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A New Species of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) from Chapada dos Veadeiros (Central Brazil)

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A new species, , from the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) is described and illustrated. This species was found growing at the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, and is distinguished from the other species in the genus by the presence of several rudimentary (or dormant) floral buds, sessile glands in the peduncle, and highly congested inflorescence. is here considered a member of section and is morphologically similar to and A key of the species inhabiting the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park is provided. Portuguese Uma nova espécie, Utricularia densiflora do Cerrado brasileiro é descrita e ilustrada. Essa espécie foi encontrada no Parque Nacional da Chapada dos Veadeiros. Distingue-se das demais espécies do gênero pela presença de muitos botões florais rudimentares (ou dormentes), glândulas sésseis no pedúnculo e inflorescência altamente congesta. Utricularia densiflora é aqui considerada membro da seção Oligocista e morfologicamente semelhante à U. erectiflora e U. meyeri. É disponibilizada uma chave de identificação das espécies ocorrentes no Parque Nacional da Chapada dos Veadeiros.
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A New Species of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) from Chapada dos Veadeiros
(Central Brazil)
Author(s): Paulo Cesar Baleeiro Souza and Claudia Petean Bove
Source: Systematic Botany, 36(2):465-469. 2011.
Published By: The American Society of Plant Taxonomists
URL: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1600/036364411X569642
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Systematic Botany (2011), 36(2): pp. 465–469
© Copyright 2011 by the American Society of Plant Taxonomists
DOI 10.1600/036364411X569642
465
Utricularia L. is the largest genus of Lentibulariaceae and all
carnivorous plants, with species distributed worldwide and
diversified in tropical regions ( Taylor 1989 ; Jobson et al. 2003 ;
Müller and Borsch 2005 ; Guisande et al. 2007 ). According to
the Brazilian species list of Lentibulariaceae undertaken by
Miranda and Rivadavia (2010) , Utricularia is represented by
67 species, distributed among various biomes, ca. 48 species
occurring in the Brazilian Cerrado vegetation. Since Taylor’s
monograph (1989) , a single new species, U. cochleata C. P.
Bove, has been described for this domain ( Bove 2008 ). The
Cerrado is a hotspot for conservation due to its great biologi-
cal diversity and high endemic index (ca. 44% of the species),
but unfortunately it has lost about 55% of their original terri-
tory due to human impacts ( Klink and Machado 2005 ), with
only small areas under protection, such as the Chapada dos
Veadeiros National Park (State of Goiás), created in 1961 and
which has been recognized by UNESCO as a World Natural
Heritage Site since December 2001. This Park is a high-
land complex of 65,514 ha with altitudes ranging from 500–
1,650 m ( Munhoz and Felfili 2006 ). The region is composed
by many diverse habitats, such as open fields (grasslands)
and swampy areas near streams lined with the palm tree
Mauritia flexuosa L. f., a habitat known regionally as “vere-
das.” While undertaking a floristic survey of Utricularia in
the Cerrado, a new Utricularia species was found and is here
described.
Materials and Methods
The type specimen described below is deposited as spirit in R,
SPF and K (acronyms after Thiers 2010 ). General morphology and
measurements were undertaken with a stereoscope and light micro-
scope. A paradermic section of the peduncle was done for sessile
glands visualization. The image was obtained by a Olympus BX – 51
light microscope (LM) with capture system composed by camera Q,
color 5 and software Image Pro-Express. The seed surface was air-
dried, mounted and coated with a gold-palladium (40–60%), and then
observed using a Jeol JSM 6390 LV Scanning Electron Microscope
(SEM); both process at the Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ),
Brazil.
Taxonomic Treatment
Utricularia densiflora Baleeiro & C. P. Bove, sp. nov.—TYPE:
BRAZIL. Goiás: Município de Alto Paraíso de Goiás,
Parque Nacional Chapada dos Veadeiros, Serra da Baleia,
1,100 m, 3 Jun 2009, P. C. Baleeiro 21, C. P. Bove 2020,
A. L. R. Oliveira & R. Couto (hototype: R!; isotypes: K!,
SPF!).
Hidrostadia herbacea. Utriculi foliis, stolonibus, ramis et
rhizoideis. Inflorescentia erecta, satis congesta, scapo variis
glandulis essilibus, racemo ca. 15 floribus flavis, ca. 5 mm
longis; ca. 20 alabastris abortivis subintelectis unusquodque
bractea, inflorescentiae mox infra.
Hydrophytic herb. Rhizoids few or many 2–6, from the
base of the peduncle, filiform, 5–32 × 0.2–0.4 mm, bearing
papillose branches up to 8 mm long, sometimes branched.
Stolons numerous, filiform, branched, up to 8 cm long, ca.
0.2 mm thick. Leaves from the stolons, peduncle base and
rhizoids, petiolate, lamina linear to narrowly obovate, apex
rounded, 1-nerved; up to 18 × 1 mm. Traps numerous on
the leaves, stolons, stolon branches, rhizoids and rhiz-
oid branches, globose, sometimes with a prominent ven-
tral, chin-like swelling, ca. 1 mm long, subsessile or stalked,
mouth basal with double, conical, dorsal appendages, outer
surface of the trap papillose, trap interior with bifid glands.
Inflorescence with spirally arranged bracts and flowers, ca.
10 cm long. Peduncle sometimes sparsely branched below,
A New Species of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) from Chapada dos Veadeiros
(Central Brazil)
Paulo Cesar Baleeiro Souza 1, 2 and Claudia Petean Bove 1
1 Laboratório de Plantas Aquáticas, Departamento de Botânica, Museu Nacional,
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Quinta da Boa Vista,
Rio de Janeiro 20940-040, Brazil
2 Author for correspondence ( paulobaleeiro@gmail.com )
Communicating Editor: Kenneth M. Cameron
Abstract— A new species, Utricularia densiflora , from the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) is described and illustrated. This species was found
growing at the Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park, and is distinguished from the other species in the genus by the presence of several rudi-
mentary (or dormant) floral buds, sessile glands in the peduncle, and highly congested inflorescence. Utricularia densiflora is here consid-
ered a member of section Oligocista and is morphologically similar to U. erectiflora and U. meyeri. A key of the Utricularia species inhabiting the
Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park is provided.
Resumo— Uma nova espécie, Utricularia densiflora , do Cerrado brasileiro é descrita e ilustrada. Essa espécie foi encontrada no Parque
Nacional da Chapada dos Veadeiros. Distingue-se das demais espécies do gênero pela presença de muitos botões florais rudimentares (ou
dormentes), glândulas sésseis no pedúnculo e inflorescência altamente congesta. Utricularia densiflora é aqui considerada membro da seção
Oligocista e morfologicamente semelhante à U. erectiflora e U. meyeri . É disponibilizada uma chave de identificação das espécies ocorrentes no
Parque Nacional da Chapada dos Veadeiros.
Keywords— aquatic plant , Brazil , Cerrado , Chapada dos Veadeiros , new species , taxonomy.
466 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY [Volume 36
terete, 1 mm thick, bearing numerous sessile glands densely
concentrated near the base. Scales ca. 3, ovate, apex acute,
0.6–1.0 × 0.3–0.5 mm. Rudimentary (or dormant) buds below
the lowermost opened flower, (7–)15–23 congested above
and becoming lax towards peduncle base. Bracts strongly
convex, margins curved inwards, broadly ovate with apex
acute or acuminate, 1.8 × 1.5 mm. Bracteoles linear, 0.7 × 0.2
mm. Calyx lobes unequal, ovate, upper lobe 2.0 × 1.0 mm,
apex rounded, lower lobe 1.8 × 1.2 mm, apex acute. Corolla
pale yellow, 0.5 mm long. Filaments almost straight, 0.6 mm
long, anther thecae distinct, 0.3 mm long. Ovary globose,
0.4 mm long, style very minute, stigma lower lip semicir-
cular, upper lip inconspicuous. Flowers 5–16, located above
the rudimentary buds, densely congested, pedicel erect, fili-
form, 1.7 mm long. Bracts basifixed, ovate to widely ovate,
with apex acute 1.5–3 × 1–2 mm. Bracteoles lanceolate to nar-
rowly ovate, ca. 1.0 × 0.4 mm. Calyx lobes subsimilar, decur-
rent at the base, green with winy apex, accrescent enclosing
the capsule, margins strongly involute, obscurely nerved;
lower lobe ovate, apex obtuse, 3 × 2.3 mm, upper lobe widely
ovate with apex acute or acuminate, 3 × 3 mm. Corolla yel-
low, 3–5 mm long; upper lip oblong, constricted near the
center, apex rounded or slightly truncate, entire; lower lip
galeate, approximately circular in outline, slightly swol-
len near the base, entire or emarginated apex. Palate with
a raised, microscopically ciliate rim. Spur subulate, curved
upwards, with acute apex as long as the lower calyx lobe.
Filaments almost straight, 1.1 mm long, anther thecae dis-
tinct, 0.8 mm long. Pollen 4–5-colporate. Ovary globose;
style short; stigma bilabiate, lower lip semicircular, recurved,
upper lip similar but smaller. Capsule globose, glabrous, up
to 2.3 mm. Seeds broadly ovoid, 0.25–1.0 mm long, testa retic-
ulate, testa cells elongated with boundaries raised, straight
to somewhat sinuate, slightly granulose, large lumina
longitudinally striate with bridges connecting the stria
beneath.
Etymology— From the Latin densus (a, um) plus flora, in
reference to the extremely congested flowers on the inflores-
cence ( Fig. 1A ).
Geographic Distribution and Ecology— Although exten-
sive field work was carried out at the Chapada dos Veadeiros,
as well as careful examination of Utricularia collections from
central Brazil (CEN, HEPH, HMS, IBGE, NX, UB, UFG, R,
RB, SP and SPF), U. densiflora is thus far only known from one
locality, near the Serra da Baleia, located within the Chapada
dos Veadeiros National Park, Goiás state. Utricularia den-
siflora occurs sympatrically with Eriocaulon aff. heteropep-
lon Silveira in natural pools of water ca. 7 cm deep among
grasslands.
Conservation Status— According to the IUCN ( IUCN 2001 )
U. densiflora is here classified as Near Threatened (NT).
Discussion
Oligocista A. DC. is the largest section in the genus Utricularia
(37 species), but only a few species occur in the neotropics (six
species). Utricularia densiflora is here considered a member of
this section, due to its galeate lower lip corolla, divergent
spur, calyx lobes subsimilar enclosing the capsule, external
morphology and internal glands of the traps, and pollen mor-
phology. Additional features include simple leaves, basifixed
relatively broad bracts, bracteoles present, and seed morphol-
ogy ( Fig. 2B ). Utricularia densiflora is morphologically most
similar to U. erectiflora and U. meyeri due to the upper corolla
lobe shape, involute calyx margin, with decurrent base, and
narrow leaf lamina with rounded apex. The lower corolla lobe
of U. densiflora resembles that of U. meyeri, which has less con-
gested inflorescences. Utricularia densiflora is unique in having
rudimentary buds subtended by bracts along the peduncle;
strongly congested raceme, numerous sessile glands near the
peduncle base ( Fig. 2A ) becoming scarce towards the apex;
spur as long as the lower calyx lobe and rhizoid branches
somewhat ramified ( Table 1 ).
The rhizoids in Utricularia densiflora are the biggest of the
section (up to 3.5 cm long while those of U. meyeri Pilg. are
up to 2 cm long); interestingly, these rhizoids branch pro-
fusely, a rare feature in the genus. In section Oligocista branch-
ing rhizoids are only seen to a lesser degree in U. letestui
P. Taylor ( Taylor 1989 ). Presumably the size of the rhizoids
and the number of branches enhance the anchoring function
of the relatively large inflorescences of U. densiflora in its shal-
low water habitat.
The rudimentary buds resemble large scales at first
glance ( Fig. 1A ). The bracts are wider than the calyx lobes,
although somewhat shorter, bearing a minute corolla, gynoe-
cium, and androecium. Taylor (1989 :18) mentioned just one
rudimentary bud in several species of section Pleiochasia
(Kamien
´ski) Barnhart, U. simplex R. Br. in section Australes
P. Taylor and U. warmingii Kamien
´ski in section Utricularia
P. Taylor. The single rudimentary buds described by Taylor
are rare occurrences in the species cited, which was not
mentioned by him in the specific detailed descriptions.
All U. densiflora inflorescences studied at the type popula-
tion presented numerous rudimentary buds, thus clearly an
autapomorphy.
Twenty two species of Utricularia have been recorded for
Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park (P. C. Baleeiro, pers.
obs.). An identification key for this region is provided below.
2011] BALEEIRO AND BOVE: NEW SPECIES OF UTRICULARIA 467
F ig . 1. Utricularia densiflora . A – B. Habit. A. Apex of plant with raceme and rudimentary buds. B. Base of plant with scales and peduncle base
with: B1 – rhizoids, B2 – stolon and stolon branches, B3 - leaf and traps. C. Trap detail. D. Aerial inflorescence view. E. Rudimentary bud lateral view.
F. Rudimentary bud longitudinal section. G. Bract. H. Bracteoles. I. Flower with bract and bracteoles. J. Corolla lateral view. K. Corolla upper lobe.
L. Calyx. M. Pistil and stamens. N. Calyx enclosing the young capsule. ( P. C. Baleeiro 21 et al. ).
468 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY [Volume 36
Key to Species of UTRICULARIA from Chapada dos Veadeiros, Goiás State, Brazil
1. Bracts basisolute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2. Bracteoles present . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. pubescens
2. Bracteoles absent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. Corolla yellow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
4. Spur of corolla twice as long as the lower lip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. nigrescens
4. Spur of corolla as long as the lower lip or smaller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5. Nerves of calyx lobes obscure or absent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. trichophylla
5. Nerves of calyx lobes prominent or distinct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
6. Nerves of calyx prominent, extending to the rounded apex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. triloba
6. Nerves of calyx distinct, not extending to the rounded apex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. subulata
3. Corolla violet or white . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
7. Leaves divided into capillary segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. neottioides
7. Leaves not divided into capillary segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
8. Trap mouth with a single ventral appendage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. cucullata
8. Trap mouth with no appendage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. myriocista
1. Bracts basifixed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
9. Bracteoles and scales absent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
10. Peduncle distinct, ca. 2 mm long, bract boat-shaped, hyaline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. biovularioides
10. Peduncle extremely short, ca. 0.5 mm long or apparently absent, bract transversally oblong, not hyaline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. olivacea
9. Bracteoles and scales present . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
11. Corolla yellow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
12. Bracts, bracteoles and scales margins fimbriate-dentate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. simulans
12. Bracts, bracteoles or scales margins laciniate or entire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
13. Leaves dimorphic, corolla 1.5–2.0 cm long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. praelonga
13. Leaves not dimorphic, corolla up to 1.0 cm long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
14. Spur conical, wider than long . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. guyanensis
14. Spur subulate, much longer than wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
15. Traps without appendages, long stalked, upper calyx lobe with prominently raised nerves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. nana
15. Traps with two dorsal appendages, stalked or sessile, upper calyx lobe without
prominently raised nerves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
16. Dormant buds present on the peduncle, pedicel about half as long as the calyx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. densiflora
16. No dormant buds on the peduncle, pedicel about as long as the calyx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. laxa
11. Corolla violet or white . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
17. Bracts and bracteoles basally connate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
18. Lower corolla lip ca. 2 cm wide, not lobed or very shallowly 3- lobed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. tricolor
18. Lower corolla lip 0.25–1 cm wide, distinctly 3-lobed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. amethystina
17. Bracts and bracteoles not basally connate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
19. Calyx with raised, prominent nerves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. purpureocaerulea
19. Calyx nerves not prominent or raised . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
20. Capsule narrowly ellipsoid to very narrowly ovoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. tenuissima
20. Capsule globose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
21. Lower corolla lip 4-lobed and upper lip 2-lobed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. laciniata
21. Lower corolla lip slightly 3-lobed and upper lip entire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U. hispida
F ig . 2. Utricularia densiflora . A. LM of peduncle base showing the sessile glands (white arrow in one of them). B. SEM of seed.
2011] BALEEIRO AND BOVE: NEW SPECIES OF UTRICULARIA 469
Table 1. Comparative diagnostic characters among Utricularia densiflora , U. erectiflora, and U. meyeri .
U. densiflora U. erectiflora U. meyeri
Rhizoids Few to numerous Few Numerous
Peduncle and stolon With several sessile glands Glabrous Glabrous
Leaves Few from the peduncle base and
numerous from the stolons
None from the peduncle and
numerous from the stolons
None from the peduncle and few
from the stolons
Traps Numerous on the leaves, stolons and
stolon branches, few on rhizoids
Occasionally on leaves, numerous on
the stolons, apparently absent from
rhizoids
Few on the stolons and rhizoids
Bracteoles Shorter than the bract. Lanceolate to
narrowly ovate
As long as the bract. Linear Slightly shorter than the bract. Linear
Bracts with rudimentary
(or dormant) floral buds
(7-)15–23 None None
Corolla 3–5 mm 8–12 mm 15–20 mm
Calyx lower lobe apex Entire, reddish Shortly bifid, green Shortly bifid, green
Relationship between spur and
lower calyx lobe Equal in length 2 times longer 3–4 times longer
Acknowledgments. This research was carried out with financial sup-
port of Postgraduate Program in Biological Sciences (Botany) – National
Museum of Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro and Conselho
Nacional de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento- CNPq (grant to P. C. Baleeiro).
We thank Dr. Pedro Carauta for the Latin diagnosis, Dr. Gabriel Bernadello
for suggestions on the manuscript, Fernando Rivadavia for English revi-
sion, Ricardo Moura for aid in choosing the plant name, Adriana Oliveira
for the Eriocaulon identification and for aiding Figure 2 organization.
Fieldwork could not have been conducted without the valuable assistance
of Adriana Oliveira and Ricardo Couto. We also thank SISBIO/IBAMA
for the license to carry out our fieldwork, and Daniel Reis, director of
Veadeiros National Park, for field work facilities. We thank the curators
of the following herbaria for kindly providing access to their collections:
CEN, HEPH, HMS, IBGE, NX, UB, UFG, R, RB, SP, and SPF. Finally, we
thank two reviewers for the excellent suggestions.
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Pp 1163-1166 in Catálogo de Plantas e Fungos do Brasil
  • V F O Miranda
  • F Rivadavia
  • R C Lentibulariaceae
  • J F A Forza
  • C E M Baumgratz
  • A A Bicudo
  • A Carvalho-Jr
  • D P Costa
  • M Costa
  • P M Hopkins
  • L G Leitman
  • L C Lohman
  • G Maia
  • M Martinelli
  • Memezes
Miranda, V. F. O. and F. Rivadavia. 2010. Lentibulariaceae. Pp 1163-1166 in Catálogo de Plantas e Fungos do Brasil , vol. 2, eds. R. C. Forza; J. F. A. Baumgratz; C. E. M. Bicudo; A. A. Carvalho-Jr.; A. Costa; D. P. Costa; M. Hopkins; P. M. Leitman; L. G. Lohman; L. C. Maia; G. Martinelli; M. Memezes; M. P. Morim; M. A. Nadruz Coelho; A. L. Peixoto; J. R. Pirani; J. Prado; L. P. Queiroz; V. C. Souza; J. R. Stehman; L. S. Sylvestre; B. M. T. Wal. Rio de Janeiro: Andrea Jakobsson Estudio. Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro.
2010 and continuously updated] Index Herbariorum: A global directory of public herbaria and associated staff
  • B Thiers
Thiers, B. [2010 and continuously updated]. Index Herbariorum: A global directory of public herbaria and associated staff. New York Botanical Garden's Virtual Herbarium ,
U. biovularioides 10. Peduncle extremely short, ca. 0.5 mm long or apparently absent, bract transversally oblong
  • .................................................... Peduncle Distinct
Peduncle distinct, ca. 2 mm long, bract boat-shaped, hyaline...................................................... U. biovularioides 10. Peduncle extremely short, ca. 0.5 mm long or apparently absent, bract transversally oblong, not hyaline.................... U. olivacea
  • C Guisande
  • C Granado-Lorencio
  • C Andrade-Sossa
  • S R Duque
Guisande, C., C. Granado-Lorencio, C. Andrade-Sossa, and S. R. Duque. 2007. Bladderworts. Functional Plant Science and Biotechnology 1: 58 – 68.