Article

Association of Urinary Bisphenol A Concentration with Medical Disorders and Laboratory Abnormalities in Adults

Epidemiology and Public Health Group, Peninsula Medical School, Barrack Rd, Exeter EX2 5DW, UK.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 35.29). 10/2008; 300(11):1303-10. DOI: 10.1001/jama.300.11.1303
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in epoxy resins lining food and beverage containers. Evidence of effects in animals has generated concern over low-level chronic exposures in humans.
To examine associations between urinary BPA concentrations and adult health status.
Cross-sectional analysis of BPA concentrations and health status in the general adult population of the United States, using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004. Participants were 1455 adults aged 18 through 74 years with measured urinary BPA and urine creatinine concentrations. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, smoking, body mass index, waist circumference, and urinary creatinine concentration. The sample provided 80% power to detect unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) of 1.4 for diagnoses of 5% prevalence per 1-SD change in BPA concentration, or standardized regression coefficients of 0.075 for liver enzyme concentrations, at a significance level of P < .05.
Chronic disease diagnoses plus blood markers of liver function, glucose homeostasis, inflammation, and lipid changes.
Higher urinary BPA concentrations were associated with cardiovascular diagnoses in age-, sex-, and fully adjusted models (OR per 1-SD increase in BPA concentration, 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-1.63; P = .001 with full adjustment). Higher BPA concentrations were also associated with diabetes (OR per 1-SD increase in BPA concentration, 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-1.60; P < .001) but not with other studied common diseases. In addition, higher BPA concentrations were associated with clinically abnormal concentrations of the liver enzymes gamma-glutamyltransferase (OR per 1-SD increase in BPA concentration, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.14-1.46; P < .001) and alkaline phosphatase (OR per 1-SD increase in BPA concentration, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.18-1.85; P = .002).
Higher BPA exposure, reflected in higher urinary concentrations of BPA, may be associated with avoidable morbidity in the community-dwelling adult population.

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    • "Recent work also demonstrated an association between urinary BPA content and adverse liver effects in young boys (Khalil et al., 2014). Given that the latter cited studies are crosssectional in design, there has been concern that reverse causality may be important (Lang et al., 2008). There is recent epidemiological evidence to support this concern. "

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    • "In 2008, Lang, et al. reported the levels of urinary BPA in samples collected by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) of U.S. adults that had also completed a health survey [36]. No association between elevated BPA concentrations and cancer was evident. "
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