conditions, Tai Chi exercise training could decrease blood pressure and results in favorable lipid profile changes and improve subjects' anxiety status. Therefore, Tai Chi could be used as an alternative modality in treating patients with mild hypertension, with a promising economic effect.
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This report presents selected estimates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among U.S. adults, using data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Data for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population were collected using computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). This report is based on 31,044 interviews of adults age 18 years and over. Statistics shown in this report were age adjusted to the year 2000 U.S. standard population. Sixty-two percent of adults used some form of CAM therapy during the past 12 months when the definition of CAM therapy included prayer specifically for health reasons. When prayer specifically for health reasons was excluded from the definition, 36% of adults used some form of CAM therapy during the past 12 months. The 10 most commonly used CAM therapies during the past 12 months were use of prayer specifically for one's own health (43.0%), prayer by others for one's own health (24.4%), natural products (18.9%), deep breathing exercises (11.6%), participation in prayer group for one's own health (9.6%), meditation (7.6%), chiropractic care (7.5%), yoga (5.1%), massage (5.0%), and diet-based therapies (3.5%). Use of CAM varies by sex, race, geographic region, health insurance status, use of cigarettes or alcohol, and hospitalization. CAM was most often used to treat back pain or back problems, head or chest colds, neck pain or neck problems, joint pain or stiffness, and anxiety or depression. Adults age 18 years or over who used CAM were more likely to do so because they believed that CAM combined with conventional medical treatments would help (54.9%) and/or they thought it would be interesting to try (50.1%). Most adults who have ever used CAM have used it within the past 12 months, although there is variation by CAM therapy.
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